Special Issue: Contemplative Writing Across the Disciplines

Guest editors: Marlowe Miller, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, and Karolyn Kinane, University of Virginia

This issue focuses on the use of contemplative writing as a practice (or set of practices) used in the context of writing across the curriculum and in the disciplines. As explored in the essays within this issue, contemplative writing is most commonly one aspect of carefully constructed contemplative pedagogies and integrated into classes in scaffolded and deliberate ways that might encourage nonjudgmental awareness, embodied or spiritual experience, honor for the interconnectedness of all beings, and more. Most of the scholars in this issue speak of contemplative writing as a practice, much like one might speak of prayer or meditation as a practice. The scholars included in this special issue are building a broader definition of contemplative writing as they offer additional wisdom about contemplative writing and metacognition, contemplative writing and grading, contemplative research writing, and much more.

Contents

Contemplative Writing Across the Disciplines
Marlowe Miller, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, and Karolyn Kinane, University of Virginia

The Place of Practice in Contemplative Pedagogy and Writing
Karolyn Kinane, University of Virginia

Building a Contemplative Research Writing Course: Theoretical Considerations, Practical Components, Challenges, and Adaptability
Nadia Francine Zamin, Fairfield University

Using Mindfulness as a Heuristic for Writing Evaluation: Transforming Pedagogy and Quality of Experience
Jennifer Consilio and Sheila M. Kennedy, Lewis University

Writing Into Awareness: How Metacognitive Awareness Can Be Encouraged Through Contemplative Teaching Practices
Kate Chaterdon, Marist College

Contemplation as Kairotic Composure
Kurt Stavenhagen, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and Timothy R. Daugherty, West Chester University of Pennsylvania