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Your search found 17889 citations. You can also view these results in a table layout and a format that is suitable for pasting into a spreadsheet.

1. Bailie, Brian. (Spring 2010). Smart Mobs and Kenneth Burke. Loveland. KB Journal, 6.2. http://kbjournal.org/smart-mobs-and-kenneth-burke
Keywords: rhetorical analysis, technology, protest, Kenneth Burke, Digital composition
2. Liang, Mei-Ya. (September 2013). Rethinking Authenticity: Voice and Feedback in Media Discourse. Computers and Composition 30.3, 157-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2013.06.002
Annotation: Authentic communicative practices in the virtual world can be utilized to develop the writing processes of foreign language students. Authenticity is harder to achieve in EFL settings, where the students must find a balance between the self and society. These students may have more difficulty engaging in cultural materials, such as media discourse, in peer groups or classroom settings. The real-world environment comes with a power hierarchy in which those with a less intimate relationship to English are at the bottom, creating threatening and intimidating conditions for EFL students. Shifting the discourse to a virtual environment removes the constraints that come with face-to-face interactions, which allows EFL students to receive and give authentic feedback. Real-time online chat bridges the gap between students by stripping the conversation of the uncomfortable constraints that come with face-to-face interaction, and creating an easygoing environment that comes with online communication. Online chat does not require the same serious and professional social skills typically used in the classroom, giving EFL students the ability to save face during the exchange of thoughts and feelings. The combination of virtual-world mechanics and real-world issues (e.g., connectivity problems) enhances the multimodal experience for the students and produces engaging news writing from diverse perspectives. Media discourse in a virtual collaborative learning environment creates connections between voice and composition through the facilitation of authentic engagement between peers and EFL students.
Keywords: authenticity, voice, Second Life, EFL, writing media, discourse, peer response
3. Wallack, Nicole B. (May 2017). Crafting Presence: The American Essay and the Future of Writing Studies. Utah State University Press (pp. 248). https://upcolorado.com/utah-state-university-press/item/3030-crafting-presence
Annotation: Essays are central to students' and teachers' development as thinkers in their fields. In Crafting Presence, Nicole B. Wallack develops an approach to teaching writing with the literary essay that holds promise for writing students, as well as for achieving a sense of common purpose currently lacking among professionals in composition, creative writing, and literature. Wallack analyzes examples drawn primarily from volumes of The Best American Essays to illuminate the most important quality of the essay as a literary form: the writer's ""presence."" She demonstrates how accounting for presence provides a flexible and rigorous heuristic for reading the contexts, formal elements, and purposes of essays. Such readings can help students learn writing principles, practices, and skills for crafting myriad presences rather than a single voice. Crafting Presence holds serious implications for writing pedagogy by providing new methods to help teachers and students become more insightful and confident readers and writers of essays. At a time when liberal arts education faces significant challenges, this important contribution to literary studies, composition, and creative writing shows how an essay-centered curriculum empowers students to show up in the world as public thinkers who must shape the ""knowledge economy"" of the twenty-first century.
Keywords: writing studies, FYC, FYW, composition, evidence, essay, presence, The Best American Essays, reading, high school
4. Bannon, Jessica Lyn. (March 2019). We Are Your Neighbors: Making Public Space for Personal Stories in Immigration Advocacy. Spark: A Journal of Activism in Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy Studies, 1.1. https://sparkactivism.com/journal-issues/we-are-your-neighbors-making-public-space-for-personal-stories-in-immigration-advocacy/
Annotation: Jessica Lyn Bannon's "We Are Your Neighbors: Making Public Space for Personal Stories in Immigration Advocacy" details a community writing partnership between activist-scholars at the University of Indianapolis and members of Indianapolis' Latinx community; the partnership led to the publication of an anthology of stories describing what it is like to be an immigrant in the United States in today's political climate.
Keywords: immigration advocacy, immigration activism, civic engagement, community writing, immigration, activist, undocumented youth, Latinx immigration, activist-scholars, Indianapolis Latinx community
5. Matheson, Breeanne; Matthew Christensen; Diana Lee; Eilen E. Castellano. (March 2019). Designing Documents for the Undocumented: Collective Action in the Technical Communication Classroom. Spark: A Journal of Activism in Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy Studies. https://sparkactivism.com/journal-issues/designing-documents-for-the-undocumented-collective-action-in-the-technical-communication-classroom/
Annotation: In "Designing Documents for the Undocumented: Collective Action in the Technical Communication Classroom," Breeanne Matheson, Matthew Christensen, Diana Lees, and Eilen E. Castellano discuss a project where Matheson's technical communication class at Utah Valley University worked with a nonprofit organization to design documents to help undocumented people who have been detained by the US government receive the information they need to represent themselves in court.
Keywords: undocumented workers, immigrant activism, collective action, collaborative writing, social justice, activism
6. Reyes, Berte. (March 2019). Moments and Movements: On Scholar-Activists Considering the Connection Between Activism and Organizing. Spark: A Journal of Activism in Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy Studies, 1.1. https://sparkactivism.com/journal-issues/moments-and-movements-on-scholar-activists-considering-the-connection-between-activism-and-organizing/
Annotation: In "Moments and Movements: On Scholar-Activists Considering the Connection Between Activism and Organizing," Berte Reyes describes their journey through activism and organizing, exploring the purpose and performance aspects of activism and considering how scholarly activism can best fit into ongoing social-justice work.
Keywords: scholar-activist, scholar-organizer, activism, activist, organizing, organizer, social justice, community writing, student engagement
7. Smith-Sitton, Lara. (March 2019). Tea Rozman Clark on the Power of Storytelling in Activist Work. Spark: A Journal of Activism in Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy Studies, 1.1. https://sparkactivism.com/journal-issues/tea-rozman-clark-on-the-power-of-storytelling-in-activist-work/
Annotation: Lara Smith-Sitton's interview with "Tea Rozman Clark On the Power of Storytelling in Activist Work" addresses the history, mission, and advocacy conducted by Minneapolis-based nonprofit Green Card Voices.
Keywords: storytelling activism, immigration activism, community writing, civic engagement, social justice, digital narratives,
8. Smith-Sitton, Lara; Darlene Xiomara Rodriguez; Paul N. McDaniel. (March 2019). When Local Community Writing Initiatives Crashed into White House Public Policy--Green Card Youth Voices: Immigration Stories from an Atlanta High School. Spark: A Journal of Activism in Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy Studies. https://sparkactivism.com/journal-issues/when-local-community-writing-initiatives-crashed-into-white-house-public-policy-green-card-youth-voices-immigration-stories-from-an-atlanta-high-school/
Annotation: In "When Local Community Writing Initiatives Crashed into White House Public Policy--Green Card Youth Voices: Immigration Stories from an Atlanta High School," Lara Smith-Sitton, Darlene Xiomara Rodriguez, and Paul N. McDaniel describe a two-year partnership between Green Card Voices and Kennesaw State University, as well as ancillary partnerships with public high schools and nonprofit organizations in metro Atlanta. This partnership connected English, Social Work, and Geography courses, as well as college and high school classrooms, in order to collect, publish, and share stories from high school-aged immigrants and refugees.
Keywords: immigration, immigration activism, green card stories, civic engagement, community writing, Atlanta, citizenship, refugees
9. Sévère, Richard. (March 1, 2019). Black Male Bodies in the Center. Denny, Harry; Robert Mundy; Liliana M. Naydan; Richard Sévère; Anna Sicari (Eds.), Out in the Center: Public Controversies and Private Struggles, Louisville, University Press of Colorado (pp. 43-50).
Annotation: Sévère discusses how the black male body is perceived and received in the writing center space through discussions of physicality, power, and microaggressions within the center. He also considers the potential tension between master narratives of writing center studies that posit them as comfortable, homey environments and the portrayal of black bodies in the American media. While not offering catch-all fixes, Sévère does comment on the extra level of responsibility black men face in the center that requires them to be constantly aware of the messages their body sends to tutors and clients.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, tutor training, race, racism, embodiment
10. Rallin, Aneil. (June 2019). Dreads and Open Mouths: Living/Teaching/Writing Queerly. Sacramento: Litwin Books (pp. 216 pages). https://litwinbooks.com/books/dreads-and-open-mouths/
Annotation: This timely, provocative, unruly, formally experimental/scholarly hybrid book charts an activist life of teaching/writing queerly over the past twenty years from the author's subject position as a queer immigrant scholar/teacher of color situated in the field of rhetoric and composition. Quirky and polemical, Dreads and Open Mouths: Living/Teaching/Writing Queerly blurs genres and challenges the boundaries between "scholarly" and "creative," "literary" and "pedagogical," "personal" and "political" as it explores and makes (dis)connections among literacy, writing, teaching, rhetoric, imagination, desire, sexuality, race, gender, politics, pleasure, resistance, education practices, assessment, global geopolitics, national boundaries, and students who have traditionally been marginalized in institutions of higher learning. It adds to the growing body of imaginative experimental activist work that refuses to be constrained by convention or to follow convention for the sake of following convention. It insists that queer inquiry eschew prescriptions for conventional academic discourse.
Keywords: queer, sexuality, race, gender, pedagogy, diversity, identity, postcolonial, experimental writing, transgression, pleasure, desire, resistance, borders, bodies, hegemony, marginalization, literacy, teaching,
11. Baddour, Elizabeth. (Jun 30, 2020). Juanita Williamson and the HBCU Influence in Writing Instruction. Memphis. Spark: a 4C4Equality Journal, Vol. II. https://sparkactivism.com/volume-2-call/vol-2-intro/juanita-williamson-hbcu-influence/
Keywords: Black Studies, HBCU, Writing Instruction, Higher Education, Black Academics
12. Craig, Sherri; Karrieann Soto Vega. (Jun 30, 2020). Talisha Haltiwanger Morrison on Black Studies & Writing Center Potentialities. Spark: a 4C4Equality Journal, Vol. II. https://sparkactivism.com/volume-2-call/vol-2-intro/talisha-haltiwanger-morrison-interview/
Keywords: Black Studies, Higher Education, Black Student Experience, Writing Center, Higher Education Interview, Perspective Piece
13. Julia Bleakney. (January, 15). Ongoing Writing Tutor Education: Models and Practices. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Bleakney.html
Annotation: Julia Bleakney identifies and describes the types of ongoing education models based on the results of a comprehensive research project that included a national survey and interviews of writing center professionals. Julia uses quantitative and qualitative results to suggest smart practices and recommendations for designing ongoing education programs.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, tutor-training, ongoing tutor-training, survey, leadership, assessment, reflection, scaffolding
14. Aikens, Kristina. (January 15, 2019). "Prioritizing Antiracism in Writing Tutor Education.". Karen Gabrielle Johnson and Ted Roggenbuck, How We Teach Writing Tutors. Writing Lab News Letter. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Aikens.html
Annotation: For the past nine years, Kristina Aikens has been in charge of overseeing "a graduate writing consultant program and an undergraduate writing fellows program" (par. 1) at her institution. Throughout her time here, she has overhauled each program to center on anti-racist pedagogy, and in this chapter, she details her experience in order to provide other Writing Center professionals with strategies to shape their center around antiracist pedagogy. Guiding her program changes was a body of anti-racist and feminist literature. As she read through, Aikens noticed three trends that would later influence both writing programs: 1. Academic language is privileged; therefore, tutors need to work against further assimilation. 2. Tutors need to address their own positionality and reflect on how that influences their work. 3. Tutors need to practice how to resist oppressive language in student papers.
Keywords: Antiracist, Writing Center, Tutoring, Tutor Education
15. Buck, Elizabeth H. (January 15, 2019). "From CRLA to For-Credit Course: The New Director's Guide to Assessing Tutor Education". Karen Gabrielle Johnson and Ted Roggenbuck, How We Teach Writing Tutors. Writing Lab News Letter. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Buck.html
Annotation: In this chapter, Buck explores the switch from a CRLA tutoring training course to a for-credit tutor education course. In order to determine the differences between the two training options, she developed a survey for students to take. After analyzing the data, she noticed that students who participated in the for-credit course generally felt more prepared, particularly in regards Writing Center scholarship. She explains that students in the course were more likely to make connections between their work in the center and the readings they discussed in class.
Keywords: Tutor Education, Writing Center, CRLA, Training Course
16. Craig Medvecky. (January 15, 2019). Enter the Dragon: Graduate Tutor Education in the Hall of Mirrors. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Medvecky.html
Annotation: Craig Medvecky critically analyzes three models of graduate tutor education. Drawing from these models, Craig argues for a systemic approach to graduate writing support and proposes a set of learning outcomes for tutor education programs.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, tutor-training, graduate
17. Crystal Conzo. (January 15, 2019). Exploring and Enhancing Writing Tutors' Resource-Seeking Behaviors. Johnson, Karen G., and Ted Roggenbuck, editors. How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. 2019, https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Conzo.html
Annotation: Crystal Conzo sets out to research her tutors' resource seeking behaviors and regarding how often tutors used the approved WC materials, how they filled perceived holes in their knowledge, how they used their free-time, and other areas concerned with resource usage and learning in the center. Conzo outlines her tutors' utilization of certain writing resources in assisting students. Through her observations of students, she noticed that "tutors accrue what they believe to be 'enough' knowledge and henceforth decline to add more to their existing repertoire, rely on only one or two resources, use unreliable resources, and Google search resources." This leads to a problematic pattern in her center where tutors are potentially providing false information or are seen as less professional than they ought to be
Keywords: writing tutor education, writing center, wcenter, tutor training, professional development, graduate student administrators
18. Holly Ryan. (January 15, 2019). First Things First: An Introduction to Administration at a New Directors' Retreat. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Ryan.html
Annotation: Holly Ryan describes a weekend retreat to support new directors. She developed workshops and activities that help new directors examine and create foundational documents such as mission and vision statements, branding, and assessment. Holly argues that such topics should be considered before a director can develop a tutor education program.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, administration, workshop, new directors, writing center professionals
19. Jessica Clements. (January 15, 2019). The Role of New Media Expertise in Shaping Writing Consultations. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Clements.html
Annotation: Jessica Clements coded tutorial session transcripts to better understand how a tutor's new media expertise might affect a writing tutorial's overall effectiveness. She finds tutors' confidence may impact effectiveness more than their new media expertise and offers practical suggestions for building new media composing confidence in existing tutor education programs.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, tutor training, tutor confidence, new media, multimodality, empirical research, transcription, coding, survey
20. Julia Bleakney. (January 15, 2019). Ongoing Writing Tutor Education: Models and Practices. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Bleakney.html
Annotation: Julia Bleakney identifies and describes the types of ongoing education models based on the results of a comprehensive research project that included a national survey and interviews of writing center professionals. Julia uses quantitative and qualitative results to suggest smart practices and recommendations for designing ongoing education programs.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, tutor-training, ongoing tutor-training, survey, leadership, assessment, reflection, scaffolding
21. Katherine DeLuca and Hsing-Yin Cynthia Lin. (January 15, 2019). Developing a Multilingual and Interdisciplinary Writing Center: Reviewing Goals and Activities from the Graduate Writing Consultant Workshop. Karen G. Johnson and Ted Roggenbuck, How We Teach Writing Tutors, A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/LinDeluca.html
Annotation: The focus of this chapter is the Writing Consultant Workshop (WCW) at the Ohio State University Writing Center. The WCW was a six-week program that accompanied the 20-hour mandatory training required by the center. It was launched in 2013 in response to increasing numbers of non-native English speaking (NNES) writers and the desire to better serve this population.
Keywords: writing center, tutor training, workshop, multilingual tutors
22. Katrina Bell. (January 15, 2019). "Our Professional Descendants Preparing Graduate Writing Consultants". Karen Gabrielle Johnson and Ted Roggenbuck, How We Teach Writing Tutors. Writing Lab News Letter. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Bell.html
Annotation: Bell's study is centered around the following question, "How are graduate writing center consultants participating in professional development?" When they began to research this topic, Bell noticed the following key trends within the scholarship: 1. A focus on training (not PD) 2. Tutoring guides focus on the work tutor do within the center 3. There is an abundance of tutoring guides for undergraduates (but not for graduate students) 4. Course work in PD tends to prepare students as scholars rather than professionals After a careful analysis of existing literature, Bell identified two gaps that she explores in her study. First, literature that explores the preparation of current WC professionals is sparse, and second, we do not have a strong grasp on how PD actually works. She explains that because most scholarship is individualistic (lore), we "can only advance as individuals, rather than as a field" (par. 10). With these gaps in mind, Bell conducted an empirical study in which she collected survey data and analyzed "curricular artifacts" from 27 WC professionals on the WC listserv (it is important to note that only 4 respondents sent artifacts). An analysis of the data showed that PD is often similar for both undergraduate and graduate students.
Keywords: Writing Center, Professional Development, Graduate Students,
23. Lisa Cahill, Molly Rentscher, Kelly Chase, Darby Simpson, and Jessica Jones. (January 15, 2019). Developing and Implementing Core Principles for Tutor Education: Administrative Goals and Tutor Perspectives. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Cahilletal.html
Annotation: Lisa Cahill, Molly Rentscher, Kelly Chase, Darby Simpson, and Jessica Jones describe how their team at Arizona State University adapted habits of mind from The Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing and beliefs from Muriel Harris's "The Concept of a Writing Center" to develop principles guiding their writing center practices.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, tutor education, ongoing tutor-education, current practices, habits of mind, core beliefs, core principles
24. Mary Pigliacelli. (January 15, 2019). Practitioner Action Research on Writing Center Tutor Education: Critical Discourse Analysis of Reflections on Video-recorded Sessions. Johnson, Karen G., and Ted Roggenbuck, editors. How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. 2019, https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Pigliacelli.html
Annotation: Mary Pigliacelli undertakes practitioner action research in order to "[ask] a question about one's own practice that can be answered by employing an organized problem-solving approach." She hoped to "articulate for [herself] what constitutes effective collaborative tutoring and how [she] could help tutors develop the habits of mind and the skills that would allow them to be effective, collaborative tutors" by performing a critical discourse analysis on her tutors post-session video recordings and self-reflections.
Keywords: writing tutor education, writing center, critical discourse analysis, reflection, action research
25. Rebecca Crews and Katie Garahan. (January 15, 2019). The Role of the Tutor in Developing and Facilitating Writing Center Workshops. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/CrewsGarahan.html
Annotation: Crews and Garahan present survey responses from a national survey of more than 200 writing center professionals about the roles tutors play in developing and facilitating workshops. The authors offer several valuable purposeful practices based on their data.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, tutor-training, workshop, survey, survey-design
26. Russell Carpenter, Scott Whiddon, and Courtnie Morin. (January 15, 2019). Understanding What Certifications Mean for Writing Centers: Analyzing a Pilot Program via a Regional Organization. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Carpenteretal.html
Annotation: Russell Carpenter, Scott Whiddon, and Courtnie Morin detail the conception, development, application process, and assessment of an innovative regional accreditation program exclusively for writing centers. They argue that certification helps writing center professionals develop academic capital, solidify foundational beliefs, and improve tutor education programs.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, certification, survey, academic capital, credibility, training, tutor-education
27. Sarah Peterson Pittock and Erica Cirillo-McCarthy. (January 15, 2019). Let's Meet in the Lounge: Toward a Cohesive Tutoring Pedagogy in a Writing and Speaking Center. Karen G. Johnson and Ted Roggenbuck, How We Teach Writing Tutors, A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/PittockCirillo-McCarthy.html
Annotation: This chapter describes the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking at Stanford University, which is staffed by oral communication and writing tutors at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. The Director of the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking and the Director of Oral Communication teamed up to develop a cross-discipline workshop series that helps create a more cohesive and shared community of tutors.
Keywords: writing center, tutor training, speaking tutor pedagogy, writing tutor pedagogy, oral communication, workshop
28. Tom Earles and Leigh Ryan. (January 15, 2019). Teaching, Learning, and Practicing Professionalism in the Writing Center. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/EarlesRyan.html
Annotation: Tom Earles and Leigh Ryan recount the development of a writing center "Code of Professionalism," from conception and composition through adoption and revision. Using the collective insights of tutors, Tom and Leigh describe how tutors created their own code to teach and encourage professionalism among writing center staff.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, professional responsibility, tutor, tutor-training
29. Daniel Gallagher and Aimee Maxfield. (January 15 2019). Learning Online to Tutor Online. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teaching Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/GallagherMaxfield.html
Annotation: Dan Gallagher and Aimee Maxfield describe the online tutor education program of a virtual writing center that prepares tutors to respond to writing through advice letters, audio and video feedback, multimedia resources, and recorded synchronous tutoring sessions. Dan and Aimee share how their online tutor education helps prepare tutors to facilitate the online learning experience to better support writers.
Keywords: writing center, wcenter, online tutoring, tutor training, asynchronous tutoring, distance learning, online education, synchronous tutoring
30. Naydan, Liliana M. (2021). What are You?: Rethinking Frames for Contingent Writing Center Work. Speaking Up, Speaking Out: Lived Experiences of Non-Tenure-Track Faculty in Writing Studies (pp. 59-69).
Keywords: contingency, contingent, writing center, labor, feminist, women, work
31. Alexander, Kara Poe; Lisa Shaver. (2020). Disrupting the Numbers: The Impact of a Women's Faculty Writing Program on Associate Professors. College Composition and Communication 72.1, 58-86.
Annotation: Women continue to be underrepresented at the highest academic rank of full professor. Studies show that once women earn tenure, they are inundated with teaching, service, and administrative responsibilities, which take time away from research and publication-the primary criteria for promotion. We believe that rhetoric and writing studies (RWS) faculty are uniquely situated to confront this challenge because of our disciplinary expertise, our experience administering writing programs, and our interest in equity. With the goal to increase the number of women full professors at our university, we created a year-long writing program for women associate professors. Based on results from this pilot study, we argue that RWS faculty can use their expertise to decrease the disparity at the highest academic rank and make the university more diverse and equitable. Moreover, we believe that RWS scholars can use their disciplinary expertise to address a range of other institutional and systemic challenges.
Keywords: feminist, women-only, writing-circle, productivity, support-group
32. Alison Klein. (2020). The opinion podcast: A visceral form of persuasion. Prompt, 4.1, 29-40. https://doi.org/10.31719/pjaw.v4i1.55
Annotation: In this assignment, students create a podcast episode in which they make an argument on a topic in current events. Through this process, students develop traditional rhetorical skills such as awareness of audience, formulation of a thesis, and inclusion of compelling evidence, in a new context that allows them room for creativity and for approaching these techniques from a different angle. Accustomed to composing analysis essays and research papers on a computer screen, students who create an argument in the aural medium must consider the best way to grab and hold the listener's attention so that the listener's mind does not wander, and to convey information clearly and concisely so that the listener never needs to rewind. Additionally, students become familiar with audio editing software and other aspects of digital composition, and they explore a medium that may feel like a refuge in today's screen-saturated world.
Keywords: PEDAGOGY, REFLECTIVE PRACTICE, ASSIGNMENT-WRITING, ASSIGNMENT, PODCAST, FYC
33. Alowaid, Rehab. (2020). 'Tutoring Is Not Proofreading'. Exploring the Perceptions of Writing Tutors at University Writing Centres, Saudi Arabia: An Exploratory Study. English Language Teaching. 13.12;, 5-14. doi: 10.5539/elt.v13n12p5
Annotation: Academic discourse is highly complex and requires writers to follow specific writing conventions. Many Saudi university students have underdeveloped writing skills (Al-Khairy, 2013). One way to assist second language (L2) learners and develop their academic writing skills is through academic language support offered by writing centres. The challenge for writing centre tutors lies in the predominant belief among many L2 students that tutors' only role is to fix students' mistakes. Although there has been significant growth in writing centres in Saudi universities, the perceptions of writing tutors concerning tutoring non-native students are still under-researched. This study uses thematic analysis to explore the role of writing tutorials as perceived by writing centre tutors in Saudi settings. Data were obtained using an interpretive inquiry through individual interviews of two tutors. The main findings of the interviews were that tutors perceived proofreading requests, low writing proficiency of tutees and tutees' understanding of tutors' role as influencing their tutorial practices. The implementation of this study may help regulate the role of tutors in writing centres in Saudi universities by highlighting new avenues that can improve writing tutorials, especially in Saudi Arabia.
Keywords: writing centre, writing support, proofreading trap, writing tutorial, tutors, wcenter, international, Saudi Arabia
34. Alyse Knorr. (2020). Staging Othello: Turning students into directors. Prompt, 4.1, 41-49. https://doi.org/10.31719/pjaw.v4i1.56
Annotation: The *Othello* staging project invites introductory literature students to imagine that they are directing a new production of *Othello*. Students create a production proposal and poster that illustrate their directorial choices, using their original interpretation of the play as a guiding philosophy. This assignment successfully addresses many of the challenges associated with teaching an introductory-level, required "core" course of non-English-majors, as well as the challenges of teaching drama in general and Shakespeare in particular. Creative response assignments like this prompt can foster student engagement, mitigate student writing anxiety, and deepen student understandings of plays as living documents open to artistic interpretation.
Keywords: PEDAGOGY, REFLECTIVE PRACTICE, ASSIGNMENT-WRITING, ASSIGNMENT, WID, ENGLISH-STUDIES, DRAMA-WRITING, LITERARY-ANALYSIS
35. Basgier, Christopher & Simpson, Amber. (2020). Reflecting on the past, reconstructing the future: Faculty members’ threshold concepts for teaching writing in the disciplines. Across the Disciplines, 17(1-2), 6-25. https://doi.org/10.37514/ATD-J.2020.17.1-2.02
Annotation: Besgier and Simpson’s qualitative study brings phenomenological research methodologies (i.e., categorizing the phenomenon of varying experiences) to the study of cross-disciplinary, process-based thinking about threshold concepts for the teaching of writing specific to--not generalizable across--disciplines and experiences (e.g., disposition, prior knowledge, novice/expert, self-identification, training). Primary findings are listed below; however, the purpose for this work, as articulated in the article, is to provide a reproducible method for mapping faculty thinking about writing instruction. The authors take as their corpus reflective narratives (oral and written) from 95 participants located in thirteen colleges across Auburn University, from which they categorize, code, and interpret participants’ individual and epistemic thinking about threshold concepts for writing instruction into narrative types. Though preliminary, Besgier and Simpson’s findings provide two significant interpretations for consideration in WAC/WID scholarship: 1) local and disciplinary dimensions are critical to understanding cross-disciplinary perceptions of threshold concepts for teaching writing, but those dimensions are incomplete if variation in experience is not also incorporated into research studies; and, 2) cross-disciplinary conceptions of writing instruction are not always in direct alignment with threshold concepts for the study of writing.
Keywords: phenomenology, WAC/WID, threshold concepts, writing instruction
36. Blaauw-Hara, Mark; Carrie Strand Tebeau; Dominic Borowiak; Jami Blaauw-Hara. (2020). Is a Writing-about-Writing Approach Appropriate for Community College Developmental Writers in a Corequisite Class?. Composition Studies 48.2, 54-73. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/08/blaauw-hara-tebeau-borowiak-blaauw-hara.pdf
Annotation: Current trends in developmental writing have focused on corequisite support courses that developmental writers take in conjunction with college-level courses. Much recent scholarship has focused on the design of the corequisite course, but a corequisite model also raises the stakes of the curricular design of the college-level course, since it now features developmental writers. In this article, we describe a qualitative research project designed to explore whether a writing-about-writing college-level curriculum is appropriate for community-college developmental writers in an ALP corequisite model. [John Whicker and Doug Downs, Writing-About-Writing Curricula: Research on Effectiveness and Applications, WPA-CompPile Research Bibliographies, No. 12 (2nd ed.)]
Keywords: basic, two-year, corequisite, writing-about-writing, WAW, state-mandated, FYC, basic writing, developmental writing, reading, self-efficacy
37. Blair, Kristine L. (2020). Social Media Ethics and the Rhetorical Tradition [book review]. Composition Studies 48.1, 127-135. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/br_blair.pdf
Keywords: Rhetoric, Technology, and the Virtues, by Jared S. Colton and Steve Holmes, Social Writing/Social Media: Publics, Presentations, and Pedagogies, edited by Douglas M. Walls and Stephanie Vie, social media, ethics, digital, online
38. Brown, Tessa. (2020). What Else Do We Know? Translingualism and the History of SRTOL as Threshold Concepts in Our Field. College Composition and Communication 71.4, 591-619.
Annotation: In this article, the author uses storytelling to retell moments in the history of our field. Using personal anecdote alongside critical race theory and critical whiteness studies, she critiques the Writing About Writing movement by re-situating it in history: first narrating it as a contemporary of the Translingualism movement, and then comparing it with Mina Shaughnessy's Errors & Expectations. These two sets of narrative, historicized foils allow the author to develop a portrait of the Writing About Writing movement as a colorblind countermovement to the translingualism movement, a bid for power in the white context of academic institutions at a moment of austerity in the first decade of the 2000s. Instead of the Writing About Writing movement's colorblind and ahistorical portrait of what writing scholars know, the author tells stories that center translingualism and Students' Right to Their Own Language as central concepts to the study of rhetoric, composition, writing, and literacy. Brown critiques WAW approaches that have excluded multilingual, diverse writers via colorblind, neoliberal pedagogies and suggests a translingual WAW pedagogy to address these problems. For her analysis, Brown draws on the scholarship of hip-hop literacy, “Students’ Rights to Their Own Language,” and translingualism, and she both employs and defends humanistic methods of storytelling, historicizing, and rhetorical analysis, which “when brought together” she calls “a constellation: the work of connecting the dots” (593). The main objects of Brown’s critique are Wardle and Downs’s Writing about Writing textbook (1st-3rd editions) and Adler-Kassner and Wardle’s Naming What We Know, which Brown posits as “the writing studies movement’s two key texts” (591). Both books, she argues, “ghettoize the knowledge produced by reflection” and “frame identity as a learning opportunity” by hierarchizing research-based knowledge over experiential writerly knowledge and relegating identity to “prior experience,” “not essential and ongoing facets of communicative context” (608). Brown then proposes four translingual threshold concepts that could form the basis of WAW approaches: language rights and privileges are political, “English Only” is political rather than a linguistic reality, literacy educators have held prescriptivism and descriptivism in tension, and students have a right to learn and communicate in all their languages.[John Whicker and Doug Downs, Writing-About-Writing Curricula: Research on Effectiveness and Applications, WPA-CompPile Research Bibliographies, No. 12 (2nd ed.)]
Keywords: story, color-blind, translingual, hip-hop, students' rights to their own language, SRTOL, NWWK, WAW, writing about writing
39. Cedillo, Christina V. (2020). (Inter-)Cultural Literacies: Towards Inclusive Writing Pedagogies and Practices [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 132-139. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/cedillo_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Bordered Writers: Latinx Identities and Literacy Practices at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, edited by Isabel Baca, Yndalecio Isaac Hinojosa, and Susan Wolff Murphy, Writing Across Cultures, by Robert Eddy and Amanda Espinosa-Aguilar, Latino, Latina, racial, racism, culture, inclusive pedagogy
40. Cedillo, Christina V. (2020). (Inter-)Cultural Literacies: Towards Inclusive Writing Pedagogies and Practices [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 132-139. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/cedillo_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Bordered Writers: Latinx Identities and Literacy Practices at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, edited by Isabel Baca, Yndalecio Isaac Hinojosa, and Susan Wolff Murphy, Writing Across Cultures, by Robert Eddy and Amanda Espinosa-Aguilar, Latino, Latina, racial, racism, culture, inclusive pedagogy
41. Cedillo, Christina V. (2020). (Inter-)Cultural Literacies: Towards Inclusive Writing Pedagogies and Practices [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 132-139. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/cedillo_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Bordered Writers: Latinx Identities and Literacy Practices at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, edited by Isabel Baca, Yndalecio Isaac Hinojosa, and Susan Wolff Murphy, Writing Across Cultures, by Robert Eddy and Amanda Espinosa-Aguilar, Latino, Latina, racial, racism, culture, inclusive pedagogy
42. Cedillo, Christina V. (2020). (Inter-)Cultural Literacies: Towards Inclusive Writing Pedagogies and Practices [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 132-139. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/cedillo_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Bordered Writers: Latinx Identities and Literacy Practices at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, edited by Isabel Baca, Yndalecio Isaac Hinojosa, and Susan Wolff Murphy, Writing Across Cultures, by Robert Eddy and Amanda Espinosa-Aguilar, Latino, Latina, racial, racism, culture, inclusive pedagogy
43. Chen, Vicky; Carol B. Olson; Huy Quoc Chung. (2020). Understanding Proficiency: Analyzing the Characteristics of Secondary Students’ On-Demand Analytical Essay Writing. Journal of Writing Assessment 13.1. http://journalofwritingassessment.org/article.php?article=146
Annotation: This study investigated the different characteristics of not-pass (n = 174), adequate-pass (n = 173), and strong-pass (n = 114) text-based, analytical essays written by middle and high school students. Essays were drawn from the 2015-2016 Pathway writing and reading intervention pretests and posttests. Results revealed the use of relevant summary was an important difference between not-pass and adequate-pass essays where significantly more adequate-pass essays used summary in a purposeful rather than general way. In contrast, major characteristics that set apart strong-pass essays from adequate-pass essays involved providing analysis and including a clear conclusion or end. Factors that affected these characteristics such as whether the writer made claims and comments about the text are discussed, and some instructional strategies are suggested.
Keywords: writing proficiency, writing instruction, adolescent literacy, text-based analytical writing, on-demand writing assessment
44. Clem, Logan. (2020). Eco-Administration: Resources toward Developing a Place-Conscious Writing Program. https://ecowpa.wordpress.ncsu.edu/
Annotation: This site compiles suggestions and considerations for WPAs and composition instructors to begin creating a more place-conscious writing program. This site provides an overview and introduction to the goals of place-conscious education and introduces several areas of interest to WPAs, including programmatic assessment, professional development, and curriculum design. This site also compiles readings and assignment models for instructors to use in a place conscious writing or composition classroom as well as further reading recommendations for instructors to explore place-conscious approaches to composition instruction.
Keywords: place-conscious education, place-based education, place-based, WPA, ecocomposition, sustainability, community literacy, civic literacy, community writing, community-engaged scholarship, pedagogy, curriculum, curriculum-design, professional development, WPA, assignments
45. Cozza, Vanessa. (2020). English 402: Technical and Professional Writing [course design]. Composition Studies 48.3, 103-115.
Annotation: This course design offers an innovative approach to using client-based projects (CBPs) in technical and professional writing. It shows how teachers can incorporate CBPs in hybrid or fully virtual instruction, adapt it for a quarter or semester, and tailor it to meet students' needs. The course introduces students to and develops their skills in workplace writing, including, "[in] some cases … simply learning that a client company maintains common styles and strategies for all written work" (Wojahn et al. 132). While there are standard writing assignments, such as letters, memos, progress reports, and job application materials, other writing activities assigned depend on the CBP. These projects can involve creating operation manuals, employee handbooks, event planning guides, rewriting gaming instructions, summarizing scientific reports, producing website content, and/or compiling annotated bibliographies. The CBPs' topics vary as well, ranging from distillery operations to seed funding to grant writing.
Keywords: techcom, client-based, collaboration, experiential, situated, immersive, adaptability, community, online, bizcom, science-writing, grant-writing
46. Cozza, Vanessa. (2020). English 402: Technical and Professional Writing [course design]. Composition Studies 48.3, 103-115.
Annotation: This course design offers an innovative approach to using client-based projects (CBPs) in technical and professional writing. It shows how teachers can incorporate CBPs in hybrid or fully virtual instruction, adapt it for a quarter or semester, and tailor it to meet students' needs. The course introduces students to and develops their skills in workplace writing, including, "[in] some cases … simply learning that a client company maintains common styles and strategies for all written work" (Wojahn et al. 132). While there are standard writing assignments, such as letters, memos, progress reports, and job application materials, other writing activities assigned depend on the CBP. These projects can involve creating operation manuals, employee handbooks, event planning guides, rewriting gaming instructions, summarizing scientific reports, producing website content, and/or compiling annotated bibliographies. The CBPs' topics vary as well, ranging from distillery operations to seed funding to grant writing.
Keywords: techcom, client-based, collaboration, experiential, situated, immersive, adaptability, community, online, bizcom, science-writing, grant-writing
47. Cozza, Vanessa. (2020). English 402: Technical and Professional Writing [course design]. Composition Studies 48.3, 103-115.
Annotation: This course design offers an innovative approach to using client-based projects (CBPs) in technical and professional writing. It shows how teachers can incorporate CBPs in hybrid or fully virtual instruction, adapt it for a quarter or semester, and tailor it to meet students' needs. The course introduces students to and develops their skills in workplace writing, including, "[in] some cases … simply learning that a client company maintains common styles and strategies for all written work" (Wojahn et al. 132). While there are standard writing assignments, such as letters, memos, progress reports, and job application materials, other writing activities assigned depend on the CBP. These projects can involve creating operation manuals, employee handbooks, event planning guides, rewriting gaming instructions, summarizing scientific reports, producing website content, and/or compiling annotated bibliographies. The CBPs' topics vary as well, ranging from distillery operations to seed funding to grant writing.
Keywords: techcom, client-based, collaboration, experiential, situated, immersive, adaptability, community, online, bizcom, science-writing, grant-writing
48. Cozza, Vanessa. (2020). English 402: Technical and Professional Writing [course design]. Composition Studies 48.3, 103-115.
Annotation: This course design offers an innovative approach to using client-based projects (CBPs) in technical and professional writing. It shows how teachers can incorporate CBPs in hybrid or fully virtual instruction, adapt it for a quarter or semester, and tailor it to meet students' needs. The course introduces students to and develops their skills in workplace writing, including, "[in] some cases … simply learning that a client company maintains common styles and strategies for all written work" (Wojahn et al. 132). While there are standard writing assignments, such as letters, memos, progress reports, and job application materials, other writing activities assigned depend on the CBP. These projects can involve creating operation manuals, employee handbooks, event planning guides, rewriting gaming instructions, summarizing scientific reports, producing website content, and/or compiling annotated bibliographies. The CBPs' topics vary as well, ranging from distillery operations to seed funding to grant writing.
Keywords: techcom, client-based, collaboration, experiential, situated, immersive, adaptability, community, online, bizcom, science-writing, grant-writing
49. Diaz, Veronica. (2020). [book review]. Enculturation 30. http://enculturation.net/review_participatory_composition
Keywords: Participatory Composition: Video Culture, Writing, and Electracy by Sarah J. Arroyo
50. Donnelly, Samantha. (2020). [book review]. College Composition and Communication 71.4, 675-678.
Keywords: The Embodied Playbook: Writing Practices of Student Athletes, by J. Michael Rifenburg, wcenter, tutor, literacy, embodiment, body
51. Duffy, William. (2020). Practically Wise and Good: Understanding Phronesis as a Rhetorical Virtue. After Plato: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing (pp. 37-50).
Keywords: rhetorical ethics; phronesis; BLM; virtue ethics
52. Edwards, Dustin W. (2020). Digital rhetoric on a damaged planet: Storying digital damage as inventive response to the anthropocene. Rhetoric Review 39.1, 59-72. https://doi.org/10.1080/07350198.2019.1690372
Keywords: digital, cultural rhetorics, story, rhetoric, rhetorical-theory
53. Ferris, Dana; Amy Lombardi. (2020). Collaborative Placement of Multilingual Writers: Combining Formal Assessment and Self-Evaluation. Journal of Writing Assessment 13.1. http://journalofwritingassessment.org/article.php?article=149
Annotation: Placement of multilingual writers within writing programs is an important and challenging issue. If students perceive that the placement process is rigid and unfair, this perception may affect their attitudes and motivation levels while taking courses in the writing program. The purpose of this study was to see whether a specific subgroup of students (n = 65) in a large university writing program for multilingual students could be successful if allowed to collaborate, with guidance, in their own placement. Various data were collected about these students in their first quarter after matriculating in the writing program: instructors’ initial ratings, students’ outcomes in their initial course (final portfolio scores and course grades), and students’ satisfaction levels with their placement after they had completed the course (via a brief survey). These data were compared to another group of students (n = 65) who received similar placement scores but were not given the choice to move up or down a level. Findings indicated the pilot group was able to succeed at their chosen course level at levels comparable to the comparison group, and they were happy with their placement choices. Implications for placement processes in multilingual writing programs are discussed.
Keywords: multilingual writers, writing assessment, directed self-placement, placement processes, student agency
54. Friedrich, Linda; Scott Strother. (2020). Measuring Civic Writing: The Development and Validation of the Civically Engaged Writing Analysis Continuum. Journal of Writing Assessment 13.1. http://journalofwritingassessment.org/article.php?article=144
Annotation: As youth increasingly access the public sphere and contribute to civic life through digital tools, scholars and educators are rethinking how civically engaged writing is taught, nurtured, and assessed. This article presents the conceptual underpinnings of the National Writing Project’s Civically Engaged Writing Analysis Continuum (CEWAC), a new tool for assessing youth’s civically engaged writing. It defines four attributes of civically engaged writing using qualitative analysis of expert interviews and literature: employs a public voice, advocates civic engagement or action, argues a position based on reasoning and evidence, and employs a structure to support a position. The article also presents reliability and validity evidence for CEWAC. The study finds that CEWAC has a moderate to high level of exact agreement and a high level of exact or adjacent agreement. Covariation analyses showed that, even with similar scoring patterns, CEWAC’s attributes hold at least a moderate level of independence. This evidence, coupled with robust qualitative evidence around reliability and validity, establish CEWAC’s strong technical properties. The findings suggest that CEWAC can be used both in research and in the classroom to make visible attributes of civically engaged writing often overlooked in traditional assessment frameworks.
Keywords: public writing, civic engagement, writing assessment, rubric, reliability
55. Hambrick, Keira M. (2020). Book Review—Literacy and Mobility: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Agency at the Nexus of High School and College by Brice Nordquist. Literacy in Composition Studies 08.1, 72-75. https://doi.org/10.21623/1.8.1.6
Annotation: Book Review
Keywords: Literacy; Agency; Power; Education; Place; Rhetorical Space; High-School; Mobility; Diversity; School-College; Standardized;
56. Harding, Lindsey; Robby Nadler; Paula Rawlins; Elizabeth Day; Kristen Miller; Kimberly Martin. (2020). Revising a Scientific Writing Curriculum: Wayfinding Successful Collaborations with Interdisciplinary Expertise. College Composition and Communication 72.2, 333-368.
Annotation: Interdisciplinary collaborations to help students compose for discipline-specific contexts draw on multiple expertise. Science, technology, education, and mathematics (STEM) programs particularly rely on their writing colleagues because 1) their academic expertise is often not writing and 2) teaching writing often necessitates a redesigning of existing instructional materials. While many writing studies scholars have the expertise to assist their STEM colleagues with such tasks, how to do so—and, more fundamentally, how to begin such efforts—is not commonly focused on in the literature stemming from these collaborations. Our article addresses this gap by detailing an interdisciplinary Writing in the Disciplines (WID) collaboration at a large, public R1 university between STEM and writing experts to redesign the university's introductory biology writing curriculum. The collaborative curriculum design process detailed here is presented through the lens of wayfinding, which concerns orientation, trailblazing, and moving through uncertain landscapes according to cues. Within this account, a critical focus on language—what we talk about when we talk about writing—emerges, driving both the collaboration itself and resultant curricular revisions. Our work reveals how collaborators can wayfind through interdisciplinary partnerships and writing curriculum development by transforming differences in discipline-specific expertise into a new path forward.
Keywords: science-writing, interdisciplinary, WID, WAC, STEM, collaboration, curriculum design
57. Heard, Matthew M. (2020). Rhetoric and the rise of foster care. Rhetoric Review 39.1, 16-30. https://doi.org/10.1080/07350198.2020.1686595
Keywords: hospitality, activism, activist, rhetoric, rhetorical-theory
58. Kareem, Jamila M. (2020). Independent Black Institutions and Rhetorical Literacy Education: A Unique Voice of Color. Literacy in Composition Studies 08.1, 1-20. https://doi.org/10.21623/1.8.1.2
Annotation: The bulk of literacy education historical narratives about Black Americans has been gentrified by mainstream Euro-American perspectives. This article considers the contributions of a Black-American-developed form of institutionalized community education to demonstrate the critical race theory voice-of-color thesis in college-level composition-literacies education. Through reviewing the curricular, pedagogical, and instructional practices of pre-college independent Black institutions, the author works to reclaim the unique rhetorical voice of this Afrocentric literacy education form and insert it into American literacy education histories. The article presents two established unique voice of color counter-stories grounded in truthfully representing and advancing Black American cultures to argue that central features of these Afrocentric literacy education programs can afford college composition programs race- and community-conscious writing education.
Keywords: community literacy; education; literacy; counter-cultural; rhetorical-studies; racial-theory; African-Am;
59. Langdon, Lance; Lloyd, Jens. (2020). Walk Local, Argue Local: A Campus-Based Prompt for a Basic Writing Course. Prompt, 4.2, 13-22. https://doi.org/10.31719/pjaw.v4i2.65
Annotation: This assignment deploys place-based pedagogy in a basic writing course, and enacts it through first-person research in the form of a walking tour of a university campus. Students first read and discuss two texts about their campus: an article analyzing campus architecture and a philosophical treatise about the campus park. Students then marshal evidence gathered through a walking tour to argue with one of these texts. In addition to bolstering students' confidence for contesting claims advanced by authorities, this assignment encourages students and teachers alike to cultivate a more deliberate awareness of their surroundings. Because this assignment is meant to be grounded in a specific locale, instructors adapting this prompt are encouraged to seek out texts addressing their own institutional settings.
Keywords: campus, basic writing, place-based, argument
60. Leibovits, Inbal. (2020). [book review]. Rhetoric Review 39.1, 122-124. https://doi.org/10.1080/07350198.2020.1686598
Keywords: Homeless Advocacy and the Rhetorical Construction of the Civic Home, by Melanie Loehwing, rhetoric, advocacy, civic engagement
61. Leonhardy, Galen. (2020). The Trial: An Examination of Administrative Power, Labor Law, Free Speech, and Academic Freedom in a Community College Context. Enakshi Sengupta and Patrick Blessinger. Faculty and Student Research in Practicing Academic Freedom Volume 31, Bingley UK, Emerald Publishing Limited (pp. 121-137). https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/S2055-364120200000031019/full/html?skipTracking=true
Annotation: This essay offers a subjective literary exploration of personal events relevant to understanding an assault on academic freedom in a two-year college. The critically qualitative inquiry focuses on two events: (a) the questioning by English faculty of dual credit policies and (b) an administratively engineered disciplinary action that functioned to have a chilling effect on free speech and to, thereby, quell academic freedom. The dual credit story comes in the form of an embedded narrative essay previously published as a Facebook note. That embedded essay presents the tale of the author and a colleague, the advisor for their community college newspaper, exercising their academic freedom to critically engage a community college administration's violations of Illinois State dual credit laws. The embedded essay serves also to reveal an administrative response to the English professors' decision to report the violation of state law to the Higher Learning Commission and the Illinois Community College Board. Following that, the essay provides a qualitative examination of the administrative response and explains how the response served to quell academic freedom.
Keywords: Free speech, Academic freedom, Dual Credit, Educational leadership, Stanley Fish, Authoritarianism, Activism, English Education, Kafka, Community college,
62. Maffetone, Elizabeth; Rachel McCabe. (2020). Learning Institutional Ecologies for Inventive Collaboration in Writing Center/Classroom Collaboration. Composition Studies 48.3, 53-69.
Annotation: This article explores how knowledge of institutional ecologies can help build connections across departments of large universities without direct communication. The authors, an instructor and a writing center tutor, consider "inventive collaboration"—impromptu work mediated by student writing—as a way to improve a multilingual student's writing. This experience serves as a test case to highlight how the rhetorical strategies of inventive collaboration can improve students' rhetorical attunement, awareness of audience, and agency over their writing. While the authors recognize the uniqueness of their indirect collaboration, they also offer an assessment of the institutional and individual components that allowed for this collaboration to take place.
Keywords: Inventive collaboration, university ecologies, first-year writing, writing centers, writing program administration and training, institutional ethnography, rhetorical awareness
63. Maffetone, Elizabeth; Rachel McCabe. (2020). Learning Institutional Ecologies for Inventive Collaboration in Writing Center/Classroom Collaboration. Composition Studies 48.3, 53-69.
Annotation: This article explores how knowledge of institutional ecologies can help build connections across departments of large universities without direct communication. The authors, an instructor and a writing center tutor, consider "inventive collaboration"—impromptu work mediated by student writing—as a way to improve a multilingual student's writing. This experience serves as a test case to highlight how the rhetorical strategies of inventive collaboration can improve students' rhetorical attunement, awareness of audience, and agency over their writing. While the authors recognize the uniqueness of their indirect collaboration, they also offer an assessment of the institutional and individual components that allowed for this collaboration to take place.
Keywords: Inventive collaboration, university ecologies, first-year writing, writing centers, writing program administration and training, institutional ethnography, rhetorical awareness
64. Maffetone, Elizabeth; Rachel McCabe. (2020). Learning Institutional Ecologies for Inventive Collaboration in Writing Center/Classroom Collaboration. Composition Studies 48.3, 53-69.
Annotation: This article explores how knowledge of institutional ecologies can help build connections across departments of large universities without direct communication. The authors, an instructor and a writing center tutor, consider "inventive collaboration"—impromptu work mediated by student writing—as a way to improve a multilingual student's writing. This experience serves as a test case to highlight how the rhetorical strategies of inventive collaboration can improve students' rhetorical attunement, awareness of audience, and agency over their writing. While the authors recognize the uniqueness of their indirect collaboration, they also offer an assessment of the institutional and individual components that allowed for this collaboration to take place.
Keywords: Inventive collaboration, university ecologies, first-year writing, writing centers, writing program administration and training, institutional ethnography, rhetorical awareness
65. Maffetone, Elizabeth; Rachel McCabe. (2020). Learning Institutional Ecologies for Inventive Collaboration in Writing Center/Classroom Collaboration. Composition Studies 48.3, 53-69.
Annotation: This article explores how knowledge of institutional ecologies can help build connections across departments of large universities without direct communication. The authors, an instructor and a writing center tutor, consider "inventive collaboration"—impromptu work mediated by student writing—as a way to improve a multilingual student's writing. This experience serves as a test case to highlight how the rhetorical strategies of inventive collaboration can improve students' rhetorical attunement, awareness of audience, and agency over their writing. While the authors recognize the uniqueness of their indirect collaboration, they also offer an assessment of the institutional and individual components that allowed for this collaboration to take place.
Keywords: Inventive collaboration, university ecologies, first-year writing, writing centers, writing program administration and training, institutional ethnography, rhetorical awareness
66. Marsellas, Nick. (2020). Preempting Racist and Transphobic Language in Student Writing and Discussion: A Review of Alex Kapitan's The Radical Copyeditor's Style Guide for Writing about Transgender People and Race Forward's Race Reporting Guide. Literacy in Composition Studies 08.1, 76-80. https://doi.org/10.21623/1.8.1.7
Annotation: Book Review
Keywords: Rhetorical; Style-Gude; Racial-Theory; Inclusion; Gender; Writing-Studies; Transgender; Language-Awareness;
67. Meghan Owenz. (2020). Analyzing a memoir of disability: Utilizing a group writing assignment to increase applicability and comprehension of course material. Prompt, 4.1, 50-59. https://doi.org/10.31719/pjaw.v4i1.57
Annotation: "Analyzing a Memoir of Disability" is a semester-long project that promotes learning about disability and culture through group reading and writing about a single memoir. Students in an Introduction to Rehabilitation and Human Services course completed a textual analysis by using a memoir and course textbook to contextualize one another. Writing was framed as a collaborative, multi-step process that cycles through writing, discussing, and writing again. Students were required to regularly integrate course concepts with their assigned memoir readings to prepare for their in-class book club meetings. The project culminated in a formal group paper of 5-7 pages. Despite some logistical challenges, the project was well received, highlighted by many students as their favorite part of the course, and appeared to ignite a passion for reading, writing, and the material under study in many students.
Keywords: PEDAGOGY, REFLECTIVE PRACTICE, ASSIGNMENT-WRITING, ASSIGNMENT, WID, DISABILITY, AUTOBIOGRAPHY-WRITING, LIFE-NARRATIVE
68. Miller, Katarina L. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.1, 136-140. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/br_miller.pdf
Keywords: Re/Orienting Writing Studies: Queer Methods, Queer Projects, edited by William P. Banks, Matthew B. Cox, and Caroline Dadas, LGBTQ, Queer, Methods
69. Moon, Sarah. (2020). Book Review - Food, Feminisms, Rhetorics, edited by Melissa A. Goldthwaite. Literacy in Composition Studies 08.1, 67-71. https://doi.org/10.21623/1.8.1.5
Annotation: Book Review
Keywords: Food; Cooking; Cookbook; Feminist; Gendered; Kairos; Rhetorical; Rhetorical Convention; Body;
70. Pak, Michael. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.1, 141-144. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/br_pak.pdf
Keywords: Serendipity in Rhetoric, Writing, and Literacy Research, by Maureen Daly Goggin and Peter N. Goggin, Research, Literacy, time
71. Pavia, Catherine Matthews. (2020). The “My Online Friends” religious enclave: Expanding the definition and possibilities of enclaved discourses. Rhetoric Review 39.1, 88-100. https://doi.org/10.1080/07350198.2019.1690375
Keywords: ethnography, women, social networking, discourse, agency, rhetoric, rhetorical-theory
72. Perelman, Les. (2020). The BABEL Generator and E-Rater: 21st Century Writing Constructs and Automated Essay Scoring (AES). Journal of Writing Assessment 13.1. http://journalofwritingassessment.org/article.php?article=145
Annotation: Automated essay scoring (AES) machines use numerical proxies to approximate writing constructs. The BABEL Generator was developed to demonstrate that students could insert appropriate proxies into any paper, no matter how incoherent the prose, and receive a high score from any one of several AES engines. Cahill, Chodorow, and Flor (2018), researchers at Educational Testing Service (ETS), reported on an Advisory for the e-rater AES machine that can identify and flag essays generated by the BABEL Generator. This effort, however, solves a problem that does not exist. Since the BABEL Generator was developed as a research tool, no student could use the BABEL Generator to create an essay in a testing situation. However, testing preparation companies are aware of e-rater’s flaws and incorporate the strategies designed to help students exploit these flaws. This test prep does not necessarily make the students stronger writers just better test takers. The new version of e-rater still appears to reward lexically complex, but nonsensical essays demonstrating that current implementations of AES technology continue to be unsuitable for scoring summative, high stakes writing examinations.
Keywords: Automated essay scoring (AES), BABEL generator, writing constructs, writing assessments, fairness
73. Pouncil, Floyd. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.1, 145-148. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/br_pouncil.pdf
Keywords: Black Perspectives in Writing Program Administration: From the Margins to the Center, edited by Staci M. Perryman-Clark and Colin Lamont Craig, WPA, JWPA, Black-Studies, African-Am, FYC
74. Reardon, Kristina; Vanessa Guardado-Menjivar. (2020). Perceptions of Fairness in Summer Bridge Classrooms with Contract Grades. Journal of Writing Assessment 13.2. http://journalofwritingassessment.org/article.php?article=153
Annotation: [Author's Abstract] This narrative explains how a summer bridge student turned writing fellow effectively communicated peers' comments about fairness in grading to her former professor as she prepared to teach her summer bridge writing course again. Co-authored by the instructor and undergraduate student, this reflection explores both undergraduate understandings of fairness in the context of contract grading as well as the teacher-student relationship. Both teacher and student advocate for the use of contract grading in summer bridge writing classrooms. However, they argue that systems of grading need to be clarified and contextualized for pre-college students who sometimes express confusion about college standards and/or may overextend lessons learned during their first college course to their fall semester when not all professors will use contract grading.
Keywords: fairness, equity, perception, summer bridge, early start, writing-fellow, revision, contract, grading, peer-tutor
75. Robert Boyd, Christopher Basgier, Claire Wilson. (2020). Repurposing scientific writing in conservation biology. Prompt, 4.1, 3-17. https://doi.org/10.31719/pjaw.v4i1.53
Annotation: Scientists and writing studies scholars agree that students need to be able to repurpose scientific knowledge across audiences, goals, and genres. This article offers a much-needed, practical example of an assignment that allows students to work towards these goals. Working collaboratively, a faculty member from biology, a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) administrator, and an Encyclopedia of Alabama (EOA) editor redesigned a conservation biology course assignment around communication with multiple audiences. The assignment required students to produce a webpage about a rare species in Alabama that fulfills the technical, scientific writing component of the course and then repurpose that webpage into an entry for EOA aimed at a non-expert audience. We elaborate on the context in which the repackaging assignment developed, explain how it fits with student learning outcomes in biology, and share themes we noticed in students' reflections on the practice of repurposing their writing.
Keywords: PEDAGOGY, REFLECTIVE PRACTICE, ASSIGNMENT-WRITING, ASSIGNMENT, WID, BIOLOGY / BIOLOGICAL, BIOLOGY-COURSE, BIOLOGY-WRITING
76. Roger Chao. (2020). Analyzing physical spaces as a means of understanding rhetoric. Prompt, 4.1, 18-28. https://doi.org/10.31719/pjaw.v4i1.54
Annotation: The following collaborative project is designed to encourage students to investigate how rhetoric functions in everyday locations. Specifically, this assignment prompts students to document, analyze, and present the physical design and makeup of "privately owned public spaces" (POPS), a unique categorization of community spaces that is promoted as simultaneously private and public. The benefits of completing this assignment are multifaceted: students are given the opportunity to experience learning beyond the confines of the classroom, and students are able to practice rhetorical analysis on physical locations, thereby learning how rhetoric functions beyond written or verbal discourse and attuning them to the social contexts of public spaces.
Keywords: PEDAGOGY, REFLECTIVE PRACTICE, ASSIGNMENT-WRITING, ASSIGNMENT, RHETORIC / RHETORICAL, SPACE
77. Schaffer, Martha Wilson. (2020). Chapter 5. Encouraging Potential in Liminal Space: Student Writer Reflection. In Jo-Anne Kerr & Ann M Amicucci (Eds.), Stories from First-Year Composition: Pedagogies that Foster Student Agency and Writing Identity (pp. 91-104). https://doi.org/10.37514/PRA-B.2020.0308.2.05
Annotation: How does liminality--the state of in-betweenness--inform students’ trajectories and potentiality as writers? Further still, how do writers’ histories, self-perceptions, and personal goals (which are sometimes in conflict with instructor and institutional outcomes) inform a writer’s development when said writer is not quite a novice and not yet an expert? In a qualitative case study, Schaffer explores these questions through a framework of potentiality (Haswell & Haswell, 2010). Extending from her own “growing pains'' and uncertainties as a novice teacher of writing, Schaffer finds that her exigence to better understand her own liminality is one shared, though often unseen and unnamed, in students enrolled in first-year writing courses. Interviewing four students enrolled in the second of a three-course academic writing sequence, Schaffer codes and analyzes student participants’ narratives to discover, just as she had, that students were unable to assess their current and/or past performance in identity formation without also envisioning their future identities as writers--their identities as writers in the present moment were bound to their perceptions of their potential to be a certain kind of writer. Though Schaffer’s study is small, her findings suggest yet another method to extend, support, and better understand what Yancey (2014) terms reflection-in-action: reviewing, revising, and projecting alongside the composing process.
Keywords: potentiality, liminality, first-year writing
78. Shelledy, Maggie. (2020). If it hadn't been for writing, I think I would have lost my mind': Resilient dwelling and rhetorical agency in prison writing. Enculturation 30. http://enculturation.net/If_It_Hadnt_Been_for_Writing
Keywords: prison writing, prisoners, agency, incarceration
79. Turner, Anne. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.1, 149-152. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/br_turner.pdf
Keywords: Rhetorical Feminism and This Thing Called Hope, by Cheryl Glenn, feminism, feminist
80. Uehling, Karen. (2020). CBW Archives. https://wac.colostate.edu/comppile/archives/cbw-archives/
Annotation: The CBW archive contains The CBWS/CBW Newsletter from 1982-1998, as well as additional historical material, such as the original flyer Charles Guilford produced to advertise CBW or the call to convention of the 4th National Basic Writing Conference, sponsored by CBW. As far as I know, The Newsletter is not available in libraries. Issues now exist only in personal collections of old materials. Paper copies were becoming tattered, so to preserve the information, the newsletter was scanned into a (now nonexistent) CBW website as an archive in 2001.
Keywords: basic-writing, developmental, basic, conference on basic writing, cbw, archive
Annotation: Brief history of CBW (Conference on Basic Writing) from 1980 to 2020 and a detailed history from 1980-2005
Keywords: basic-writing, developmental, basic, conference on basic writing, cbw, history
82. Valeri, Laura. (2020). [book review]. College Composition and Communication 72.1, 150-158.
Keywords: Investigative creative writing: Teaching and practice, by Mark Spitzer
83. West-Puckett, Stephanie and Genoa Shepley. (2020). RADICAL MUSEOLOGY/RADICAL PEDAGOGY: Curating Beyond Boundaries. Journal of Multimodal Rhetorics 4.1 [special issue: a multimodal practice for socially-engaged action], 273-328. http://journalofmultimodalrhetorics.com/4-1-issue-west-puckett-shepley
Annotation: In this born-digital project, we use the practices, genres, and logics of exhibition as an organizing framework for communicating a subversive approach to writing pedagogy. We have selected, arranged, interpreted, and juxtaposed artifacts from museums and from the University of Rhode Island (URI) first-year writing curriculum that tell a disjointed and fragmented story about what social justice work is possible in both museums and schools. In keeping with our work to disrupt normative writing instruction practices, we cultivate here dis-orientation, dis-census, and dis-obedience as necessary dispositions for unlearning and unmaking hegemony in the classroom. We invite participants to experience these affective dimensions of radical pedagogy and listen to the “noise” as they step into a three-dimensional virtual reality (VR) classroom we developed with the open-source platform Artsteps. As a corollary to the VR exhibition, the exhibition catalogue further contextualizes and interprets the artifacts, theorizing the productive juxtaposition of radical museology and radical pedagogy. See below for tips for viewing virtual exhibitions in Artsteps.
Keywords: multimodal, rhetoric, pedagogy, writing, museology, first-year writing
84. Whicker, John H. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.1, 153-156. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/br_whicker.pdf
Keywords: Next Steps: New Directions for/in Writing about Writing, edited by Barbara Bird, Doug Downs, I. Moriah McCracken, and Jan Rieman, WAW
85. White-Farnham, Jamie. (2020). TEACHING CONVENTIONS, TEACHING CRITIQUE: A SUBTLY SUBVERSIVE DRESS CODE ASSIGNMENT IN A PROFESSIONAL WRITING CLASS. Journal of Multimodal Rhetorics [special issue: dress practices as multimodal rhetorics], 187-196. http://journalofmultimodalrhetorics.com/3-2-issue-white-farnham
Annotation: Since examples of workplace discrimination currently abound in the news -- for instance, in regards to trans people’s bathroom use as well as “acceptable” gendered clothing—attention to the complicated politics surrounding dress codes forms the first half of the dress code assignment. Students learn of the conversation around workplace discrimination by studying examples of resistance and comparing them to accommodations listed in the Equal Opportunity Employment Act. The second part of the assignment is to actually create dress codes. Here, the assignment foregrounds rhetorical concepts such as purpose and context, orienting students away from deeming articles of clothing and, by extension, people and bodies, "in/appropriate." Considering the relationship between dress practices and rhetoric, this essay offers an explanation of how I attend to the twin goals of creating professional documents and resisting hegemonic dress practices when I teach the dress code as a multimodal rhetorical project.
Keywords: multimodal, rhetoric, pedagogy, teaching, professional writing, assignment, dress practices, embodiment, workplace, discrimination
86. White-Farnham, Jamie. (2020). The New "Available Means": Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 140-146. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/white-farnham_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Provocations of Virtue: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing, by John Duffy, After Plato: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing, edited by John Duffy and Lois Agnew, ethics, rhetoric, discourse, pedagogy, classical-rhetoric
87. White-Farnham, Jamie. (2020). The New "Available Means": Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 140-146. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/white-farnham_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Provocations of Virtue: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing, by John Duffy, After Plato: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing, edited by John Duffy and Lois Agnew, ethics, rhetoric, discourse, pedagogy, classical-rhetoric
88. White-Farnham, Jamie. (2020). The New "Available Means": Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 140-146. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/white-farnham_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Provocations of Virtue: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing, by John Duffy, After Plato: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing, edited by John Duffy and Lois Agnew, ethics, rhetoric, discourse, pedagogy, classical-rhetoric
89. White-Farnham, Jamie. (2020). The New "Available Means": Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 140-146. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/white-farnham_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Provocations of Virtue: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing, by John Duffy, After Plato: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Teaching of Writing, edited by John Duffy and Lois Agnew, ethics, rhetoric, discourse, pedagogy, classical-rhetoric
90. Wible, Scott. (2020). Using Design Thinking to Teach Creative Problem Solving in Writing Courses. College Composition and Communication 71.3, 399-425.
Annotation: Integrating design thinking methodology into writing courses can help students to develop creative approaches to problem definition and solution development. Tracing how students work with and through written genres common to design thinking reveals the possibilities and potential of learning new patterns of inquiry and argumentation. Developing these creative habits of mind empowers students to explore and invent solutions to complex, multidimensional problems across the broad range of their disciplinary, professional, and civic lives.
Keywords: design, creativity, habits of mind, Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing, professional-writing, writing-minor, upper-division, multimodal, genre
91. Wilkes, Lydia. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 147-150. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/wilkes_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Changing the Subject: A Theory of Rhetorical Empathy, by Lisa Blankenship, rhetoric, empathy, composition-studies, personal essay, difference, story-telling
92. Wilkes, Lydia. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 147-150. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/wilkes_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Changing the Subject: A Theory of Rhetorical Empathy, by Lisa Blankenship, rhetoric, empathy, composition-studies, personal essay, difference, story-telling
93. Wilkes, Lydia. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 147-150. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/wilkes_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Changing the Subject: A Theory of Rhetorical Empathy, by Lisa Blankenship, rhetoric, empathy, composition-studies, personal essay, difference, story-telling
94. Wilkes, Lydia. (2020). [book review]. Composition Studies 48.3, 147-150. https://compositionstudiesjournal.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/wilkes_48.3.pdf
Keywords: Changing the Subject: A Theory of Rhetorical Empathy, by Lisa Blankenship, rhetoric, empathy, composition-studies, personal essay, difference, story-telling
95. Wood, Shane A. (2020). Labor-Based Grading Contracts: Building Equity and Inclusion in the Writing Classroom [book review]. Journal of Writing Assessment 13.1. http://journalofwritingassessment.org/article.php?article=142
Annotation: Grading writing, or judging language, can be difficult. Asao B. Inoue’s Labor-Based Grading Contracts problematizes traditional assessment practices that assess writing “quality.” Inoue explains how this type of practice operates to reproduce White supremacy because language standards are tied to historical White racial formations. He suggests an alternative assessment method (e.g., grading contracts) that is based on labor and compassion. If you find yourself dissatisfied with classroom grading practices or wanting to understand how writing assessment can be constructed to do social justice work, then Inoue’s Labor-Based Grading Contracts is a great read.
Keywords: grading contracts, race, writing assessment, labor
96. Young, Debra Diamond; Rachel Morgan. (2020). The Impact of Critical Community-Engaged Writing on Student Understanding of Audience. Composition Studies 48.3, 35-52.
Annotation: In this study, we examine the use of community-engaged writing pedagogy and the authentic, contextualized writing projects it creates to determine if students better understand the concept of audience and incorporate that foundational knowledge into their writing process. Thematic analysis of student reflections and interviews found students view academic writing as a test of skills, but view community-engaged writing as a product with a purpose in the world. We also learned students need to understand the position of their writing within a rhetorical situation to successfully incorporate the concept of audience into their writing processes. Finally, students revealed they focus most on audience during the revision process and that community-engaged writing provides students with the incentive and rhetorical situation necessary to develop a more impactful revision process. These findings will help composition instructors identify academic results in community-engaged pedagogy, while the process orientation of the study provides a better understanding of how students incorporate the concept of audience into their writing with implications beyond community-engaged writing courses.
Keywords: Community-engaged Writing, Service-learning, Composition, First-year Writing, Revision, Writing Process, Audience
97. Young, Debra Diamond; Rachel Morgan. (2020). The Impact of Critical Community-Engaged Writing on Student Understanding of Audience. Composition Studies 48.3, 35-52.
Annotation: In this study, we examine the use of community-engaged writing pedagogy and the authentic, contextualized writing projects it creates to determine if students better understand the concept of audience and incorporate that foundational knowledge into their writing process. Thematic analysis of student reflections and interviews found students view academic writing as a test of skills, but view community-engaged writing as a product with a purpose in the world. We also learned students need to understand the position of their writing within a rhetorical situation to successfully incorporate the concept of audience into their writing processes. Finally, students revealed they focus most on audience during the revision process and that community-engaged writing provides students with the incentive and rhetorical situation necessary to develop a more impactful revision process. These findings will help composition instructors identify academic results in community-engaged pedagogy, while the process orientation of the study provides a better understanding of how students incorporate the concept of audience into their writing with implications beyond community-engaged writing courses.
Keywords: Community-engaged Writing, Service-learning, Composition, First-year Writing, Revision, Writing Process, Audience
98. Young, Debra Diamond; Rachel Morgan. (2020). The Impact of Critical Community-Engaged Writing on Student Understanding of Audience. Composition Studies 48.3, 35-52.
Annotation: In this study, we examine the use of community-engaged writing pedagogy and the authentic, contextualized writing projects it creates to determine if students better understand the concept of audience and incorporate that foundational knowledge into their writing process. Thematic analysis of student reflections and interviews found students view academic writing as a test of skills, but view community-engaged writing as a product with a purpose in the world. We also learned students need to understand the position of their writing within a rhetorical situation to successfully incorporate the concept of audience into their writing processes. Finally, students revealed they focus most on audience during the revision process and that community-engaged writing provides students with the incentive and rhetorical situation necessary to develop a more impactful revision process. These findings will help composition instructors identify academic results in community-engaged pedagogy, while the process orientation of the study provides a better understanding of how students incorporate the concept of audience into their writing with implications beyond community-engaged writing courses.
Keywords: Community-engaged Writing, Service-learning, Composition, First-year Writing, Revision, Writing Process, Audience
99. Young, Debra Diamond; Rachel Morgan. (2020). The Impact of Critical Community-Engaged Writing on Student Understanding of Audience. Composition Studies 48.3, 35-52.
Annotation: In this study, we examine the use of community-engaged writing pedagogy and the authentic, contextualized writing projects it creates to determine if students better understand the concept of audience and incorporate that foundational knowledge into their writing process. Thematic analysis of student reflections and interviews found students view academic writing as a test of skills, but view community-engaged writing as a product with a purpose in the world. We also learned students need to understand the position of their writing within a rhetorical situation to successfully incorporate the concept of audience into their writing processes. Finally, students revealed they focus most on audience during the revision process and that community-engaged writing provides students with the incentive and rhetorical situation necessary to develop a more impactful revision process. These findings will help composition instructors identify academic results in community-engaged pedagogy, while the process orientation of the study provides a better understanding of how students incorporate the concept of audience into their writing with implications beyond community-engaged writing courses.
Keywords: Community-engaged Writing, Service-learning, Composition, First-year Writing, Revision, Writing Process, Audience
100. Aikens, Kristina. (2019, January 15). Prioritizing Antiracism in Writing Tutor Education. In Johnson, Karen G.; Ted Roggenbuck (Eds.), How We Teach Writing Tutors: A WLN Digital Edited Collection. https://wlnjournal.org/digitaleditedcollection1/Aikens.html
Annotation: Kristina Aikens draws from personal experience, survey data and other input from writing tutors, and published scholarship to argue that antiracist pedagogy, based on discussions of the complex relationships between writing in the academy and institutionalized oppression, must be central to the project of educating writing tutors.
Keywords: writing center, writing fellows, course, antiracism, graduate writing consultants, tutor education