WAC Bibliography

Welcome to the WAC Bibliography. The bibliography, developed and presented in collaboration with CompPile, was developed to support teachers across the disciplines who are interested in using writing and speaking in their courses; scholars who are interested in WAC theory and research; and program administrators, designers, and developers who have interests in the latest work in faculty outreach, program design, and assessment.

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Category: Inquiry

Your search found 39 citations.

1. Adams, Pauline Gordon; Emma Shore Thornton. (1986). An inquiry into the process of collaboration. Language Arts of Michigan 02, 25-28.
Keywords: collaboration, questionnaire, teacher-opinion, WAC, data, discipline, gender, age, inquiry
2. Alaimo, Peter J., Bean, John C., Langenhan, Joseph M., & Nichols, Larry. (2009). Eliminating Lab Reports: A Rhetorical Approach for Teaching the Scientific Paper in Sophomore Organic Chemisty. The WAC Journal, 20(1), 17-32. https://doi.org/10.37514/WAC-J.2009.20.1.02
Annotation: Considers how an interdisciplinary team of faculty is striving to improve student performance on senior chemistry theses at Seattle University through an alternative approach to teaching the discourse of the scientific community within the year-long sophomore chemistry lab course. Drops the notion of teaching new students in formulaic, academic-specific ways, through utilization of rudimentary lab reports. Stresses the need to make students immediately aware of the inquiry-based, persuasive context of actual professional work and writing through collaborative-based experimentation that stresses multiple replications and use of evidence for conclusions. Suggests teaching the scientific paper over a year early in students' science careers and prioritizing students' 'writing process knowledge' through explicit instruction in writing within science courses. [Jaclyn Rossi]
Keywords: Seattle University, WAC, science-writing, sophomore, organic chemistry-course, laboratory-report, assignment, grading, inquiry, rubric, evaluation, response, data, process,
3. Allen, Michael; William Condon; Marcia Dickson; Cheryl Forbes; George Meese; Kathleen Blake Yancey. (1997). Portfolios, WAC, email, and assessment: An inquiry on Portnet. In Yancey, Kathleen Blake; Irwin Weiser (Eds.), Situating portfolios: Four perspectives; Logan, UT: Utah State University Press (pp. 370-384).
Keywords: portfolio, WAC, email, evaluation, listserv, Portnet, inquiry
4. Anson, Chris M.; Deanna P. Dannels. (2004). The heart of the matter: Writing, speaking, and inquiry-guided learning. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 219-228).
Keywords: inquiry-based, communications, WAC, speak-write, pedaagogy
5. Ash, Sarah L.; Patti H. Clayton. (2004). Service-learning: Integrating inquiry and engagement. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 229-243).
Keywords: inquiry-based, service-learning, pedagogy, student-engagement, WAC
6. Bensel-Meyers, Linda; Donald Samson; University of Tennessee, Learning Research Center. (1988). The role of rhetoric in academic inquiry: The philosophy and effect of the writing to learn program at UTK [University of Tennessee, Knoxville). ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 364 176.
Keywords: write-to-learn, University of Tennessee Knoxville, WAC, program, pedagogy, liberal arts, inquiry, philosophy
7. Blanchard, Susan; Marilee Bresciani; Michael Carter; Virginia S. Lee; Gerry Luginbuhl. (2004). Inquiry-guided learning and the undergraduate curriculum: General education and the major. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 183-205).
Keywords: inquiry-based, pedagogy, undergraduate, gen-ed, WAC, academic major, undergraduate
8. Bogad, Lesley; Jennifer S. Cook; Monica G. Darcy; Janet Donnell Johnson; Susan K. Patterson; Mary Ellen Tillotson. (2007). Finding our way as WAC-y women: Writing practice and other collegial endeavors. Across the Disciplines 04. https://wac.colostate.edu/atd/articles/bogadetal2007.cfm
Annotation: This article describes our experiences as six faculty members at a mid-sized state college whose collaboration grew into a substantive endeavor to improve writing pedagogy and practice across our disciplines of English, Educational Studies, Instructional Technology, Educational Psychology and Counseling. Within our practice, we approach writing in a variety of ways, including: letter writing; writing as an advanced organizer; online journal writing; rhetorical writing; and writing for critical inquiry. Also embedded within our practice is our creation of and participation in a professional community of learners. In our conclusion, we consider both the personal lessons we have learned through this collaboration and the institutional policies and practices that can support and sustain this kind of work.
Keywords: WAC, women, interdisciplinary, genre, activity-analysis, English-studies, Education, Instructional Psychology, Counseling, psychology
9. Carter, Michael. (2007). Ways of knowing, doing, and writing in the disciplines. College Composition and Communication 58.3, 385-418.
Annotation: Drawing on the North American genre theories of Carolyn Miller, David Russell, and Charles Bazerman, as well as eight years’ work with outcomes descriptions and assessments, Carter proposes that disciplines define themselves by the genres or intellectual actions central to their work. This definition has several implications: (a) it defies the late 19th century notion of university disciplines as static bodies of declarative knowledge; (b) it forwards the more recent sense of disciplines as collaborations of scholars engaged in ongoing work; (c) it draws attention to the act of writing as the means by which the essential work of all disciplines is realized; (d) it makes it inevitable that all faculty are teachers of writing; and (e) it suggests fruitful areas of cooperation among disciplines. After describing the many genres through which intellectual work is realized, Carter describes four metagenres (Problem Solving, Empirical Inquiry, Research from Sources, Performance) that name intellectual actions common to many disciplines. He suggests that by concentrating on these metagenres, university specialists in WID can help all faculty better understand and teach the genres in which they are engaged and for which they are responsible. The article closes with an appendix listing program outcomes from three academic departments at NCSU, Carter’s home institution. [A. Patricia Burnes, Supporting Undergraduate Writers Beyond the First Year, WPA-CompPile Research Bibliographies, No. 6]
Keywords: WID, discipline, genre, meta, multidisciplinary, cross-discipline, Dave R. Russell, Carolyn R. Miller, Charles Bazerman, WAC, epistemological, write-to-learn, outcomes
10. Davis, Meredith; Paul Tesar. (2004). Inquiry by design: Learning in the studio setting. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 173-182).
Keywords: inquiry-based, WAC, studio, art-course, design, pedagogy
11. Downs, Douglas; Elizabeth Wardle. (2007). Teaching about writing, righting misconceptions: (Re)envisioning 'First-Year Composition' as 'Introduction to English Studies'. College Composition and Communication 58.4, 552-584.
Annotation: Downs and Wardle describe WAW curricula that extend beyond students reading and writing about existing scholarship in rhetoric and composition (cf. Dew) to having students conduct primary research on related topics. They frame the pedagogy as an ‘Introduction to Writing Studies’ that explicitly rejects the traditional FYC goal of teaching a universal academic discourse and instead seeks to teach (1) metacognition about writing via procedural and declarative knowledge of writing, and (2) a version of the activity of inquiry that centers universities and spans disciplines. The article theorizes the shortcomings of traditional FYC courses in terms of genre and activity theory and describes WAW curricula that can better respond to these theories of how writing works and thus needs to be learned. It then reports on early results from the curriculum as taught in multiple sections at three institutions, illustrating effects through two particular student experiences in the course. Student feedback and results suggest that the WAW curriculum results in increased self-awareness about writing, improved reading abilities and confidence, and raised awareness of researched writing as conversation. The article concludes with challenges that the curriculum presents, including the challenging nature of the course for students, the resulting imperfections in student work, limited textbook support for the approach, and the need for extensive instructor preparation. [Doug Downs, Writing-About-Writing Curricula: Origins, Theories, and Initial Field-Tests, WPA-CompPile Research Bibliographies, No. 12]
Keywords: FYC, pedagogy, WAW, writing-studies, objective, metacognition, activity-theory, genre-theory, curriculum, student-opinion, data, case-study, self-evaluation, research-awareness, student-confidence, gain, needs-analysis, teacher-training, academic, AP English, content-analysis, contextual, basic-skills, honors, recursive, reflection, rhetorical, skill-transfer, writing-studies, WAC, WID, Charles Bazerman, Larry Beason, Carol Berkenkotter, John Dawkins, Linda Flower, James Paul Gee, Christian Haas, John R. Hayes, Thomas N. Huckin, George Lakoff, Mark Johnson, Sondra Perl, John Swales, misunderstanding
12. Flower, Linda & Heath , Shirley Brice. (2000). Drawing on the Local: Collaboration and Community Expertise. Language and Learning Across the Disciplines, 4(3), 43-55. https://doi.org/10.37514/LLD-J.2000.4.3.04
Annotation: A short history of community/university collaboration is buried in the phrase .service learning.. In the grammar of its implied narrative, the agent, actor, and source of expertise--the server--is the academy not the community. And the act of learning is more often a personal reflection by students on a broadening experience than it is a public act of shared knowledge making. But what if we attempted to turn the tables: to transform service into a collaboration with communities and learning into a problem-driven practice of mutual inquiry and literate action? And what would it take to do so? Our reflection on this issue comes in part from watching these questions come to life in an unusual forum--a community problem-solving dialogue with 180 stakeholders, including leaders in the urban community, leaders and staff from city youth organizations, and university faculty and students.
Keywords: WAC, WID, writing across the curriculum, collaboration, community service, service-learning, academy-community, academy-public, expertise
13. Greene, David B.; Virginia S. Lee; J. Douglas Wellman. (2004). Inquiry-guided learning at North Carolina State University: A brief history. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 17-29).
Keywords: inquiry-based, pedagogy, North Carolina State University, history, WAC
14. Gulla, Amanda, Pinhasi-Vittorio, Limor, & Zakin, Andrea. (2009). Exploring Relationships between Aesthetic Education and Writing Across the Curriculum Using Poetry. Across the Disciplines, 6(3), 1-15. https://doi.org/10.37514/ATD-J.2009.6.3.19
Annotation: Three professors in three different education departments within their college's Division of Education found that combining two different approaches to learning in two university-wide faculty development programs in which they participated, Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) and Lincoln Center Institute's aesthetic education program, not only enhanced each pedagogical approach but also provided an integrated inquiry process that deepened teacher candidates' understanding of the craft and methods of teaching. In this article, they share the benefits of integrating WAC and aesthetic education in their respective courses, by highlighting different vignettes of their classrooms where poetry serves as the vehicle for this integrated inquiry process involving the arts.
Keywords: WAC, interdisciplinary, education-department, aesthetic, arts, poetry, pedagogy, poetry
15. Haviland, Carol Peterson; Sherry Green; Barbara Kime Shields; M. Todd Harper. (1999). Neither missionaries nor colonists nor handmaidens: What writing tutors can teach WAC faculty about inquiry. In Barnett, Robert W.; Jacob S. Blumner (Eds.), Writing centers and writing across the curriculum programs: Building interdisciplinary partnerships; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (pp. 45-58).
Keywords: WAC, wcenter, organizational, inquiry, 'missionary', 'colonist', 'handmaiden', discipline-metaphor, interdisciplinary, tutor-knowledge, teacher-tutor, cross-disciplinary, tutoring
16. Hess, George R.; C. Ashton Drew. (2004). Inquiry-guided learning through collaborative research in a graduate course. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 115-128).
Keywords: WAC, inquiry-based, pedagogy, collaborative, researching, graduate
17. Hyman, Michael; Gerry Luginbuhl. (2004). Inquiry-guided learning and the undergraduate major in the Department of Microbiology. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 129-142).
Keywords: inquiry-based, WAC, microbiology-course, undergraduate, pedagogy, undergraduate
18. Kennedy, Ana; Susan Navey-Davis. (2004). Inquiry-guided learning and the foreign language classroom. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 71-80).
Keywords: inquiry-based, L2-course, foreign language, pedagogy, WAC
19. Kirkman, Adrianna G.; Medwick V. Byrd; Hasan Jameel; John A. Heirmann. (2004). The challenge of implementing an inquiry-guided approach in a highly technical curriculum. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 157-172).
Keywords: inquiry-based, technical-communication, WAC, pedagogy
20. Kirscht, Judy; Rhonda Levine; John Reiff. (1994). Evolving paradigms: WAC and the rhetoric of inquiry. College Composition and Communication 45.3, 369-380.
Keywords: WAC, individual, consensus, paradigm, voice, process, form, rhetoric, inquiry, conflict, inquiry, paradigm
21. Kramer, Jonathan; Alison Arnold. (2004). Music 200 'Understanding Music': An inquiry-guided approach to music appreciation. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 41-50).
Keywords: inquiry-based, pedagogy, WAC, music-course, music appreciation
22. Lee, Virginia S. (2004). Assessing the impact of inquiry-guided learning at NCSU [North Caroline State University]. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 259-275).
Keywords: inquiry-based, WAC, program-validation, North Caroline State University]
23. Lee, Virginia S. (2004). Mastering inquiry-guided learning one step at a time: Faculty development and dissemination. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 245-258).
Keywords: inquiry-based, learning-theory, faculty-growth, pedagogy, dissemination, WAC
24. Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.). (2004). Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors. Sterling, VA: Stylus.
Keywords: pedagogy, pedagogy, guidelines, inquiry-based, WAC
25. Lee, Virginia S.; David B. Greene; Janice Odom; Ephraim Schechter; Richard W. Slatta. (2004). What is inquiry-guided learning?. In Lee, Virginia S. (Ed.), Teaching and learning through inquiry: A guidebook for institutions and instructors; Sterling, VA: Stylus (pp. 3-16).
Keywords: inquiry-based, pedagogy, definition, learning-theory, WAC
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