WAC Clearinghouse News & Information

Dan MelzerThe WAC Clearinghouse News and Updates section is a place to find information about current WAC conferences, retreats, calls for submissions, publications, and a variety of other events of interest to the WAC community.

I encourage WAC Clearinghouse members to send me information to post on this page. If you would like to announce a WAC conference or retreat, advertise a new WAC publication, put out a call for submissions to a WAC book or journal, or have any other news of interest to the WAC community, please send me the information at dlmelzer@aol.com.

-- Dan Melzer
News and Information Editor

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The Latest News

WAC SIG at CCCC
For more information: http://center.uoregon.edu/NCTE/2016CCCC/program/search_results.ph ...
You are Invited to Attend the International Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum (WAC) Programs Special Interest Group at the Conference on College Composition and Communication Thursday, April 7, 6:30-7:30pm (see conference program for room number) This will be the 36th annual SIG meeting of the International (formerly National) Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum (WAC) Programs at CCCC. Since 1981, this CCCC SIG has offered a unique opportunity for those who lead WAC/WID efforts at schools, colleges, and universities or those who wish to begin or re-start such initiatives. Aside from a few announcements of upcoming events of interest at the beginning of the session, the SIG meeting takes place in small discussion groups facilitated by members of the Network Consultants Board (highly-experienced program leaders). These groups address questions and concerns of the participants in regard to any aspect of the development and sustaining of WAC/WID initiatives and programs. In addition, occasional discussion groups in recent years have considered such efforts as writing of the CCCC-endorsed Statement of WAC Principles and Practices in 2012-14. Over the past ten years, this SIG has consistently drawn 35, 50, or more participants. Since the SIG was renamed "International" in 2005, approximately one quarter to one third of participants each year have come from institutions outside the U.S. Moreover, attending the SIG serves as an important step for those just beginning initiatives at their institutions, with approximately one half of participants each year self-identifying in this role. The names listed in the proposal, in addition to the chair, are the members of the Board who will lead the discussion groups. They are not "speakers," but "facilitators" or "discussion leaders." Presenter(s) • Chair: Chris Thaiss University of California Davis • Discussion Leader: Vicki Tolar Burton Oregon State University, Corvallis • Discussion Leader: Pam Childers The WAC Clearinghouse • Discussion Leader: Michelle Cox Cornell University • Discussion Leader: Jeffrey Galin Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton • Discussion Leader: Anne Ellen Geller St. John's University, New York, NY • Discussion Leader: Dan Melzer UC Davis • Discussion Leader: David Russell Iowa State University, Ames • Discussion Leader: Martha Townsend University of Missouri, Columbia • Discussion Leader: Terry Zawacki George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
Special issue of Across the Disciplines on Performing and Visual Arts
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/performing_arts/index.cfm.
Announcing the release of the Across the Disciplines Special Issue "Create, Perform, Write: WAC, WID, and the Performing and Visual Arts," full text available at http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/performing_arts/index.cfm. From the home page: Performing and visual arts programs across the country ask students at all levels to write about the artistic domains they inhabit. From undergraduates taking introductory arts courses, to MFA students writing theses and academic journal articles, thousands of students nationwide are creating and performing art—witnessing an array of creative processes, performances and exhibitions—and attempting to write about their experiences. This special issue delivers articles from contributors who explore connections between the teaching and learning of writing and the performing and visual arts in the classroom or studio, in writing centers, and elsewhere across the disciplines. Thirteen authors energetically perform theoretical and literature-review focused pieces, case studies, and innovative multimodal hybrid webtexts.
WAC SIG at the Conference on College Composition and Communication
For more information: http://www.ncte.org/cccc/conv

Meeting of the International Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs at the Conference on College Composition and Communication

Indianapolis, Indiana, JW Marriott, room 301

This annual meeting is intended to give leaders of new and established WAC/WID programs at any level and in any locale the opportunity to ask questions and share information about any aspect of WAC/WID program development and operation. Having met annually at CCCC since 1981, we have averaged 40-60 attendees each of the past ten years, always about half of these representing new WAC/WID initiatives. The members of the Network's consultants board serve as small-group facilitators during the meeting.

New Issue of Across the Disciplines on Anti-Racist Activism
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

The editors of Across the Disciplines are pleased to announce the publication of a new special issue on the topic of "Anti-Racist Activism: Teaching Rhetoric and Writing," guest edited by Frankie Condon (University of Waterloo) and Vershawn Ashanti Young (University of Kentucky).

To quote from Young/Condon's introduction:

"Despite widely circulated pronouncements of the death of racism in the U.S. following the election of President Barack Obama, politicians continue to appeal to race as a means of galvanizing their (predominantly white) bases, legislation across the States taps into deeply held racist beliefs and connects those beliefs with notions of citizenship and national identity, and efforts are underway nationwide to limit the ability of teachers and students to study the history of race and racism in the U.S. as well as the cultural and scholarly production of artists and intellectuals of color. This special issue helps meet a pressing need to continue and deepen a critical dialogue about race matters, particularly in classrooms that take up the pedagogical aims of synthesis, analysis, argumentation, persuasion and presentation, in short, the teaching of rhetoric and writing."

 
We invite you to read and explore the perspectives offered by the following contributors:
Introduction: Why Anti-Racist Activism? Why Now?
Vershawn Ashanti Young and Frankie Condon
Re-Framing Race in Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum
Mya Poe
"Going there": Peer Writing Consultants' Perspectives on the New Racism and Peer Writing Pedagogies
The Legion of "Going There" (Phil Zhang, Jessie St. Amand, J Quaynor, Talisha Haltiwanger, Evan Chambers, Geneva Canino, and Moira Ozias)
Critical Race Theory Counterstory as Allegory: A Rhetorical Trope to Raise Awareness About Arizona's Ban on Ethnic Studies
Aja Martinez
Deconstructing Whiteliness in the Globalized Classroom
Dae-Joong Kim and Bobbi Olson
Making Commitments to Racial Justice Actionable
Rasha Diab, Thomas Ferrel, Beth Godbee, and Neil Simpkins
-- 

Dr. Michael A. Pemberton, Professor
Editor, Across the Disciplines
Director, University Writing Center
Department of Writing & Linguistics, P.O. Box 8026
Georgia Southern University
Statesboro, GA 30460
(912) 478-1383
michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu
CFP: Writing center Theory and Practice
For more information: http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/center2.htm

Call for Papers: Writing Center Theory and Practice

The Winter 2013 (Vol. 17, Iss. 4) Issue of Academic Exchange Quarterly, an independent double-blind-peer-reviewed print journal, is now accepting submissions for its special section on Writing Center Theory and Practice.  Articles may explore issues of theory, practice, and experience in writing center work, including qualitative and empirical studies and discussions of pedagogy.

Articles may also consider the following: How writing center professionals cope with change and the eventuality of needing to expand their efforts in response to new economic and demographic challenges.  Furthermore, as we move towards increasingly virtual and technologically dependent learning communities, how can these efforts help meet the evolving demands of our students? 

In addition to Writing Center Directors and other Administrators, submissions are welcome from professional staff, faculty tutors, and graduate students who work in the writing center.  Manuscript length should be between 2,000 and 3,000 words.  Please identify your submission with the keyword “Center-2.”

Submissions will be accepted now until the end of August; however, early submissions are encouraged as they offer the following incentives:

  • longer time for revision
  • opportunity to be considered for Editor’s Choice
  • eligibility to have article’s abstract and/or full text posted on journal’s main webpage
  • opportunity to be considered for inclusion in Sound Instruction Series

For more information, please visit http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/center2.htm, or email Feature Editor and Sound Instruction Book Editor Kellie Charron at kajr10@comcast.net

 

WAC SIG at CCCC
For more information: http://www1.ncte.org/cccc/program/Default.aspx

Meeting of the International Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs


Session: FSIG.6 on Mar 23, 2012 from 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM


Since 1981, the Network has met annually at 4Cs to provide participants the opportunity to share questions, concerns, and successes related to any aspect of the design and operation of writing-across-the-curriculum and writing-in-disciplines initiatives at any level and in any locale, in the U.S. or internationally. Attendance at the SIG has averaged more than 30 in recent years (in 2011 we had about 50 participants), with roughly half of these identifying their institutions as just beginning WAC/WID initiatives. This attendance and the percentage of first-time participants reflect the continuing vitality of the SIG. 

The session features a small-group format, with members of the Board of Consultants facilitating these discussions. In most cases, small groups are intended to give each participant the opportunity to speak and to have questions and concerns addressed by the facilitators and group. In 2011, we augmented this arrangement with two small groups on specific topics: "writing-embedded" curricula and drafting of a statement of principles of WAC/WID programs (for submission to CCCC for possible adoption as a position statement). 


Participant Affiliation Speech Title (if known)
Chris Thaiss
(Chair)
UC Davis Chair-Facilitator
Pamela Childers
(Chair)
Lesley Universty Facilitator
Jeffrey Galin
(Speaker 1)
Florida Atlantic University Facilitator
Anne Ellen Geller
(Speaker 2)
St. John's University Facilitator
Dan Melzer
(Speaker 3)
CSU Sacramento Facilitator
David Russell
(Speaker additional)
Iowa State University Facilitator
Terry Zawacki
(Speaker additional)
George Mason University Facilitator
Teresa Redd
(Speaker additional)
Howard University Facilitator
Mary McMullen-Light
(Speaker additional)
MCC-Longview Community College Facilitator
Vicki Tolar Burton
(Speaker additional)
Oregon State Unversity Facilitator
Martha Townsend
(Speaker additional)
University of Missouri Facilitator
Michelle Cox
(Speaker additional)
Bridgewater State University Facilitator

Special Issue of Across the Disciplines: WAC and Second Language Writing
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

The editors of Across the Disciplines are pleased to announce the publication of a new special issue, guest edited by Michelle Cox and Terry Zawacki, on the topic of "WAC and Second Language Writing: Cross-field Research, Theory, and Program Development."  As the co-editors say in the issue's abstract:



Anyone currently teaching in or running a writing program at a U.S. university will be familiar with the discourse around the globalization of higher education and will also have experienced the presence of increasingly larger numbers of residential and visa second language students in WID and composition classrooms. This special issue responds to calls for WAC and L2 writing professionals to engage in cross-field scholarship and program building to better understand and address the complexities of writing across languages, cultures, and disciplines, as we strive to support multilingual writers across the curriculum.

The table of contents for this special issue includes:


Introduction
Terry Myers Zawacki and Michelle Cox

WAC: Closing Doors or Opening Doors for Second Language Writers?
Michelle Cox

Lessons for WAC/WID from Language Learning Research: Multicompetence, Register Acquisition, and the College Writing Student 
Jonathan Hall and Nela Navarro

Interpersonal Stance in L1 and L2 Students' Argumentative Writing in Economics: Implications for Faculty Development in WAC/WID Programs
Zak Lancaster

How Faculty Attitudes and Expectations toward Student Nationality Affect Writing Assessment
Peggy Lindsey and Deborah Crusan

Teaching and Learning with Multilingual Faculty
Anne Ellen Geller

Attitudes about Graduate L2 Writing in Engineering: Possibilities for More Integrated Instruction
Jay Jordan and April Kedrowicz

"Striking while the iron is hot" A Writing Fellows Program Supporting Lower-Division Courses at an American University in the UAE
Lynne Ronesi

Mapping the Gaps in Services for L2 Writers
Marty Patton

Writing at UC Davis: Addressing the Needs of Second Language Writers
Dana Ferris and Chris Thaiss

WAC Journal Seeks Funding
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/

 

WAC Journal Seeks Funding in Order to Continue

The WAC Journal, for the first time in 23 years, has no funding for next year's volume. We need $6,000 a year to continue.

If you can contribute any dollar amount to support The WAC Journal, please send a check or money order payable to The WAC Journal Fund. Contributions are tax-deductible. Mail contributions to:

The WAC Journal Fund
c/o NWP-NH, English Dept., MSC 40
Plymouth State University
Plymouth, NH 03264

Sincerely,

Roy Andrews, editor, The WAC Journal
Meg Petersen, Plymouth State University, and Director of the National Writing Project in New Hampshire
David Zehr, Associate Vice President for Undergraduate Studies, Plymouth State University
Carol Rutz, Carleton College
Neal Lerner, Northeastern University
Pat Donahue, Lafayette College
Jacob Blumner, University of Michigan-Flint 
John Eliason, Gonzaga University
Rebecca Noel, Plymouth State University
Robert Miller, Plymouth State University

Special Issue of Across the Disciplines
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

The editors of Across the Disciplines are pleased to announce the publication of a new special issue, guest edited by Magnus Gustafsson, collecting papers presented at the 2011 ICL/CLIL (Integrating Content and Language/Content and Language Integrated Learning) colloquium in Cape Town, South Africa:



Nine papers explore recurring issues of collaboration in the effort of integrating language and content for disciplinary learning and the development of discourse expertise. Recurring topics include exploring research methodologies, theoretical frameworks, and findings from a range of situated educational contexts. Findings suggest the need for a shared discursive and interdisciplinary space to support the negotiation of collaborative practices and to facilitate the analysis of potential (in)congruencies between the disciplines involved. Findings further emphasize how integrated approaches promote the development of discursive and professional identity and that sustained institutional support is necessary.

This issue's table of contents includes:


Collaborating for Content and Language Integrated Learning: The Situated Character of Faculty Collaboration and Student Learning
Magnus Gustafsson, Andreas Eriksson, Christine Räisänen, and Ann-Charlotte Stenberg, Cecilia Jacobs, Jenny Wright, Bridget Wyrley-Birch, and Chris Winberg

Research and Development in an ICL Project: A Methodology for Understanding Meaning Making in Economics
Moragh Paxton

Learning Together: Lessons from a Collaborative Curriculum Design Project
Brenda Leibowitz, Vivienne Bozalek, Ronelle Carolissen, Lindsey Nicholls, Poul Rohleder, Toke Smolders, and Leslie Swartz

A Case Study of a Research-based Collaboration Around Writing in Social Work
Theresa Lillis and Lucy Rai

Interdisciplinarity as a Lens for Theorizing Language/Content Partnerships
Marie C. Paretti

Engineering and Language Discourse Collaboration: Practice Realities
Marcelle Harran

Learning as Accessing a Disciplinary Discourse: Integrating Academic Literacy into Introductory Physics Through Collaborative Partnership
Delia Marshall, Honjiswa Conana, Rohan Maclons, Mark Herbert, and Trevor Volkwyn

Issues of Discourse: Exploring Mixed Messages in the Interests of Collaboration
Susan Van Schalkwyk, Juanita Bezuidenhout, Hugo Botha, and Gerrit I. Van Schalkwyk

Critical Components of Integrating Content and Language in Spanish Higher Education
Immaculada Fortanet-Gómez

The Disciplinary Literacy Discussion Matrix: A Heuristic Tool for Initiating Collaboration in Higher Education
John Airey

Across the Disciplines Issue 8.1
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

Across the Disciplines is pleased to announce the publication of issue 8.1 (2011), consisting of the collected articles published from January through June 2011.  In addition to the pieces by Katherine Gottschalk and Anne-Marie Pedersen which appeared earlier in the year, we have just published three additional articles, each of which focuses on writing in the STEM fields:

Proofs and Persuasion: A Cross-Disciplinary Analysis of Math Students' Writing, Patrick Bahls, Amy Mecklenburg-Faenger, Meg Scott-Copses, and Chris Warnick.

This article offers an initial analysis of the rhetorical devices used by mathematics undergraduates as they begin to write research articles in their discipline and identifies both convergences and divergences writing in the disciplines of mathematics and composition and rhetoric. (Published June 27, 2011)

"It's a Shame to Put Such Wonderful Thoughts in Such Poor Language": A Chemist's Perspective on Writing in the Discipline Roland P. Stout.

Written from the perspective of a chemist, this paper presents a process for developing and using writing assignments as thinking and learning tools. The examples are taken from a wide range of chemistry courses and include both learning objectives and evaluation methods. (Published June 27, 2011)

From Concept to Application: Student Narratives of Problem-solving as a Basis for Writing Assignments in Science Classes, Jennifer Rich, Daisy Miller, and Lisa DeTora.

This study utilizes a speak-aloud protocol to examine the use of writing to encourage metacognition in math and science. The authors identify three distinct cognitive processes at work as students talk through their approaches to answering math and science questions and suggest approaches to encourage metacognition through writing in science classes. (Published June 27, 2011)
CFP: Writing Center Theory and Practice
For more information: http://www.rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/center2.htm

CFP: Writing Center Theory and Practice

   
 
The Winter 2011 Issue of Academic Exchange Quarterly, an independent double-blind-peer-reviewed print journal, is now accepting submissions for the special section on Writing Center Theory and Practice.  Articles may explore issues of theory, practice, and experience in writing center work, including qualitative and empirical studies and discussions of pedagogy.  We are especially interested in articles which examine how the founding and funding of writing centers influence who the center will serve and why.  Consider the following questions in your response:
?  How is the usage of the writing center tracked at your institution, and who are these figures reported to?
? Do these figures determine the “worth” of the writing center within the school community, both literally and figuratively?
? What happens when the faculty at your institution does not support the writing center?  
 
In addition to Writing Center Directors and other administrators, we welcome submissions from professional staff, faculty tutors, and graduate students who work in the writing center. Article length should be between 2,000 and 3,000 words. Please identify your submission with the keyword “CENTER-2.”
 
Submissions are accepted any time until the end of August; however, early submissions are encouraged as they offer the following incentives:
- - longer time for revision
- - opportunity to be considered for Editor’s Choice, at no cost to the author
- - eligibility to have article’s abstract and/or full text posted on journal’s main web page
- - opportunity to be considered for inclusion in Sound Instruction Series
 
 
Best regards,
Kellie Charron
Feature Editor

International Network of WAC programs SIG at CCCC
For more information: http://www.ncte.org/cccc/conv

The International (formerly National) Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs has met at the CCCC convention each year since 1981. The popular small-group format continues to draw each year 40-70 participants, including program planners from a range of countries. In the small groups, each led a member of the INWAC Board of Consultants (all very experienced program leaders from a broad range of institutions within and outside the US), participants ask and receive answers to their questions regarding any aspect of beginning, sustaining, re-starting, or expanding their WAC/WID initiatives. The meeting also provides a short amount of time for announcement of conferences, research opportunities, and publications of interest to WAC program developers.

When: April 8, 2011 from 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM

Where: CCCC convention in Atlanta (check program for room location)

Special Issue of Across the Disciplines
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

Across the Disciplines is pleased to announce the publication of its latest special issue, devoted to “Writing Across the Curriculum at the Community Colleges: Beating the Odds,” edited by Clint Gardner (Salt Lake City Community College).

“Writing across the curriculum and writing in the disciplines (WAC/WID) programs in community colleges have been the focus of only sporadic scholarship over the years. While there are a smattering of articles, a handful of doctoral dissertations, and a few books devoted to the subject (mostly from the late 80's and mid-90's), substantial research on WAC/WID from a community college perspective seems seriously lacking in comparison to research that has been conducted in other postsecondary settings. Given the pervasive teaching mission that all community colleges share, the collaborative drive that many experienced faculty from across the disciplines display, and the community college's specific commitment to general education, it seems certain that a great deal of WAC/WID work is taking place in community colleges, even if that work is not specifically referred to on campus as "WAC" or "WID." In this issue of Across the Disciplines, therefore, we focus the spotlight on community college WAC/WID initiatives and expand the range of scholarly work in this area, exploring the challenges that community college WAC programs face, the ways in which student demographics and goals shape their experience of writing in the disciplines, and what the future of WAC/WID might be at the community college level.”

The table of contents for this issue includes:

Crossing the Great Divide: Critical Thinking and Writing in the Majors Third Biennial International Conference
For more information: http://www.quinnipiac/edu/wac

Quinnipiac University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Presents Crossing the Great Divide: Critical Thinking and Writing in the Majors Third Biennial International Conference Friday, November 19th and Saturday, November 20, 2010 Quinnipiac University, Hamden CT.

This multi-disciplinary conference is framed around the linkages between critical thinking, usually associated with general education, and thinking within the majors—the disciplinary thinking students must master before they graduate. We are calling this move from general education to major study “crossing the great divide” because students often find that what they are asked to master in their major differs in focus and complexity from the critical thinking pedagogies that most general education curricula require of undergraduates. Because thinking and writing are not separable, but instead mutually contain and continuously stretch our teaching and student’s learning, the 2010 conference will explore the dynamic possibilities of assessing, promoting, and measuring writing and thinking across the great general education/major divide. In addition to addressing this large question, conference presenters will provide practical, researched-based techniques and strategies that promote critical thinking and writing in a variety of contexts across the spectrum of liberal arts and sciences. 
 
For additional information, visit our website: www.quinnipiac/edu/wac; or, contact Paul Pasquaretta, Coordinator of the Quinnipiac University Research and Writing Institute, at 203-582-8509, or via email at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
IWCA Muriel Harris Outstanding Service Award Call for Nominations

IWCA Muriel Harris Outstanding Service Award Call for Nominations (deadline: July 1, 2010)

Named after its first recipient, the Muriel Harris Outstanding Service Award recognizes outstanding service that has benefited the international writing center community in significant and broad-based ways. The award is given at every other IWCA conference.

All nominations should be submitted electronically to Al DeCiccio, chair of the committee, at adeciccio@svc.edu and should include the following:

  • A letter of nomination that includes the name and institution of the nominee, your personal knowledge of or experience with the nominee’s service contributions to the writing center community, and your name, institutional affiliation and email address.
  • Detailed support documents (maximum of 5 pages). These may include excerpts from a curriculum vitae, workshop or published material, stories or anecdotes, or original work by the nominee.
  • Other letters of support (optional, but limited to 2)

All materials must be received by Al DeCiccio, chair of the IWCA Muriel Harris Outstanding Service Award committee, by July 1, 2010.  The winner of the Award will be announced at the 2010 IWCA/NCPTW Conference, in Baltimore.

Read about the history of the MHOSA in Writing Lab Newsletter 34.7, pp. 6-7 .

CFP: Special Issue of Across the Disciplines
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

Call for Proposals

A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Spring/Fall 2011

 

Writing across the Curriculum and Second Language Writers

 

Guest editors: Michelle Cox, Bridgewater State College; and Terry Myers Zawacki, George

Mason University

 

Along with the current drive to internationalize higher education has come a heightened institutional concern for the writing of our second language (L2) students. While there has been a recent burgeoning of research on L2 writers, the focus has been mainly on how these writers fare in composition courses. We know that L2 writers also write across the curriculum, in the majors, and in graduate programs, and yet there is still only a small body of research focused on these contexts. Given the increasing numbers of both residential and visa second language writers in higher education as well as the growing understanding of the complexities of writing across languages, cultures, and disciplines, we have a pressing need for more research from composition and L2 writing perspectives that explores the experiences of L2 writers and the expectations of faculty who teach these writers across the curriculum.

 

To that end, we invite proposals for articles that explore questions such as the following, as well as others related to the topic of Writing across the Curriculum/Writing in the Disciplines and second language writers:

 

·         What are the experiences of second language writers as they write across the curriculum, in the disciplines, in graduate programs, in internships, and in the workplace after they graduate? In what ways do these experiences relate to language and culture? How do these experiences compare with those of native English speaking (NES) students?

·         What challenges do second language writers face as they write across the curriculum, across the disciplines, and in graduate programs? 

·         What resources do second language writers bring to writing across the curriculum, in the disciplines, and in graduate programs?

·         What are the attitudes and expectations of faculty across the disciplines for second language writers? To what extent might these attitudes and expectations differ by discipline, level of course, and genres of writing?

·         How might faculty attitudes and expectations for second language writers influence the design of writing assignments, their response and grading practices, writing assessment, and the use of in-class writing activities?

·         What approaches have WAC/WID administrators found successful in supporting faculty as they work with second language writers across the curriculum and what challenges have they faced in this effort?

·         How do WAC/WID programs assess the success of WAC/WID programming in relation to second language students? 

·         What efforts are being made/should be made to incorporate second-language writing concerns into the development of large-scale writing assessment plans?

·         How do second language writers fare on large-scale assessments of writing in the disciplines?  

·         What is the history of WAC/WID support of second language writing at your institution?

·         What are successful models of collaboration between WAC/WID programs and other programs that support second language students, such as ESL programs, first year writing programs, writing centers, diversity programs, and programs at local school districts?

·         How do the parallel areas of inquiry of WAC, WID, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), and English for Specific Purposes (ESP) inform each other? Where do they depart? What productive connections have been made/might be made?

 

We welcome proposals focused on these and other questions related to the intersections between WAC/WID and second language writing theory, research, pedagogy, and program administration as these pertain to L2 writers of academic English. We especially welcome collaborations between WAC scholars and L2 writing scholars. 

 

Deadline for Proposals: May 15, 2010

 

Notification of Acceptance: by July 2010

 

Manuscripts Due: December 15, 2010

 

Publication: Spring/Fall 2011

 

Proposal Format: Please submit a one-page proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article. Proposals and manuscripts should follow APA documentation style, which is the standard for Across the Disciplines. Send your proposal electronically (in MS Word format) to guest editors Michelle Cox (michelle.cox@bridgew.edu) and Terry Myers Zawacki (tzawacki@gmu.edu), and the editor of ATD, Michael Pemberton (michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu). Please be sure to include your full contact information.

 

2010 IWCA Collaborative @ CCCC
For more information: http://writingcenters.org/2010/01/iwca-cccc-2010-save-the-date/

We are happy to announce that The 2010 IWCA Collaborative @ CCCC
program and registration information is now posted on the IWCA website
http://writingcenters.org/2010/01/iwca-cccc-2010-save-the-date/.
 
The program features sessions that are relevant to all writing center
professionals and include topics such as:
 
--Making a case for centers in times of high stakes testing,
assessment, and budget crises
 
--Identifying and rethinking best practices in tutoring and tutor training
 
--Understanding difference in writing center practice
 
--Implementing technology in the center
 
We are also pleased to share that our featured lunch-time speaker is
Carol Mattingly, founder of the Writing Centers Research Project.
 
Registration for the Collaborative includes morning coffee and tea
service, lunch, and an evening reception with light appetizers and
cash bar.
 
We hope you'll join us for a full day of thinking, talking,
collaborating, and resource sharing.
 
The IWCA Collaborative @ CCCC will be held on March 17, 2010 at the Galt
House in Louisville, KY.
 
Please direct any questions to co-chairs, Nathalie Singh-Corcoran (Nathalie.Singh-Corcoran@mail.wvu.edu) and  Karen Rowan (krowan@csusb.edu).
This listserv is for board members of IWCA only. If you have problems with your emails from this list, contact meodice@ou.edu.

Special Issue of ATD: WAC and Assessment
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/assessment/index.cfm
Across the Disciplines is pleased to announce the publication of a special issue on “Writing Across the Curriculum and Assessment: Activities, Programs, and Insights at the Intersection” ( http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/assessment/index.cfm), guest edited by The Florida State University Editorial Collective (Kathleen Blake Yancey; Emily Baker; Scott Gage; Ruth Kistler; Natalie Syzmanski; Kara Taczak; and Jill Taylor).  As the editors explain in the issue’s preface,
In 1997, Brian Huot and Kathleen Blake Yancey published their co-edited volume Assessing Writing across the Curriculum: Diverse Approaches and Practices. In this volume, contributors explored various ways of assessing WAC programs, moving theoretically, ethnographically, administratively, and rhetorically to document the efficacy of such programs. During the last decade, we've seen this work expand, in the process frequently leading to new WAC-related innovations. Several programs, for example. have moved from WAC to CAC­from Writing across the Curriculum to Communication across the Curriculum­so as to incorporate multiple kinds of communication into a writing-rich but not writing-exclusive curriculum. Other WAC programs, like George Mason University's and North Carolina State University's, have used assessment activities as one component in a larger WAC research study. And still others, like researchers at the University of Hawaii, have focused on the student experience, drawing from collective interviews new lessons for WAC administrators and program designers. In sum, the last decade has produced new ways of thinking about WAC as well as new ways of thinking about how to assess WAC. This special issue of ATD explores how assessment can help us understand, support, and enrich all such WAC efforts, and outline why and how assessment is an appropriate mechanism for doing so.
The table of contents for this special issue includes:
Introduction
Ruth Kistler, Kathleen Blake Yancey, and Kara Taczak, with Natalie Szysmanski
 
The Writer's Personal Profile: Student Self Assessment and Goal Setting at the Start of the Term
Tracy Ann Robertson & Vicki Tolar Burton
 
Voices at the Table: Balancing the Needs and Wants of Program Stakeholders to Design a Value-added Writing Assessment Plan
Terry Myers Zawacki, E. Shelley Reid, Ying Zhou, & Sarah E. Baker
 
Pairing WAC and Quantitative Reasoning through Portfolio Assessment and Faculty Development
Carol Rutz & Nathan D. Grawe
 
Profiling Programs: Formative Uses of Departmental Consultations in the Assessment of Communication Across the Curriculum
Chris M. Anson & Deanna Dannels
 
Data Driven Change Is Easy; Assessing and Maintaining It Is the Hard Part
Les Perelman
 
Program Assessment: Processes, Propagation, and Culture Change
Monica Stitt-Bergh & Thomas Hilgers
 
Developing a Culture of Writing at Virginia State University: A New Writing Emphasis
Freddy L. Thomas
2010 WPA esearch Grant Proposals
CALL FOR 2010 WPA RESEARCH GRANT PROPOSALS

The Research Grants Committee of the Council of Writing Program
Administrators invites proposals for research projects that investigate
issues and practices in writing program administration. Maximum awards of
$2000 may be given; average awards are $1000. Applicants must be current WPA
members; all current WPA members are eligible to apply.

Deadline for Proposals: January 1, 2010

Please organize your proposal as follows:

1. A cover page that gives the names of all investigators (please don't
identify yourself or your institution in the rest of the proposal), the
proposal/project title, mailing addresses, email addresses and phone
numbers.

2. A project overview of no more than two pages single-spaced in which you:

. explain the problem or question your research project will attempt
to investigate or solve

. briefly outline the methodology you plan to use to approach the
problem

. describe how the project will address the problem or question you
have identified

. give a timetable detailing how the project will proceed

. connect the project to previously published research and
scholarship

. describe your expertise in this area

. describe how the results will be shared professionally (See
"Expectations of Reward Recipients" below)

3. A realistic, detailed budget on a separate page. For grants over $1000,
in-kind budget items or alternative budget sources need to be included in
the budget. State also if you will accept partial funding.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION

You may find the following criteria useful in preparing your proposal. The
WPA Grants Committee will use these criteria to conduct blind reviews of all
proposals.

1. Relevance: The project is relevant to the work of writing program
administrators, it applies to contexts outside of the immediate
institutional context of origin, and writing program administrators will
benefit from the outcomes of this project.

2. Contribution: The project not only is related to prior scholarship and
research but also makes an original contribution.

3. Proposer's Past Scholarship/Expertise: Through prior research and
expertise, the proposer is well-prepared to undertake this project.

4. Methods: The methodology is clear, workable, and appropriate to this
project.

5. Feasibility: The proposer can reasonably complete the project in the
proposed time frame.

6. Cost Effectiveness: The budget expenditures are reasonable and the
project's outcomes justify the project's expenses.

Restrictions:

. Ordinarily, you will not receive funding for released time for the
grantee or others; for purely local initiatives or projects with little
relevance to other settings; for outside consultants or evaluators; for the
production of non-researched materials; for dissertation research; travel to
present your research at WPA or any other conference. (Funding for travel
to conferences for research purposes may be considered) or for supplements
to existing grants, unless it is clear that the WPA grant provides an
opportunity to extend the project in new directions.

. WPA does not generally fund institutional overhead. If grants are
approved that require institutional overhead, WPA will allow no more than
10% of funding to institutional overhead.

. You may not submit more than one proposal per year. The Committee
will give first consideration for awards to those who have not received an
award for three years.

. Former WPA Board members should wait a year after their term has
expired to apply for a grant.

EXPECTATIONS OF REWARD RECIPIENTS

1. Grantees are expected to submit articles resulting from the research to
WPA Journal for first consideration.

2. Grantees are expected to produce a brochure presenting research results
at the annual CCCC's WPA breakfast in the year during which the award is
granted. Applicants should budget approximately $200 for production of the
brochure in their application.

3. Grantees are expected to submit a final written report of their research
outcomes to the Chair of the Research Grants Committee by June 15 of the
year after they receive the award. Ordinarily, reports will be 5-7 pages in
length. In some circumstances, grantees may need more space, in which case a
report of up to 10 pages is acceptable. These reports should outline
specific plans for submitting an article reporting the results to the WPA
Journal as well as other plans for dissemination.

Questions about proposals can be directed to

Barbara L'Eplattenier bleplatt AT ualr.edu

The preferred method for proposal submission is a Microsoft Word attachment
to an e-mail sent to Barbara L'Eplattenier bleplatt AT ualr.edu

If applicants need to send paper copies, please send four copies of the
proposal to the address below. E-mails and paper copies must be received no
later than January 1, 2010.

Barbara L'Eplattenier
Department of Rhetoric and Writing
2801 S. University Ave
Little Rock AR 72204-1099

Winners will be announced at the 2010 WPA breakfast at the Conference on
College Composition and Communication.
Call for Proposals: Across the Disciplines
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

 

Call for Proposals
A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Fall 2010
 
Writing across the Curriculum at the Community College:  Beating the Odds
 
Guest editor:  Clint Gardner, Salt Lake Community College
 
Writing across the curriculum and writing in the disciplines (WAC/WID) programs in community colleges have been the focus of only sporadic scholarship over the years.  While there are a smattering of articles, a handful of doctoral dissertations, and a few books devoted to the subject (mostly from the late 80’s and mid-90’s), substantial research on WAC/WID from a community college perspective seems seriously lacking in comparison to the research that has been conducted in other postsecondary settings.  Given the pervasive teaching mission that all community colleges share, the collaborative drive that many experienced faculty from across the disciplines display, and the community college’s specific commitment to general education, it seems certain that a great deal of WAC/WID work is taking place in community colleges, even if that work is not specifically referred to on campus as “WAC” or “WID.”  In this issue of Across the Disciplines, therefore, we will focus the spotlight on community college WAC/WID initiatives and seize the opportunity to expand the range of scholarly work in this area, exploring the challenges that community college WAC programs face, the ways in which student demographics and goals shape their experience of writing in the disciplines, and what the future of WAC/WID might be at the community college level.
 
We invite proposals for articles that explore questions such as the following, as well as others related to the topic of Writing across the Curriculum/Writing in the Disciplines at the Community College:
 
·         What are the parameters of community college WAC/WID initiatives?  How do they work?  What are their successes?  Their failures? 
·         How does WAC/WID relate to general education in community college curricula?  How does general education use writing as a key pedagogy?  How are faculty from across the disciplines prepared to teach writing intensive courses?
·         What special challenges do community college WAC/WID programs face?
·         What are the effects of working conditions and teaching loads on WAC/WID initiatives?
·         What is the history of WAC/WID initiatives at community colleges?
·         How are effective WAC/WID programs administered at community colleges?
·         What role do community college writing centers play in WAC/WID?
·         How do community college WAC/WID programs integrate with distance learning initiatives?
·         How do structural/administrative issues shape the outcomes of WAC/WID at the community college?
·         What are the outcomes of WAC/WID for the community college student?
·         How do community college WAC/WID programs align themselves with their institution’s educational mission?
·         How are community college WAC/WID programs assessed, and how are these assessments tied to budgetary, political, or accreditation needs?
·         How do the community college student’s educational experience and educational goals affect the structure and/or outcomes of WAC/WID?
We're eager to read innovative work that critically explores the foundations, implications, and influence of writing technologies and WAC/WID initiatives—work that is theoretically informed, that offers original research data, and that builds on appropriate literature reviews. Descriptions of specific WAC/WID initiatives are welcome but they should be situated within an analysis of a larger issue(s).
 
We welcome inquiries about ideas for proposals.
 
Deadline for Proposals: September 1, 2009
Notification of Acceptance: by November 2009
Manuscripts Due: March 1, 2010
Publication: Fall 2010
Proposal Format: Please submit a one-page proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article. Proposals and manuscripts should follow APA documentation style, which is the standard for Across the Disciplines. Send your proposal electronically (in MS Word format) to Clint Gardner (Clint.Gardner@slcc.edu), guest editor, and Michael Pemberton (michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu), the editor of ATD. Please be sure to include your full contact information.
 
7th Annual IWCA Summer Institute for Writing

**7th annual IWCA Summer Institute for Writing Center Directors and Professionals**

Sunday, July 12 - Friday, July 18, 2009
Temple University

Philadelphia, PA

(virtual tours of Temple and Philly)<http://www.temple.edu/undergrad/admissions_flash/>

Join co-chairs Lori Salem (Temple University) and Brad Hughes (University of
Wisconsin-Madison), plus seven outstanding leaders (to be announced soon), plus
a great group of Temple writing-center professionals and students, plus 55
wonderful participants from around the US and the world for in-depth and
critical discussions of these kinds of topics--

*       writing center philosophies, missions, theories, and literature
*       leadership in an academic culture
*       diversity and writing centers
*       tutor education
*       planning, growing, developing, and re-imagining a writing center
*       assessment
*       research and publishing
*       collaborating across our campuses and beyond
*       writing fellows
*       writing center politics and administration (or developing your inner
Pollyanna and Machiavelli!)
*       technology and writing centers
*       working with multilingual writers
*       facilities and space
*       WAC, WID, and writing centers
*       communicating with faculty and administrators
*       writing center support for graduate-level writers
*       community writing centers
*       funding, budgeting, fundraising, endowments
*       research with tutor alumni
*       writing center workshops
*       and issues, questions, knowledge and experience that participants bring


Past institutes have been wonderfully enriched by international participants, as
well as by participants from two-year colleges and secondary schools.

Philadelphia is a terrific place to visit in the summer, and not just because of
the Phillies and the cheesesteaks.  We'll be meeting on Temple's campus, a leafy
oasis in the north part of the city, and in Center City, within easy walking
distance of brew pubs, restaurants, bookstores, funky boutiques, and coffee
shops.  Philadelphia's historical sites (the Liberty Bell, Christ Church) are
well worth the trip, as are the city's arts institutions, especially the newly
expanded Art Museum (complete with Rocky Stairs), the Institute of Contemporary
Art, the Mutter Museum (google it!).  Philly is a terrific and welcoming place
for families if you're considering bringing yours, with a major zoo, aquarium,
science museum, history museum, as well as not one but two rivers and the
largest urban park in the country.

Anticipated registration fee: $800 (includes an opening dinner and four
lunches.)

Two sites are available for lodging:  On-campus private dorm rooms at $38/night;
or downtown hotel at approximately $145/night. (On-campus lodging for families
is also available at a slightly higher rate.)

Six scholarships will be available to defray the registration fee.  Stayed tuned
for more details about how to apply.


Registration opens Friday, February 27, 2009.  Participation will be limited to
the first 55 registrants.



Please Note: The institute often fills to capacity two to four months in
advance, so if participating in the 2009 institute is a priority for you, be
sure to register early.  Registration for the 2009 Summer Institute will open on
February 27th.


We'll have more details about leaders, lodging, registration, scholarships, and
transportation options in coming weeks.


Questions about the summer 09 institute?  Please contact us at:


Lori Salem at lori.salem@temple.edu<mailto:lori.salem@temple.edu or
215-204-0709.  Lori is this year's co-chair and local host.  She is the Director
of Temple University Writing Center and Assistant Vice Provost for Undergraduate
Studies

or

Brad Hughes at bthughes@wisc.edu<mailto:bthughes@wisc.edu or 608-263-3823. 
Brad is this year's co-chair.  He is the Director of the Writing Center and the
Director of Writing Across the Curriculum at the University of
Wisconsin-Madison.

Thanks for your interest!

--Lori and Brad
 

Announcing publication of Across the Disciplines special issue on Writing Technologies and WAC
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/technologies/index.cfm

Across the Disciplines is pleased to announce the publication of a special issue on “Writing Technologies and Writing Across the Curriculum: Current Lessons and Future Trends” ( http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/technologies/index.cfm), guest edited by Karen Lunsford.  This special issue of ATD explores how and why WAC/WID initiatives incorporate writing technologies, take advantage of emergent forms of writing instruction, and adapt to evolving disciplinary and cultural norms for writing.
 
The table of contents for this special issue includes:
 
Introduction: Writing Technologies and WAC
        Karen J. Lunsford
 
Seduction or Productivity: Repurposing the Promise of Technology
        William Klein & Suellynn Duffey
 
Programs that Work(ed): Revisiting the University of Michigan, the University of Chicago, and George Mason University Programs after 20 Years
        Morgan T. Reitmeyer
 
Online Tutoring: A Symbiotic Relationship with Writing Across the Curriculum Initiatives
        Judy Arzt, Kristine E. Barnett, & Jessyka Scoppetta
 
Developing and Assessing an Online Research Writing Course
         Christopher W. Dean
 
Students' Strengths and Weaknesses in Evaluating Technical Arguments as Revealed through Implementing Calibrated Peer Review in a Bioengineering Laboratory
        Tracy Volz & Ann Saterbak
 
Writing in the Disciplines versus Corporate Workplaces: On the Importance of Conflicting Disciplinary Discourses in the Open Source Movement and the Value of Intellectual Property
        Brian D. Ballentine
 
Writing in the Disciplines, Technology, and Disciplinary Grounding
        Carolyn Sterling-Deer
 
Intersectional Computer-Supported Collaboration in Business Writing: Learning through Challenged Performance
        Dirk Remley
 
Not Just Words Any More: Multimodal Communication Across the Curriculum
        Lillian Bridwell-Bowles, Karen E. Powell, & Tiffany Walter
 

Dr. Michael Pemberton            
Professor, Department of Writing and Linguistics
Editor, Across the Disciplines
Georgia Southern University              
 

Call for Proposals to Host Future IWCA Conferences
For more information: http://writingcenters.org/2008/12/call-for-proposals-to-host-futu ...

Call for Proposals to Host International Writing Centers Association Conference

Recruiting hosts for these conferences:

Spring 2010
Fall 2011
Spring 2013

Proposals are due to the chair of Conferences & Institutes Committee Roberta Kjesrud by February 2, 2009
(Roberta.Kjesrud@wwu.edu)

We urge you to review dates of conflicting conferences, and to consider the costs and ease of attending; with travel budgets in jeopardy, we will be interested to see proposals that include options for our members (especially international members) in attending or accessing the conference electronically. A non-U.S. venue is also attractive to the committee.

Download the complete CFP at http://writingcenters.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/host_iwca_cfp.pdf

Position Announcement
For more information: http://www.careers.ualberta.ca/Academic/CompetitionDetails.aspx?k ...

 

Director, Centre for Writers
Department of English and Film Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Competition No.  -   
A10017185
Closing Date  -   
Will remain open until filled.

The Department of English and Film Studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Alberta invites applications for a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor in Writing Studies, to commence July 1, 2009.
 
The successful applicant will be a collegial, team-oriented scholar prepared to direct the Centre for Writers and teach courses in the field of Writing Studies. Responsibilities will include teaching at all levels of the curriculum including courses to train undergraduate and graduate tutors for the Centre for Writers. Appropriate course reduction to support the administration and further development of the Centre will be provided. The Director of the Centre for Writers will participate fully in the wider activities of the Faculty of Arts and especially in the University's broad Writing Initiatives, working collaboratively with others such as the Director of Writing Across the Curriculum and the Director of Writing Initiatives.
   
Qualified candidates must hold a PhD degree in an appropriate field or have successfully defended their thesis by July 1, 2009. Applicants will demonstrate a solid theoretical foundation and outstanding potential for a research career. Applicants must also have a record of research, publication, and teaching. A demonstrated commitment to and experience with writing centre research and/or administration will be an asset. 
 
This appointment will be made at or close to entry level and at a salary  that is commensurate with qualifications and experience. Candidates should send a letter of application, a complete curriculum vitae (with full contact information, including phone numbers and e-mail address), a writing sample (20-page maximum), the names and contact information of at least three referees, and a teaching dossier, including evaluations of teaching performance. Candidates are responsible for ensuring that relevant official transcripts and letters of reference from the three named referees are sent directly to the Department. Review of applications will begin 28 February 2009; however the competition will remain open until filled. All application materials should be sent directly to: 
 
Garrett PJ Epp, Chair
Department of English and Film Studies
3-5 Humanities Centre, University of Alberta
Edmonton, AB T6G 2E5
Canada 
 
For further information about the position or the Department, please contact the Chair by email at garrett.epp@ualberta.ca. For information about the Centre for Writers or the work of the recent university-wide Writing Task Force, see http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/arts/wtf.cfm
 
With more than 37,000 students and 14,000 staff, the University of Alberta (www.ualberta.ca) grants almost 7,500 degrees annually to graduates of 200 undergraduate and 170 graduate programs. A research-intensive, medical-doctoral, multi-campus institution, the University of Alberta offers a full range of academic and professional programs and has designated 26 areas of established and emerging research excellence. The Faculty of Arts (www.arts.ualberta.ca) is its largest Faculty with over 350 faculty members in 15 departments in Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences in addition to the Women's Studies Program and the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies. The Faculty of Arts has approximately 6000 undergraduate and 900 graduate students. The Faculty provides a variety of opportunities for research funding, including the newly established $1.5 million Killam Research Fund which supports research, scholarship, and creative activities in the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. Within the Faculty, the Humanities has particular strengths in humanities computing and in creative writing. The Faculty has also recently helped establish interdisciplinary units such as the Centre for Writers, the China Institute, the Canadian Literature Centre, the Institute for United States Policy Studies, and the Prince Takamado Japan Centre for Teaching and Research. The Department of English and Film Studies itself (www.arts.ualberta.ca/efs/) is a large, vibrant, and collegial unit with a superlative record for teaching, research, and service.   
 
Greater Edmonton (www.edmonton.ca), with nearly one million residents in the city and surrounding communities, offers a beautiful, park-like setting on a spectacular river valley. The city is the capital of Alberta, with the lowest provincial tax regime in the country, and has led the nation in economic growth in the past five years. Edmonton is known as Canada's Festival City, with more than thirty major annual festivals celebrating its rich cultural diversity and community spirit. It has all the attractions of a big city, yet it is clean, safe, and livable, with excellent schools and health care.
 
http://www.careers.ualberta.ca/Academic/CompetitionDetails.aspx?key=4266
Parlor Press WPA Series
For more information: http://www.parlorpress.com/wpa.html
Dear Colleagues, 
 
It is with great pleasure that Margot Soven and I announce a new series with Parlor Press on Writing Program Administration. The series provides a venue for scholarly monographs and projects that are research or theory-based and that provide insights into important issues in the field. We encourage submissions that examine the work of writing program administration, broadly defined (e.g., not just administration of first-year composition programs). Possible topics include but are not limited to: 
 
  ? Historical studies of writing program administration or administrators (archival work is particularly encouraged); 
  ? Studies evaluating the relevance of theories developed in other fields (e.g., management, sustainability, organizational theory); 
  ? Studies of particular personnel issues (e.g., unionization, use of adjunct faculty); 
  ? Research on developing and articulating curricula 
  ? Studies of assessment and accountability issues for WPAs; 
  ? Examinations of the politics of writing program administration WPA work at the community college. 
 
Please see the website for information about how to propose a book for this series: http://www.parlorpress.com/wpa.html 
 
 
Susan H. McLeod, Research Professor 
University of California, Santa Barbara 
http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/faculty/mcleod.htm 
 

Composing a Community: A History of Writing Across the Curriculum
For more information: http://parlorpress.com/sales.html

Composing a Community
A History of Writing Across the Curriculum

 

Writing across the curriculum is experiencing a renaissance in institutions across the country. People starting or restarting WAC programs will want to read Composing a Community: A History of Writing Across the Curriculum.

Composing a Community is not only a history of early WAC programs but also of how the people developing those programs were in touch with one another, exchanging ideas and information, forming first a network and then a community. Composing a Community captures the stories of pioneers like Elaine Maimon, Toby Fulwiler, and others, giving readers first-hand accounts from those who were present at the creation of this new movement. David Russell’s introduction sets this emergent narrative into relief.

Susan H. McLeod and Margot Iris Soven, themselves pioneers in WAC history, have assembled some of its most eloquent voices in this collection: Charles Bazerman, John C. Bean, Toby Fulwiler, Anne Herrington, Carol Holder, Peshe C. Kuriloff, Linda Peterson, David R. Russell, Christopher Thaiss, Barbara E. Walvoord, and Sam Watson. Their style is personal, lively, and informal as the authors succeed in putting their personal memories in the larger context of WAC studies.

Older News

Job Opening: WAC Suvey Manager


Writing Across the Curriculum Survey Manager

 

JOB DESCRIPTION

 

Since 2004, the Writing Across the Curriculum program at Quinnipiac University has trained over 350 faculty in over 40 majors to use writing to learn techniques to advance the learning objectives in their classrooms.  The WAC program has just been awarded additional funds from the Davis Educational Foundation to initiate a three-year project to initiate a writing in the disciplines (WID) program.  The first phase of this project (2009-2010) will involve gathering data from departments across the campus to:  1) document learning goals and the extent to which writing is currently (or is not) occurring in majors; and 2) to learn more about the writing strategies that Quinnipiac faculty trained under a previous grant are finding most useful in their disciplinary work with students.  The survey, and possible follow-up in focus groups, will be used as the means through which we begin to collect faculty assignment samples and student work samples and to compile a “WAC database” that will be retained for program development, research and pedagogy.

            We seek to hire a one-year Survey Manager, with possible renewal, to coordinate the first phase of this project.  The Survey Manager will be responsible for developing and carrying out a survey research project to assess faculty attitudes toward writing and learning.  In addition, s/he will conduct focus groups and/or qualitative interviews with selected faculty to validate and elaborate on the survey findings.  The Manager will develop appropriate data collection methodologies and protocols, oversee the implementation of the survey, and will be responsible for distributing the survey findings across the University community.

 

We will begin reviewing materials from qualified candidates on August 7th, 2009, with an aim to recommend a final hire by the end of August at the latest. Send application materials (cv/resume, three letters of reference and a 1-2 page narrative that describes work experience/training that would be relevant to the position as described) to Robert Smart, English Department Chair, Quinnipiac University, 275 Mount Carmel Avenue, Hamden, CT  06518, Robert.smart@quinnipiac.edu. Salary and benefits are competitive.

1.      Develops survey questions, in consultation with WAC Committee

2.      Pilot tests survey questions and reformats, based on feedback

3.      Implements a campus-wide survey, including follow-up with non-respondents

4.      Assists in monitoring quality assurance by re-contacting respondents to validate data collected

5.      Codes written survey results and enters data into appropriate format for data analysis. Conducts data analysis in collaboration with WAC Committee. Extracts data from surveys and transcribes information into appropriate format. Performs support services involving word processing, spreadsheet, database programs.

6.      Presentation of survey and interview results to faculty groups on campus to assess validity of findings

7.      Qualitative follow-up with faculty in interviews and/or focus groups to validate findings

8.      Integrate findings, writing samples and other materials provided by faculty to start a WAC database that will be used for further research and program development

QUALIFICATIONS

The ideal candidate will demonstrate previous success with managing research projects and interacting with clients in the nonprofit or government sectors, or will have experience conducting similar research in a post secondary context.  Experience with writing (WAC) research in a University setting is a plus.  An advanced degree in survey methodology, marketing research, composition/writing or in the social sciences or related field required.  Knowledge of WAC programming a plus.

 

.              Strong analytical, organizational, communications and interpersonal skills.

.              Excellent writing skills including writing and editing of instruments, protocols, reports and presentations targeting wide ranges of audiences. Ability to write and edit easy-to-use survey instruments and clear, succinct, well structured written reports.

.              Strong understanding of the research process including survey design, qualitative and quantitative methods, writing and editing, and strong attention to detail and coordination skills.

.              Moderation/ interviewing skills.

.              Strong skills in Microsoft office including Word, Excel and PowerPoint. SPSS and experience working with survey software required.

.              Excellent interpersonal skills, team leadership and communications skills.

ATD CFP: WAC and Assessment
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

Call for Proposals for ATD, a special issue focused on Writing across the Curriculum and Assessment: Activities,
Programs, and Insights at the Intersection

Guest editors: The Florida State University Editorial Collective
(Kathleen Blake Yancey; Emily Baker; Scott Gage; Ruth Kistler; Natalie Syzmanski; Kara Taczak; and Jill Taylor)

In 1997, Brian Huot and Kathleen Blake Yancey published their co-edited volume Assessing Writing across the Curriculum: Diverse Approaches and Practices. In this volume, contributors explored various ways of assessing WAC programs, moving theoretically, ethnographically, administratively, and rhetorically to document the efficacy of such programs. During the last decade, we’ve seen this work expand, in the process frequently leading to new WAC-related innovations. Several programs, for example. have moved from WAC to CAC--from Writing across the Curriculum to Communication across the Curriculum—so as to incorporate multiple kinds of communication into a writing-rich but not writing-exclusive curriculum. Other WAC programs, like George Mason University’s and North Carolina State University’s, have used assessment activities as one component in a larger WAC research study. And still others, like researchers at the University of Hawaii, have focused on the student experience, drawing from collective interviews new lessons for WAC administrators and program designers. In sum, the last decade has produced new ways of thinking about WAC as well as new ways of thinking about how to assess WAC. This special issue of ATD will explore how assessment can help us understand, support, and enrich all such WAC efforts, and outline why and how assessment is an appropriate mechanism for doing so. 

We invite proposals for articles that explore questions such as the following, as well as others related to the topic of Writing
across the Curriculum/Writing in the Disciplines and Assessment.

• Over the last decade, we’ve seen more emphasis on assessment at both federal and state levels. How has this emphasis on assessment influenced WAC, or has it?  What are the consequences for programs today if this emphasis continues? 

• How do the strategies used for assessing WAC programs differ when CAC programs are assessed? Are there lessons in CAC assessment for WAC programs?

• WAC programs often operate at the nexus of other programs and centers, for instance first-year composition programs and writing centers. Are there models of assessment that articulate the relationship among these other programs and centers, allowing us to engage in a more capacious assessment?

• What is the relationship between individual assessment and program assessment in WAC programs? Are the two forms of
assessment at odds with each other, or how can they be productively combined?

• One intent of program assessment, possibly the most important one, is to understand how well a program “works” such that it will work better. Do we have good examples of how programs have been enhanced based on program assessments?  What are their features?

• Given some of the new dimensions of WAC/WID programs, including the incorporation of digital technologies, what new strategies for assessment will be required? What is the appropriate role, if any, of computerized assessments of WAC/WID writing (e.g., ETS's e-rater) for individual assessment and/or for program assessment?

• What is the relationship between research and assessment? How is each defined? Are there differences between the two we should be aware of? Alternatively, how do these two efforts work together?

We're eager to read innovative work that critically explores the foundations, implications, and influence of writing technologies
and WAC/WID initiatives – work that is theoretically informed, that offers original research data, and that builds on appropriate
literature reviews. Descriptions of specific WAC/WID initiatives are welcome and should be situated within an analysis of a larger issue(s).

We welcome inquiries about ideas for proposals.

Deadline for Proposals: September 1, 2008

Notification of Acceptance: by November 2008

Manuscripts Due: March 1, 2009

Publication: Fall 2009

Proposal Format: Please submit a one-page proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article. Proposals and manuscripts should follow APA documentation style, which is the standard for Across the Disciplines. Send your proposal electronically (in MS Word format) to Kathleen Blake Yancey
(kyancey@fsu.edu), FSU editorial collective coordiinator, and Michael Pemberton (michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu), the editor of
ATD. Please be sure to include your full contact information.
 

Special issue of Across the Disciplines on Writing Fellows
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

 

Across the Disciplines is pleased to announce the publication of a special issue on "Rewriting Across the Curriculum: Writing Fellows as Agents of Change in WAC," edited by Brad Hughes and Emily B. Hall.  To quote from the editors' introduction, "Well-designed Writing Fellows programs – curriculum-based peer tutoring programs, in which undergraduate peer mentors are assigned to work collaboratively with students and faculty in specific writing-intensive courses across the curriculum – can become integral parts of WAC programs in ways that benefit student-writers, faculty, and fellows themselves. Because they embed collaborative learning and contemporary composition pedagogy within courses across the curriculum, Writing Fellows programs also, however, pose various theoretical, pedagogical, and administrative challenges, and they reveal complex intersections of writing, peer collaboration, disciplinary knowledge, and institutional and curricular politics.  In this special issue, our contributing authors explore new ways to understand Writing Fellows programs and the connections between them and WAC."

The Table of Contents for this issue includes:
 

Conducting Research in the Gray Space: How Writing Associates Negotiate Between WAC and WID in an Introductory Biology Course
Jill Gladstein, Swarthmore College

Challenging Our Practices, Supporting Our Theories: Writing Mentors As Change Agents Across Discourse Communities
Joan Mullin and Susan Schorn, with Tim Turner, Rachel Hertz, Derek Davidson and Amanda Baca, University of Texas at Austin

Theories of Specialized Discourses and Writing Fellows Programs
Carol Severino and Mary Traschel, The University of Iowa

Writing Fellows as WAC Change Agents: Changing What? Changing Whom? Changing How?
Terry Myers Zawacki, George Mason University (with contributions from former writing fellows Alex Antram, Amaris Price, Katy Ray, and Theresa Koucheravy)

Using Peer Writing Fellows in British Universities: Complexities and Possibilities
Peter O'Neill, London Metropolitan University

The Protean Shape of the Writing Associate's Role: An Empirical Study and Conceptual Model
Rhoda Cairns, Briercrest College, and Paul V. Anderson, Miami University (Ohio)

Also, please visit the journal's home page and subscribe to our new RSS feed, compliments of ATD's new Assistant Editor and programming guru, Michael Cripps.  With the simple click of a button on your toolbar, you can now be kept immediately up-to-date about new articles as they are published.  (Just look at the bottom of the menu bar on the left hand side of the page.)
 

Georgia Institute of Technology: Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship
For more information: http://www.lcc.gatech.edu/communications/mlb/

Georgia Institute of Technology: Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship

 

The Georgia Institute of Technology’s School of Literature, Communication, and Culture (LCC) seeks highly qualified PhDs in literature, rhetoric, composition, technical communication, film studies, and related fields for the Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship. This program has a special focus in digital pedagogy and cultural studies of science and technology; we encourage candidates with strong interests in these areas to apply.

 

The fellowship carries a 3/3 teaching assignment of multimodal composition and technical communication courses informed by individual Fellows’ research interests, and the one-year contract is renewable for up to three years. Fellows receive the rank of Instructor with benefits and professional development opportunities:

·         Guidance for using technology in the classroom and designing courses

·         Seminars on electronic pedagogy and technical communication

·         Mentorship from LCC senior faculty

·         Colloquia for presenting and refining research with other faculty

·         Workshops and support for finding a tenure-track job

 

Review of applications will continue until positions are filled. To apply, please submit a letter of application, teaching statement, CV, and a file with three letters of recommendation:

Chair, Brittain Fellows Committee

School of Literature, Communication, and Culture

Georgia Institute of Technology

Atlanta, GA 30332-0165

 

For more information, visit:

www.lcc.gatech.edu/communications/mlb/

 

The Georgia Institute of Technology is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.  LCC is especially interested in considering applications from women and minority candidates.

 

 

2008 IWCA Summer Institute

Building on the tradition, excitement, and rich learning experiences of past IWCA Summer Institutes . . .


We're delighted to announce the **6th annual IWCA Summer Institute for Writing Center Directors and Professionals**--

Sunday, July 20 - Friday, July 25, 2008
University of Wisconsin-Madison ( virtual tour)
Madison, WI ( info about Madison) ( photo tour of Madison)

Join co-chairs Lisa Ede (Oregon State University), Paula Gillespie (Marquette University), and Brad Hughes (University of Wisconsin-Madison), plus six outstanding leaders (to be announced soon), plus a great group of Madison writing-center professionals and students, plus 50 wonderful participants from around the US and the world for in-depth and critical discussions of these kinds of topics--

  • writing center philosophies, missions, theories, and literature
  • leadership in an academic culture
  • diversity and writing centers
  • tutor education
  • planning, growing, developing, and re-imagining a writing center
  • assessment
  • research and publishing
  • collaborating across our campuses and beyond
  • writing fellows
  • writing center politics and administration (or developing your inner Pollyanna and Machiavelli!)
  • technology and writing centers
  • working with multilingual writers
  • facilities and space
  • WAC, WID, and writing centers
  • communicating with faculty and administrators
  • writing center support for graduate-level writers
  • community writing centers
  • funding, budgeting, fundraising, endowments
  • ice cream
  • research with tutor alumni
  • writing center workshops
  • and issues, questions, knowledge and experience that participants bring


Past institutes have been wonderfully enriched by international participants, as well as by participants from two-year colleges and secondary schools.

Madison is gorgeous and fun in the summer.  We'll be meeting in a great conference facility on campus (the Pyle Center), right on the shore of Lake Mendota, just a couple blocks from the UW-Madison Writing Center, near the main research library, and practically next door to the outdoor terrace at the student union, a lively summer gathering spot overlooking the lake.  And we'll be within easy walking distance of blocks and blocks of all kinds of restaurants, bookstores, funky boutiques, and coffee shops on State St.  Madison offers plenty to do for families if you're considering bringing yours--canoes to rent, bike paths to bike, trails to hike, shops to explore . . . a free zoo, free concerts, botanical gardens, a Thai pavilion, tennis courts, volleyball, an arboretum, a geology museum, a great farmers' market, art museums, campus-made ice cream . . . .


Anticipated registration fee: $600 (same as 2007; includes an opening dinner and lunches four days)

Conference-center lodging: $81/night (one block from the conference center; includes breakfast each morning)

*Participation will be limited to the first 50 registrants.*

Registration opens: **Friday, February 15, 2008**

n.b.--The institute often fills to capacity two to four months in advance, so if participating in the 2008 institute is a priority for you, be sure to register early.  Registration for the 2008 Summer Institute will open on February 15th.

****Have you participated in one of the past institutes?**** If so, would you be willing to post any experiences or advice you'd share with WCenter colleagues who are thinking about attending in 2008?

We'll have more details about leaders, lodging, registration, scholarships, and transportation options in coming months.  But we wanted to get this early word out to give those of you who are interested the chance to plan and to line up possible funding.


Questions about the summer 08 institute?  Please contact off list co-chair and local host Brad Hughes; Director, Writing Center; Director, Writing Across the Curriculum; University of Wisconsin-Madison ( bthughes@wisc.edu; 608-263-3823).
 

New England WAC Directors Meeting

"New England WAC Directors and Coordinators" meeting, Quinnipiac
University, Hamden, CT. We would like to invite all faculty and
administration who are responsible for WAC programs and initiatives in
the New England area, including New York and New Jersey to a regional
strategy and resource sharing meeting November 16th, 10-3:00 at
Quinnipiac University. Lunch will be provided for everyone. The object
of the meeting is to gauge interest in developing a loose regional
network of WAC programs and initiatives that could meet once or twice
every year to develop support strategies, plan development and resource
exchange strategies and provide some strategic planning to promote WAC
in the area. Please rsvp if interested to Robert Smart, WAC Director at
Quinnipiac University, Robert.Smart@Quinnipiac.edu, 203-582-3325.
Seating, unfortunately, is somewhat limited, so please rsvp promptly.
Thank you."

 

CFP: Writing Technologies and Writing Across the Curriculum: Current Lessons

Call for Proposals: A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Fall 2008

Writing Technologies and Writing Across the Curriculum: Current Lessons
and Future Trends

Guest editor: Karen J. Lunsford, Writing Program, University of
California at Santa Barbara

In their introduction to WAC for the New Millennium, Susan McLeod and
Eric Miraglia note both challenges and advantages to WAC programs that
may result as teaching with technology becomes widespread.  On one hand,
there is a concern that as instructors across campus begin to teach with
technology, they face economic and administrative pressures to adopt
pedagogies inimical to WAC goals.  Technology becomes a means to
"deliver instruction" more efficiently to ever larger classes, and thus
the "banking model of education" may become privileged.  On the other
hand, technologies and uses for technologies are myriad, and instructors
interested in WAC have always been adept at creating "cognitively rich"
activities, spaces, and media for and with their students.  Moreover,
the technologies and norms for producing, revising, responding to, and
distributing writing-whether to the general public or within the
disciplines-rapidly change, and instructors respond to those changes.

This special issue of ATD will explore how and why WAC/WID initiatives
incorporate writing technologies, negotiate (or not) the calls for
efficiency, and adapt to evolving disciplinary and cultural norms for
writing.

We invite proposals for articles that explore questions such as the
following, as well as others related to the topic of Writing
Technologies and WAC/WID.

ECAC (Electronic Communication Across the Curriculum) programs
have been established for some time.  Have the distinctions between ECAC and
WAC/WID collapsed in today's academy?  If not, what distinctions remain?
If so, what are the consequences for programs today and in the future?
And what lessons regarding efficiency and ingenuity have we learned from
ECAC?

Many campuses have adopted or are planning to adopt course
management systems (Moodle, Blackboard/WebCT, Sakai, TOPIC, etc.).  The CMSs offer various technologies for writing and writing instruction.  How does the
use of a CMS intersect (or not) with WAC/WID initiatives?

WAC/WID initiatives often involve Writing Centers and Online
Writing Labs (OWLs).  What does research have to say about the intersections among WAC/WID programs, Writing Centers and/or OWLs, and writing technologies?

Are new models developing?

How are WAC/WID programs addressing the increase in multimodal
forms of communication?

How are WAC/WID programs addressing changes in disciplinary and
cultural norms for writing (e.g., new publication or distribution formats,
attitudes toward intellectual property, the use of social networking
software, etc.)? 

Faculty across the curriculum often develop technologies for
writing and for teaching (and assessing) writing-with or without consulting writing
specialists.  For example, faculty have advanced technologies such as
calibrated peer review; plagiarism detection services; clickers;
websites and blogs with writing advice; citation managers; and so on.  How do
WAC/WID programs intersect with these faculty initiatives?  What
strategies do programs adopt when faculty initiatives are at odds with WAC/WID
goals?

Do writing technologies enable multi-institutional and/or
multi-national collaborations among WAC/WID programs?  What models, if any, are
evolving for such collaborations?

What does research about WAC/WID programs have to tell us about
questions of student and faculty access to technologies and/or about their use of
technologies?

How should we best train instructors across the curriculum to
use writing technologies?

What are the effects of computerized assessments of writing
(e.g., ETS's e-rater) on WAC/WID?

What technologies aside from computers should WAC/WID programs
consider?

What innovations on the horizon are likely to impact programs?  What
technologies should WAC/WID programs actively develop or take part in
developing over the next ten years?

As technologies become familiar, they often become invisible.
What writing technologies deserve to be revisited at this point?

We're eager to read innovative work that critically explores the
foundations, implications, and influence of writing technologies and
WAC/WID initiatives - work that is theoretically informed, that offers
original research data, and that builds on appropriate literature
reviews.

Although descriptions of specific WAC/WID initiatives are welcome, they
should be situated within an analysis of a larger issue(s).  We welcome
inquiries about ideas for proposals.

Deadline for proposals: August 1, 2007

Notification of Acceptance: October 2007

Manuscripts Due: February 1, 2008

Publication: Fall 2008

Proposal format: Please submit a one-page proposal explaining your
topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans
for the structure of your article.  Proposals and manuscripts should
follow APA documentation style, which is the standard for Across the
Disciplines.

Send your proposal electronically (in MS Word format) to the guest
editor (klunsford@writing.ucsb.edu) and Michael Pemberton
(michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu), the editor of ATD.  Please be sure to
include your full contact information.

2007 IUPUI Assesment Institute
For more information: http://planning.iupui.edu/conferences/national/nationalconf.html

The 2007 Assessment Institute
November 4-6, 2007
The Westin Indianapolis
Indianapolis, Indiana
Pre-Institute Workshops: November 4, 2007
Institute Dates: November 5-6, 2007

Call for Proposals

To propose a workshop or poster please complete the Call for Proposal form by March 15, 2007 attaching a 50-word abstract and a 1-2 page extended description in WORD format only and email to: Karen E. Black at kblack@iupui.edu.

NOTE:  Preference will be given in the selection process to those proposals that include information about assessment findings and their use to improve student learning or institutional processes or services.

About the Institute

SPECIAL TRACKS FOR - Track plenary sessions and workshops emphasizing assessment in:

  • Civic Engagement
  • ePortfolios
  • Faculty Development
  • First-Year Experience
  • Student Development and Diversity

CONTINUING OUR TRADITIONS - We will present sessions emphasizing in:

  • Accreditation
  • All Major Fields
  • Assessment Methods
  • Community Colleges
  • General Education

In-depth Learning with Opportunities with Scholars/Practitioners for all Faculty and Administrators:

Pre-Institute Workshops: Extended learning opportunites with experienced practitioners.

Best Practices Fair: Featuring assessment instruments, methods, and approaches from test developers and campus practitioners in higher education.

Concurrent Workshops: In-depth sessions with leaders of successful assessment initiatives including:

  • Thomas A. Angelo, Professor of Higher Education and Director, University Teaching Development Centre, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Trudy W. Banta, Professor of Higher Education and Senior Advisor to the Chancellor for Academic Planning and Evaluation, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
  • Peter T. Ewell, Vice President, National Center for Higher Education Managment Systems (NCHEMS)
  • George D. Kuh, Chancellor's Professor of Higher Education and Director, Center for Postsecondary Research, Indiana University
  • Jeffrey A. Seybert, Director, Research, Evaluation and Institutional Development, Johnson County (KS) Community College
Call for Proposals to Host the 2008 WAC Conference

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
To Host in 2008
The Ninth International Conference on Writing Across the Curriculum
 
We invite proposals to host the 2008 WAC Conference.  The deadline for submitting proposals is April 12, 2006.  They should be submitted electronically as attachments to Art Young apyoung@clemson.edu at Clemson University, co-director of the 2006 WAC Conference.  The Conference Advisory Board, (members are listed on the 2006 WAC Conference web site <http://www.clemson.edu/caah/Pearce/wac2006/cabmembers.htm>) will review the proposals and notify the selected institution(s) by May 1, 2006.  
 
Proposals may be brief, usually 2-4 pages, and they should include relevant information about conference organizers and staff, facilities, transportation, financial support, administration endorsement, and prior conference experience.
Meeting of the National Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs at CCCC
For more information: http://www.ncte.org/program/cccc

Meeting of the International Network of Writing-across-the Curriculum Programs

Session: FSIG.09 on March 24, 2006 from 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM



The International Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs, renamed in 2005, has met annual at CCCC since 1981 as the National Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs. At these meetings, we use 80% of our time to work in small issues-and-problems groups on any topics pertinent to WAC/WID program development of interest to participants.

Participants: Chris Thaiss (Chair), Vicki Tolar Burton (Consultant), Pamela Childers (Consultant), Susan McLeod (Consultant), David Russell (Consultant), Art Young (Consultant), Mary McMullen-Light (Consultant), Linda Shohet (Consultant), Margot Soven (Consultant), Martha Townsend (Consultant), Terry Myers Zawacki (Consultant)
WAC Blog
For more information: http://http://cac.ophony.org

                                        New WAC Blog


The Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute at
BaruchCollege, CUNY is proud to announce the launch of CAC.OPHONY (http://cac.ophony.org) -- a new weblog on communication and communication-intensive instruction across the curriculum, maintained and administered by the Institute's Fellows. All members of the Kairos community are invited to browse the weblog and to contribute comments. Those interested in contributing guest posts should send an email to cacophony@baruch.cuny.edu>cacophony@baruch.cuny.edu

National Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs Website
For more information: http://www.nvwp.org/wac/

The National Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs introduces a new online directory and website. Since 1981, the Network operated with a print directory that was updated annually based on new information from members that we received through the post or at the annual meetings of the Network.  The new format will allow members to update their own entries at any time; moreover, it will allow members to browse the database according to their preferred search fields. This change makes the database more usable as well as more up to date for a range of member purposes.

Visit the directory at http://www.nvwp.org/wac/.

2005 Writing Centers Breakfast at CCCC

Please join us for breakfast this Friday!  Let us know that you're coming and we'll save a place for you. Email Wendy Goldberg at wendyfay@stanford.edu to reserve a spot. You can pay on arrival. Come talk the talk with your writing center colleagues.

You are invited!

2005 Writing Centers Breakfast at CCCC in San Francisco
Friday March 18, 7:00-8:30 a.m.
Jillians @ Metreon, 101 Fourth Street, Suite 170
Across the street from Moscone West on Howard and Fourth Street
EngiComm SIG at the 2005 CCCC

EngiComm: Special Interest Group on Writing Across the Engineering Curriculum TSIG.18 on Thursday, March 17, 2005 from 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM (check the program for meeting place)

We invite you to attend the meeting of the EngiComm SIG at the 2005 CCCC. This SIG brings together faculty interested in teaching technical/engineering communication to engineering students. This year, we will discuss how engineering communication programs, courses, and teaching relate to other frameworks, such as WAC/WID programs and theoretical issues (genre theory, discourse theory, etc.). Please plan to join us and bring a friend who is interested in engineering communication.

Julia Williams, Chair, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Steve Bucher, University of Southern California
Rob Irish, University of Toronto
Jon Leydens, Colorado School of Mines
Steven Youra, California Institute of Technolog

Call for Proposals: The Clearinghouse

Call for Proposals

            The Clearing House will be publishing a special edition on secondary school writing centers in its September/October 2006 issue. Research on writing centers in secondary schools has been limited despite the existence of centers in public and independent schools since the 1970s. Today, the number of writing centers in schools continues to grow. These centers have a variety of purposes and function in unique ways with common issues of funding, staffing, and roles within the institution. Secondary school writing centers also serve a variety of clients­individual students (for example, Advanced Placement, honors, ESL, developmental, college preparatory), faculty (new and experienced across disciplines), administrators, staff, and community (school and regional). This special edition will consider these and other related issues to help our audience gain a perspective on the significant role a writing center can play in the thinking, writing, and learning of a secondary school community and beyond.
            We encourage middle, secondary school, and college writing center directors and tutors, as well as teachers of all subjects, to submit proposals of approximately 250 words to Pamela B. Childers, The McCallie School,  (
pchilder@mccallie.org) by May 1, 2005. Final submissions (2,500 – 3,000 words) will be due by February 1, 2006.
        The Clearing House offers informative, practical articles on teaching and administration in middle schools and junior and senior high schools. All submissions are blind reviewed by peers in the field.

2005 WPA Breakfast at CCCC in San Francisco
For more information: http://www.wpacouncil.org

 You are invited!

2005 WPA Breakfast at CCCC in San Francisco

Thursday March 17, 7:00-8:30 a.m.

The Carnelian Room, 52nd floor of the Bank of America Building
555 California Street (corner of California and 3rd Street/Kearney)

Reserve your spot now. The registration form is available at  www.wpacouncil.org in PDF format. Remember to include a check when you mail it to Clyde Moneyhun (instructions are at the bottom of the form).

Across the Disciplines Announces Volume 2
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

Across the Disciplines: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Language, Learning, and Academic Writing has published its second volume. Articles and columns include a new column on secondary education and writing centers/WAC by Pamela Childers and articles by Jonathan Hall, Robert Samuels, Jessica Yood, Linda Anstendig, Eugene Richie, Shannon Young, Pauline Mosley and Bette Kirschstein. New articles and materials will be added to the volume as the year progresses.

Janice Lauer's Invention in Rhetoric and Composition Published Online
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/books/lauer_invention/

Janice M. Lauer's book, Invention in Rhetoric and Composition, is now available in digital form for free download in the WAC Clearinghouse. Published jointly with Parlor Press, which offers the book in print-on-demand and other digital formats, Lauer's book is the first in the series, Reference Guides to Rhetoric and Composition, which is edited by Charles Bazerman.

New in the Teaching Exchange: Joseph Williams' monograph, Problems into PROBLEMS: The Rhetoric of Introductions
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/exchange/williams.pdf

Joseph Williams offers a thoughtful treatment of problems, particularly in introductions. He opens his monograph with the following:

For well more than a decade now, researchers have been reporting how in the act of drafting we recognize and solve rhetorical problems -- how we evaluate and synthesize sources, set local rhetorical goals, then seek to achieve them. But if the literature on solving such problems is thick, our understanding of how we articulate the substantive problem that occasions our efforts to solve them is quite thin. By "substantive problem" I do not mean the local and ongoing struggle toward the discovery and articulation of meaning, but the significant question whose answer justifies the effort, the problem in the world or mind whose solution repays our time spent writing and our readers' spent reading. We criticize the writing of our students and colleagues on many grounds, but none is more common -- or devastating -- than the observation that they have failed not just to solve a problem, but even to pose one that we think "interesting." And as teachers, we experience no failure more common than our inability to explain what we mean by "pose" or "interesting" or "problem" and what it is about a text that elicits such criticism.

Williams' monograph offers much to writers and teachers of writing.

2005 CCCC Meeting of the National Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs
For more information: http://www.ncte.org/programs/cccc

CCCC Session: FSIG.14 on Mar 18, 2005 from 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM

The National Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs has met annually at CCCC since 1981. (The
San Francisco meeting will mark our 25th anniversary.) At these meetings, we use 80% of our time to work in small issues-and-problems groups on any topics pertinent to WAC program development of interest to participants. Members of the Network Consultants Board, who are invited to each meeting, facilitate the groups.
2005 CCCC Workshop: Starting/Restarting/Continuing WAC/WID: Program Models,Strategies, and Innovations
For more information: http://www.ncte.org/program/cccc/

Starting/Restarting/Continuing WAC/WID: Program Models,Strategies, and Innovations

CCCC Session W.4, March 16, 2005, 9:00-5:00

15-minute presentations (S=Speaker)

S1: Starting/Restarting WAC: Finding Your Allies
S2: The Roles of Writing in WAC
S3: ECAC: Technologies for Writing/Speaking
S4: Models of WAC/WID Program Assessment
S5: Building WAC/WID Oversight Committees

II. Small-group working sessions (W)—45 min.

W1: Starting/Restarting WAC
W2 ECAC: Technologies for Writing/Speaking
W3: WAC/WID Assessment
W4: WAC and Writing Centers
W5: Building a WI Requirement
W6: Writing and Speaking across the Curriculum

III. Small-group working sessions (W)—40 min.

W1. Starting/Restarting WAC
W2: Creative Writing across the Curriculum
W3: Writing Fellows and Linked Courses
W4: WAC and Writing Centers
W5: Roles of Writing in Courses
W6: WID Program Options

PM

IV. 15-minute presentations

S6: WID at the Univ. of Delaware
S7: Writing Fellows and Linked Courses
S8: CAC: Writing and Speaking across the Curriculum
S9: WAC Lite, Distance-Learning, and Guides in the Disciplines

V. Small-group workshop sessions (W)—40 min.

W1: Starting/Restarting WAC
W2: WAC Links between Colleges and Secondary Schools
W3: Setting up WAC/WID Oversight Boards
W4: ECAC: Technologies for Writing/Speaking
W5: The WAC Archive Project at U. of New Hampshire
W6: Online Writing Guides in the Disciplines

VI. Small-group workshop sessions (W)—45 min.

W1: Research Projects in WAC/WID
W2: WID Options
W3: Starting/Restarting WAC
W4. Roles of Writing in Courses
W5: WAC Links between Colleges and Secondary Schools
W6: WAC/WID Links to Other Institutional Initiatives

Participants: Chris Thaiss (Chair), Chris Thaiss (Chair), Joan Mullin (Discussion Leaders), Art Young (Discussion Leaders), Pamela B. Childers (Discussion Leaders), Cinthia Gannett (Discussion Leaders), Katherine E. Tirabassi (Discussion Leaders), Susan H. McLeod (Speaker 1), Donna Reiss (Speaker 3), Terry Myers Zawacki (Speaker Additional), Martha Townsend (Speaker Additional), Stephen Bernhardt (Speaker Additional), Margot Soven (Speaker Additional), Chris M. Anson (Speaker Additional), Vicki Tolar Burton (Speaker Additional)

Computers in Writing-Intensive Classrooms (CIWIC)

To all interested in higher education and K-12 writing instruction,
composition, communication, new media, and pedagogies incorporating
technology, I would like to announce a suite of summer institutes:

COMPUTERS IN WRITING-INTENSIVE CLASSROOMS (CIWIC)
June 1-14, 2005
Michigan Technological University
Houghton, Michigan

These institutes are led by
Dr. Cynthia Selfe, Michigan Technological University
Dr. Anne Wysocki, Michigan Technological University, and with visits by
Dr. Richard Selfe, Michigan Technological University
Dr. Gail Hawisher, University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign
Dr. Johndan Johnson-Eilola, Clarkson University

INSTITUTE CONTENTS
Approaches to Integrating Computers into Writing Classrooms (CIWIC-AIC)
In its twentieth year, CIWIC-AIC provides a space for participants to
explore the thoughtful integration of technology in composition and other
classrooms by examining the value of such tools as electronic
conferencing, text and visual composition software, print and Web design,
digital video, and sound editing, as well as technology-enhanced
assignment design and lab management strategies.

Integrating New Media into Writing Classrooms (CIWIC-NM)
CIWIC-NM participants learn graphics and authoring software for composing
multimedia texts. They also use those texts - as well as student - and
commercially-produced multimedia - as grounds for discussing and
developing compositional and rhetorical approaches for teaching both the
interpretation and the development of new media texts in writing-intensive
classrooms.

Individual Projects (CIWIC-IP)
CIWIC-IP is an institute for past CIWIC participants who want to take on a
more focused project. Past participants have worked on designing
distance-education courses that incorporate email, the Internet, and
Instructional Television; designing a Web-based student publication realm
using Perl, JavaScript, CGI scripting, and PHP; and composing articles for
publication. CIWIC-IP participants receive one-on-one instruction and
support from a CIWIC staff member specializing in the participant's field
of interest.

DATES AND FACILITIES
CIWIC-AIC, CIWIC-NM, and CIWIC-IP run concurrently for two weeks, June
1-14, 2005, consisting of 10 six-hour days with optional lunch and evening
sessions.

All three institutes use a state-of-the-art computer facility, Michigan
Tech's Center for Computer-Assisted Language Instruction (CCLI). In
addition to attending regularly scheduled sessions, participants have
24-hour access to the lab for additional explorations and practice.
Cynthia Selfe, Anne Wysocki, Richard Selfe, and a team of knowledgeable
student consultants provide one-on-one instruction-on both Macintosh and
PC platforms-in developing and using applications suited for participants'
own classrooms and Writing/English programs. All participants receive
three semester-hours of graduate credit.

Participants need have no previous computer knowledge; individualized
instruction will be provided. At the same time, participants who do have
extensive experience with computers will find plenty of challenges and
room to explore within the framework of the workshop. Participants from
all educational levels are encouraged to attend.

Enrollment is limited. Apply early!

Lastly, 2005 marks the 20th anniversary of CIWIC and we are planning a
celebration in Houghton and putting out a call for papers, speakers, and
all interested in adventure. We would like to welcome back all past
attendees of CIWIC and all of our friends who have spoken at our summer
institute over the years. We are also orchestrating a series of special
parties and celebrations during the two weeks of June 1 to June 14, 2005.
So, come and join us for the anniversary party!

For more information and registration materials, visit our website at
http://www.hu.mtu.edu/ciwic or contact Alex Ilyasova by email at
ciwic@mtu.edu or by phone at 906-487-3234 (office) or 906-487-2582 (lab).
MLA Convention Annual WPA Reception

PLEASE JOIN US AT THE

ANNUAL WPA RECEPTION

MLA CONVENTION

PHILADELPHIA, PA


WHEN:  Wed., Dec. 29, 2004, from 5-7 p.m.

WHERE: 10th Floor, Hilton Garden Inn


Details: If you'll be at the MLA convention in Philadelphia this year--or if you live in the Philly area--the Council of Writing Program Administrators is pleased to invite you and your guests for drinks, hors d'oeuvres, and the WPA's characteristic good cheer at the Hilton Garden Inn, located next to the Philadelphia Convention Center and close to all the major convention hotels. The hotel address is 1100 Arch St. The reception will take place on the 10th floor, next to "The Tenth Floor Grill," the hotel's rooftop restaurant.

Thanks to the generosity of McGraw-Hill and the University Writing Program at Temple University, the reception will feature a jazz band and food.

If you'd like to pinpoint the exact location of the hotel, you can find a map of the convention center area and locations of all the convention hotels at the MLA's Web site at the following link: http://www2.expoedge.com/its/0412mlaphl/map.asp

The Hilton's Web site is: http://www.hiltongardenphilly.com/

Hope to see you there!
 

Chris Anson, President, WPA

4C's Meeting of the National Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs

The 24th annual meeting at 4C's of the National Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 PM on Friday, March 26 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Councourse Level, Room 214B.

As customary, the agenda of the meeting is set by those attending: your questions, issues, problems, success stories, and concerns about WAC/WID program initiation and leadership will be the topics of the small groups that we will form; each group is led by a member of the consultants board of the network. Frequent topics include ways of working with faculty and administrators, funding, continuity, assessment, and course requirements (e.g., writing-intensive courses).

By request, one of next week's breakout groups will focus on Writing Fellows programs, so those of you with such programs in place may wish to bring materials to share or discuss. If you are planning or beginning such a program, you are invited to join this session at the meeting.

Announcing a new journal: Across the Disciplines: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Language, Learning, and Academic Writing
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/

The WAC Clearinghouse and the editors of Language and Learning Across the
Disciplines
and Academic.Writing are pleased to announce a new refereed
journal, Across the Disciplines: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Language,
Learning, and Academic Writing
. The new journal is the result of a merger
between Language and Learning Across the Disciplines and Academic.Writing
and will be edited by Sharon Quiroz.

Across the Disciplines extends the mission of its parent journals of
supporting scholarly exchange about the theory, research, and practice of
writing across the curriculum, communication across the curriculum, and
writing in the academy. This refereed journal is housed in the WAC
Clearinghouse at http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/. Subscriptions are not
required and all materials published in the journal are freely available to
readers.

This first volume of Across the Disciplines includes a special issue, edited
by Carra Leah Hood, that brings together a collection of essays and
photography the impact of the events of September 11, 2001, on our teaching
and our students' learning. This special issue includes work by scholars
including Leonard Cassuto, Karla Jay, Stanley N. Katz, Regina M. Buccola,
Timothy Dean Draper, John Freeman, Peter G. Beidler, Nell Ruby, and Fiona
Nelson.
Call for WPA Grant Proposals

CALL FOR YEAR 2004 RESEARCH GRANT PROPOSALS

The Research Grant Committee of the Council of Writing Program Administrators invites research proposals to investigate issues and practices in writing program administration. Maximum awards of $2000 may be given; average awards are $1000. All current WPA members are eligible to apply. Please organize your proposal as follows:

1. A cover page that gives the names of all investigators (please don’t identify yourself or your institution in the rest of the proposal), mailing addresses, email addresses and phone numbers.

2. A narrative of no more than two pages single-spaced in which you --explain the problem your research will attempt to solve and how the project will solve the problem you identify. The problems should be an issue of common concern to WPAs --give a timetable detailing how the project will proceed --connect the project to previous published research and scholarship --describe your expertise in this area --describe how the results will be shared professionally (See "Expectations of Reward Recipients" below.)

3. A realistic, detailed budget on a separate page.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION

You may find the following criteria useful in preparing your proposal; WPA Grant Committee will use these to conduct blind reviews of all proposals.

1. Relevance: The project is relevant to the work of writing program administrators, it applies to contexts outside of the immediate institutional context of origin, and writing program administrators will benefit from the outcomes of this project.

2. Contribution: The project not only is related to prior scholarship and research but also makes an original contribution.

3. Proposer’s Past Scholarship/Expertise: Through prior research and expertise, the proposer is well-prepared to undertake this project.

4. Methods: The methodology is clear, workable, and appropriate to this project.

5. Feasibility: The proposer can reasonably complete the project in the proposed time frame.

6. Cost Effectiveness: The budget expenditures are reasonable and the project’s outcomes justify the project’s expenses.

Restrictions: Ordinarily, you will not receive funding for released time for the grantee or others; for purely local initiatives or projects with little relevance to other settings; for outside consultants or evaluators; for the production of non-researched materials; for dissertation research; or for supplements to existing grants, unless it is clear that the WPA grant provides an opportunity to extend the project in new directions. You may not submit more than one proposal per year. The Committee will give first consideration for awards to those who have not received an award for three years.

EXPECTATIONS OF REWARD RECIPIENTS

1. Grantees are expected to submit articles resulting from the research to WPA:Writing Program Administration for first consideration.

2. Grantees are expected to offer a poster presentation of research results at the annual CCCC’s WPA breakfast in the year during which the award is granted.

3. Grantees are expected to submit a final written report of their research outcomes to the Chair of the Research Grants Committee by June 15 of the year after they receive the award. Ordinarily, reports will be 5-7 pages in length. In some circumstances, grantees may need some more space, in which case a report of up to 10 pages is acceptable. These reports should outline specific plans for submitting an article reporting the results to the WPA journal as well as other plans for dissemination.

Please send four copies of the proposal to Meg Morgan at the address below, postmarked no later than January 30, 2004:

Meg Morgan Chair, WPA Research Grant Committee
Department of English
University of North Carolina Charlotte
9201 University City Blvd.
Charlotte, NC 28223-0001

You may also submit proposals on line to mpmorgan@email.uncc.edu. They must be sent by 5:00 pm on January 30, 2004. Winners will be announced at the 2004 WPA breakfast in San Antonio.
2004 Summer Institute for Writing Center Directors and Professionals
For more information: http://www.clarku.edu/writing/iwca/index.shtml

We are pleased to announce that registration is now available for the 2004 Summer Institute for Writing Center Directors and Professionals. The second annual Summer Institute will be held on the campus of Clark University in Worcester, MA, from July 11 to 16, 2004. Co-sponsored by Clark, Marquette University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the International Writing Centers Association, the Summer Institute offers new writing center directors (and established directors starting a new program or interested in new ideas) at all instructional levels the chance to spend a week with leaders in the field discussing and learning about topics essential to writing center work. The co-hosts of the 2004 Summer Institute are Paula Gillespie (Marquette University), Anne Ellen Geller (Clark University), and Neal Lerner  (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Leaders are Michele Eodice (University of Kansas), Dawn Fels (University City High School in St. Louis), Carol Peterson Haviland (Cal. State San Bernardino), Harvey Kail (University of Maine), Howard Tinberg (Bristol Community College in Fall River, MA), and Jill Pennington (Lansing Community College).

The Summer Institute registration fee is $499 and is limited to 40 participants. For more information, go to http://www.clarku.edu/writing/iwca/index.shtml or email Anne Ellen Geller (angeller@clarku.edu) or Paula Gillespie (paula.gillespie@marquette.edu) or Neal Lerner (nlerner@mit.edu).
Call for Submissions: academic.writing/Language and Learning Across the Disciplines
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu

Advance notice of special issue:

LLAD Logo

WAC, WID, ECAC, CAC, CXC, LAC-VAC?

Incorporating the Visual into Writing/ Electronic /Communication/Learning
Across the Curriculum

Disciplines across the curriculum increasingly respond to the visual culture into which our students graduate-and from which they come. This issue will explore the use of visuals to teach, to construct and deconstruct knowledge; specific disciplinary expectations concerning visuals as end products/forms of communication; the production, changes and/or effects visual technologies (from paper to screen) have had on our field; the intersections between/among visual/written/spoken pedagogies and productions across disciplines/interdisciplines; ways in which brain activity dedicated to writing intersects/affects/changes visual production. These broad areas can lead to specific articles that explore questions such as:

How does/can visual theories/pedagogy support learning/writing in disciplines?

What differences in visual pedagogies, knowledge construction, and/or  communication expectations exist in different disciplines? In interdisciplines?

If linguistic and cultural variations affect language/knowledge acquisition in universities, how do these variations affect the use and production of visuals in global DL courses or in our globally diverse classrooms?

How does our use of visuals exclude/accommodate the visually impaired (including color-impaired visual learners)?

What theories and research not only inform our current disciplinary practices, but will help us accommodate new pedagogies necessary for the future production of visuals in disciplines/a global community?

How can current discoveries in the sciences (e.g., neurological, psychological, physiological) that inform ways in which we perceive/produce images shape our theories/pedagogies/understandings?

Deadline for Proposals: September, 2004. Submit a one page proposal outlining your topic, the research base upon which you will draw, and the outline of  how you will discuss the study, data, theory/practice to be developed.

Send electronically (prefer MS Word) to joan.mullin@utoledo.edu. Inquiries via email or 419-530-4913


Notification of Acceptance:
  November 2004

 

Manuscripts Due:  June 1 2005

 

Publication:   Fall 2005

Pamela Childers Named IWCA 2003 Outstanding Service Award Winner

Pam ChildersEvery three years, the International Writing Centers Association membership nominates and the committee of previous winners selects the winner of the IWCA Outstanding Service Award. This past weekend, Jeanne Simpson, 2000 Award recipient and president of the organization in the early 1980s, presented the 2003 IWCA Muriel Harris Outstanding Service Award at the IWCA Conference in Hershey, PA.

Below is a copy of the speech that Jeanne Simpson made.

International Writing Centers Association 2003 Outstanding Service Award Presentation Speech

This year's recipient of the Muriel Harris Outstanding Service Award is one of two nominees, both excellent members of our professional community. I thank all who submitted nominations for their time and for the generous spirit with which they were offered. And I thank the committee for their work and for making things easy by choosing this year's recipient in a unanimous vote.

Our recipient is one of the most loved members of the IWCA. Her creativity and humor have delighted us all for many years. She smiles, keeps up with our lives, and shares in our celebrations and sorrows. With every presentation or workshop she offers, she expands our vision of how to teach, how to involve and be involved, how to take risks. Above all, she reminds us constantly that taking our work seriously doesn't require us to be solemn; she loves uninhibited silliness and can persuade the most reluctant to participate.

Pam Childers is a past president of the IWCA and has served continuously on the executive board for so long, she probably thinks it is a life sentence. She was responsible for the Writing Center Directory for many years, securing funding for the directory from The McCallie School. She has served the IWCA and published on writing centers without the support or the rewards that a college or university faculty member can expect, attending many IWCA Executive Board meetings at NCTE, CCCC, and the IWCA Conferences.

No one has done more to promote high school writing centers than she, and there isn't a close second here. Her collection, The High School Writing Center, is the only book on the subject and is essential reading for anyone who is directing or wants to direct a writing center in secondary education. In fact, it is essential reading for all writing center personnel, as a means of expanding their vision of how writing centers function. This book is just one of her many publications to support high school writing centers.

She makes sure that the IWCA keeps K-12 issues and situations in mind in its promotion and support of writing centers, and it is appropriate for the IWCA to recognize the importance of k-12 writing centers with the service award. As Jim McDonald wrote of Pam, "There are many deserving of recognition for their service to writing centers, but when I think of what service means, I can't come up with a better nomination than Pam Childers."

My friends, it is with deep pleasure that I present the 2003 Outstanding Service Award to Pam Childers.

New in the Teaching Exchange: Richard Young's Collection of
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/young/

The WAC Clearinghouse is proud to announce the availability of Richard E. Young's collection of writing-to-learn activities, Toward A Taxonomy of “Small” Genres and Writing Techniques for WAC. This collection of brief writing-to-learn activities emerged from a 1984 workshop series conducted by Richard E. Young and Joann Sipple at Robert Morris College in Pittsburgh. It is available online at the WAC Clearinghouse (see the URL above) in HTML and PDF format. Richard Young encourages readers of the collection to contribute their own "small genre" activities to the document.
WAC Journal Releases Volume 14
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/

logoThe WAC Journal The WAC Journal announces it's August 2003 volume, including an interview with John Bean, articles addresses WAC techniques and applications, WAC and WID, faculty development, and program strategies, and a review of Sue McLeod et al.'s WAC for the New Millenium.

2004 CCCC Annual Convention
For more information: http://www.ncte.org/convention/cccc2004/index.shtml

Making Composition Matter:
Students, Citizens, Institutions, Advocacy


CCCC Logo


Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
San Antonio, Texas
March 24-27, 2004


Call for Program Proposals

The Call for Program Proposals form for the 2004 CCCC Convention was mailed in March 2003 and a printable version is now available.  You may download and print the PDF version of the Call for Proposal Form!   Click here to submit your proposals online now.  Online proposals are due May 2, 2004.  Paper proposal forms must be postmarked by April 25, 2003.  

Clemson Digital Portfolio Institutes

The Pearce Center for Professional Communication is pleased to sponsor the Clemson Digital Portfolio Institutes:

Institute I (June 25 and 26)
Beginning with Digital Portfolios: Models, Practices, Opportunities for Learning.

Institute II (June 30 and July 1)
Advanced Institute: Scoring Guides and the Assessment of Digital Portfolios; The Design of Digital Portfolios

Institute III (July 2 and 3)
Researching the Two Issues: Relationships between Digital Links and Cognitive Connections; and the Reading, Reviewing, and Assessing of Digital Portfolios

The Clemson Digital Portfolio Institutes are open to educators from all disciplines. The Institutes will be led by faculty from Clemson, including Kathleen Blake Yancey, Director of the Pearce Center and consultant to several portfolio programs around the country. The Institute will include 20 spaces for faculty from across the country each in Institute I and II. These two institutes will cost $500 each per person. To register and for additional information, please contact Kathleen Yancey at 864-656-5394 or at
kyancey@clemson.edu.
National Network of WAC Programs SIG at CCCC 2003
For more information: http://wac.gmu.edu/national/national.html

The annual Special Interest Group meeting of the National Network of WAC Programs at CCCC on Thursday, March 20, from 6:30-7:30 PM in the New York Suite on the 4th floor. As always, the main order of business will be informal issues-and-problems discussions led by experienced WAC directors/consultants.

Each year for the past 23, the meeting has attracted directors and planners of new, changing, and ongoing WAC programs who want to network with colleagues and hear practical responses to their concerns and questions about aspects of program development.

You'll also, if you wish, be able to join the Network or renew memberships at the meeting. For more information, please contact Chris Thaiss, WAC Network Coordinator, at (703) 993-1273 or cthaiss@GMU.EDU.

The UNC Charlotte Wildacres' 2003 Annual WAC/WID Retreat

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is pleased to announce the Wildacres 2003 Retreat. This year's focus will be "Writing in the Disciplines: What Works and What Doesn't." Each year, faculty in the disciplines, WAC/WID administrators and/or faculty, and writing faculty come from all over the United States to spend four days on top of a mountain in North Carolina. This year's retreat is May 12-15. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Chris Thaiss (George Mason University), and the workshop leaders will be Dr. Rebecca Burnett (Iowa State) and Dr. Chris Anson (NC State).The cost is only $300 for registration, lodging, and meals. If you're interested in attending, send an email to Deborah S. Bosley (dsbosley@email.uncc.edu) and she will send you a brochure.

Language Connections Receives Update
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/books/language_connections/

Language Connections: Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum, edited by Toby Fulwiler and Art Young, is available in an updated (read: fewer typos, better formatting) version at http://wac.colostate.edu/books/language_connections/. Thanks to Heidi Scott for her fine work of editing and reformatting the book.

LLAD Releases Issues 5.2 and 5.3 to the Web
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/llad/

Issues 5.2 and 5.3 of Language and Learning Across the Disciplines have been added to the LLAD Web site at http://wac.colostate.edu/llad/. In addition, LLAD has posted a new call for submissions for a special issues on WAC and linguistically diverse students.

Academic.Writing Releases New Work
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/aw/

Academic.Writing is pleased to announce the recent addition of work to its latest volume. Pam Childers' column on writing in secondary settings addresses the questions of why teachers write. Dan Melzer's CAC Connections offers a comprehensive update on happenings in the WAC and CAC communities.

Volume 13 of The WAC Journal is Now Online
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/

logoThe WAC Journal announces its latest issue, volume 13. This volume marks the first fully "national" edition of the journal, which has grown over the past decade from a local publication of Plymouth State College to a peer-reviewed publication drawing contributions from scholars across the United States. The journal is available in print by subscription and online for no charge through the Clearinghouse.

Seventh National WAC Conference Announced
For more information: http://muconf.missouri.edu/WAC2004

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Information about the Seventh National WAC Conference is now available on the conference Web site. Scheduled for May 20-22, 2004, the conference will be directed by Marty Townsend of the University of Missouri at Columbia. Electronic proposals are due Friday, October 31, 2003, via the conference website.

The conference Web site notes "this biennial event is the largest U.S. conference dedicated to writing across the curriculum (WAC) and writing in the disciplines (WID). It is typically of interest to people using writing to improve teaching and learning—faculty, administrators, and students from post-secondary institutions, as well as faculty and administrators from secondary schools."

The conference organizers note that the conference theme, WAC From an International Perspective, "is intended to draw attention to the myriad ways that WAC and WID are conceptualized, understood, and used both within and beyond the U.S. Over the last thirty years in the U.S., the WAC educational movement has grown steadily, primarily in higher education and, to a lesser extent, at the secondary level. Over the same period, the LAC (language across the curriculum) movement in the U.K. has also grown, primarily at the secondary level; more recently, LAC has begun to appear at the post-secondary level. More notable, though, is an increased interest in diverse countries around the globe in higher education's use of writing as a tool for teaching and learning."

Visit the Web site for more information about the conference.

Art Young Honored with CCCC Exemplar Award
For more information: http://wac.colostate.edu/aw/observations/young_announcement.htm

Art YoungArthur P. Young of Clemson University received the coveted CCCC Exemplar Award in Chicago on Thursday, March 21, 2002, at the General Session of the annual Conference on College Composition and Communication. Cynthia Lewiecki-Wilson, Chair of the Exemplar Award Committee, presented the award, describing Art as "an exemplary model of the scholar, teacher, and administrator in composition studies."

The complete article can be found at the URL listed above.