Conferences & Events

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Past Conferences and Events

Writing Research Across Borders IV

Location: Bogota, Colombia
Date: February 15, 2017 to February 18, 2017
URL: http://www.wrab2017.com.
Description:

Writing Research Across Borders (WRAB) IV

International Society for the Advancement of Writing Research - ISAWR invites you to the Fourth World Conference on Writing Research 

15th - 18th February, 2017

www.wrab2017.com

Bogotá, Colombia, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

 

Call for proposals Proposal Deadline 1st April, 2016

The International Society for the Advancement of Writing Research (ISAWR) is composed of researchers from all over the world interested in writing across all education levels. 

ISAWR's Writing Research Across Borders conference is currently the most important global research meeting on writing research and is aimed at discussing topics related with writing and knowledge production across different levels of education. In seven years, the WRAB Conference has promoted the exchange of approaches, the regular updating and the creation of networks to carry out research and international projects. In order to share experiences and research on reading and writing from all over the world, more fully with the work in Latin America and the Caribbean, the next Conference will be held in Bogotá, Colombia, February 2017. 

Previous WRAB conferences were: Writing Research Across Borders (2008) – University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA Writing Research Across Borders II (2011) - George Mason University, de Fairfax, Northern Virginia, USA Writing Research Across Borders III (2014) - Université Paris-Ouest Nanterre La Défense, Paris, France 

The Conference Organizers invite proposals for presentations, symposia, round tables, and posters from all perspectives and methods, as well as directed to all levels of writing development.

Calendar

Deadline for submission of proposals: April 1, 2016

Proposal acceptance notices sent: June 2016

Proposers must accept the invitation and register for the conference in order to appear on the program: of October 31, 2016.


Creative Connectivity: Thinking, Writing and the Translation of Information to Understanding

Location: Quinnipiac Univeristy, Hamden, CT USA
Date: November 18, 2016 to November 19, 2016
URL: https://www.qu.edu/institutes-and-centers/writing-acros ....
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Description:
Featuring the Keynote Address

The Meaningful Writing Project: A Site of Creative Connectivity
Michele Eodice, University of Oklahoma
Neal Lerner, Northeastern University
Anne Ellen Geller, St. John's University

The three co-directors of The Meaningful Writing Project were the recipients of the Best Poster Award at the 2015 Conference on College Composition and Communication. Their research was supported by a 2010-2011 CCCC Research Initiative Grant. Their book, The Meaningful Writing Project: Learning, Teaching, and Writing in Higher Education will be published by Utah State University Press in 2017.

Conference Rates:

· Full-Time Faculty: Full conference, $300; Saturday only, $150

· Part-Time Faculty: Full conference, $150; Saturday only, $75

· Graduate Students: Full conference, $100; Saturday only, $50

Register online: https://www.applyweb.com/public/register?s=quinwrit

Registration deadline: Friday, November 11, 2016

Friday Evening Conversation: Following protocols developed for the Meaningful Writing Project, QUWAC will facilitate live interviews with Quinnipiac students and faculty who have agreed to share their experiences with writing. The students are majors in biology, education, and engineerng; their  complementary faculty members teach biology, education, and first year writing. 

Consultations: The keynote speakers will be available during the concurrent sessions to meet with individuals and groups interested in discussing the challenges faced by their programs. To make an appointment, contact the Research and Writing Institute Director: Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu

Accommodations: Rooms are available at the Clarion Inn and Suites on Whitney Avenue in Hamden for a conference rate of $104 plus tax/night. Frequent and free shuttle service will be provided from the hotel, which is three miles from Quinnipiac's Mount Carmel campus. For reservations, call 203-288-3831. Reservation may also be made online: https://www.choicehotels.com/connecticut/hamden/clarion-hotels/ct067?source=gyxt

Transportation:
We are near Bradley International Airport (1hr) and Tweed New Haven Airport (20 minutes). International travelers arriving at Kennedy Airport should expect at least a two hour commute to the campus. We may also be reached via Amtrak, Metro-North Railroad, and Shore Line East Railroad, which provide service to Union Station, New Haven.

Connecticut Limousine provides ground transportation from Bradley to Union Station in New Haven. The cost for a shared ride is about $47 one way/$94 round trip: https://ctlimo.com/

Metro Taxi provides service from Union Station to the hotel or conference. Expect to pay about $36 for a 18 minute ride: http://www.metrotaxict.com/index.htm

Our Theme: Connectivity in its diverse and expanding forms – technological, institutional, global, social, neurobiological, linguistic, and textual - has a profound effect on the way we process, comprehend and apply what we learn. The exponential growth and complexity of knowledge, along with our virtually unlimited access to it, have enhanced the need to make meaningful connections between what we know and what we seek to understand. In an educational environment that is increasingly dependent on the ability to forge connections, how are meaningful connections made? By whom and for whom are they made? How is the need for creative connectivity evidenced in the classroom? What role does connectivity play in the achievement of learning outcomes? 

Creative Connectivity, is intended to explore the many ways that writing, as a critical and reflective practice, can be used to support the creation of deep and meaningful connections within and across the range of experiences that contribute to learning: first-year writing, disciplinary seminars, general education requirements, major and minor programs of study, professional internships, and co-curricular activities. We welcome presentations that explore pedagogical approaches to integrating writing in ways that 
  • articulate and witness commonalities and differences across a range of learning experiences
  • facilitate the application of language to thought, and thought to language
  • deepen understanding by observing synergies and distinctions among related course concepts
  • foster inquiry and reflection in ways that broaden knowledge and the opportunity to establish linkages across disciplinary divides
  • integrate co-curricular and curricular experiences
  • create new opportunities for faculty-to-faculty, student-to-faculty, and student to-student dialogue
  • identify and foster connections between student experiences, assignments, and outcomes
  • recognize and appreciate disciplinary distinctions; collaborate across disciplines, and create new modes of inquiry
  • connect thinking across a range of academic cultures and social media
  • bridge academic and professional identities 
 

What is the Meaningful Writing Project?

The intent of the Meaningful Writing Project is to understand how students across three very different institutions--a private, urban Catholic university (undergraduate enrollment: 14,000); a private, urban university known for experien- tial learning (undergraduate enrollment: 15,600); and a public R1 institution (undergraduate enrollment: 20,000)--make meaning from their writing.

We found that meaningful writing projects offer students opportunities for agency; for engagement with instructors, peers, and materials; and for learning that connects to pre- vious experiences and passions and to future aspirations and identities. Students described the power of personal connection, the thrill of immersion in thought, writing and research, and the satisfaction of knowing the work they produced could be applicable, relevant, and real world. Faculty who taught courses in which meaningful writing took place often deliberately build these qualities into their teaching and curriculum, expressing their goals and values for writing through specific practices.

The Researchers:

Michele Eodice is the Associate Provost for Academic Engagement and director of the OU Writing Center at the University of Oklahoma. Michele’s current research explores creative knowing in engineering and doctoral student writing experiences. Among her publications, two books are the products of important collaborations: (First Person)2 : A Study of Co-Authoring in the Academy (2001), written with Kami Day, and The Everyday W riting Center: A Community of Practice (2007), written with Anne Ellen Geller, Frankie Condon, Meg Carroll, and Elizabeth H. Boquet. In 2013 she published W orking with Faculty W riters with Anne Ellen Geller as co-editor.

At St. John’s University in Queens, New York, Anne Ellen Geller is Associate Professor of English and Director of Writing Across the Curriculum, which was awarded a 2013 Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) Writing Program Certificate of Excellence. She teaches undergraduate and graduate English courses, directs a writing fellows program and works with faculty across the disciplines. Anne’s research and published writing, twice recognized with the International Writing Centers Association Outstanding Scholarship Award, focuses on writing cen- ters, writing across the curriculum, support for faculty and student writers, co-authorship, and National Endowment for the Humanities funding of writing programs.

Neal Lerner is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Writing Program at Northeastern University in Boston, MA, which was a 2014 recipient of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) Writing Program Certificate of Excellence. He has published on the history, theory, administration, and practice of teaching writing in classrooms, laboratories, and writing centers, and is a five-time IWCA Outstanding Scholarship Award recipient. His book The Idea of a W riting Laboratory won the 2011 NCTE David H. Russell Award, and he is also co-author of Learning to Communicate as a Scientist and Engineer: Case Studies from MIT, winner of the 2012 CCCC Advancement of Knowledge Award, and co-author of The Longman Guide to Peer Tutoring, 2nd ed.

 


CWPA 2016 Conference: Engaging Multiple Perspectives in and about Writing Program Administration

Location: Raleigh, NC
Date: July 14, 2016 to July 17, 2016
URL: http://wpacouncil.org/node/7032.
Contact: Susan Miller-Cochran or Anushka Peres at millercochran@email.arizona.edu or aperes@email.arizona.edu
Description:

Engaging Multiple Perspectives in and about Writing Program Administration

CWPA 2016 Call for Proposals

Raleigh, North Carolina

July 14-17, 2016

 

AN INVITATION

Recent calls for proposals in our journals and professional conferences in rhetoric and composition have highlighted the growing need to pay attention to a wider range of perspectives in our work. Professional organizations, conferences, writing programs, and writing courses have not always been welcoming and relevant to many who have also found their work, perspectives, and histories excluded from scholarly conversations.

 

Our work as writing program administrators is, and should be, impacted by the multiplicities of who we are and by the subjectivities of our students, colleagues, and staff. Therefore, we need a broad range of voices at the table when we make decisions about our curricula and assessment practices, our programs, and our profession. The field, as well as individual programs and classrooms, needs to encourage an environment that respects the necessity of a variety of perspectives that are both present and absent.

 

The annual conference gives us a space to invite multiple perspectives and to learn from each other. At our 2016 conference in Raleigh, North Carolina--a space of recent political tension, local activism, and persistent racial inequality--I ask that we examine through a critical lens who has been included in and excluded from conversations about writing programs and how we can encourage a broader dialogue. The following questions offer suggestions for topics you might address, but please do not feel limited by them:

?      What concerns should writing programs be engaged in addressing at this moment?

?      What does it mean to be a WPA?

?      Who identifies as a writing program administrator? Why might people choose to identify (or not to identify) with this professional community?

?      What does it mean to “belong” to this community of writing program administrators?

?      Where does WPA work occur? What are the locations of writing program administration?

?      What are the frames/lenses/terms that can help us examine our work in important ways? For example, would the frames of intersectionality, assemblage, belonging, inclusion, and/or diversity help us rethink assumptions about WPA work?

?      Who have we included, and who have we excluded, in the scholarship we have conducted, the policies we have enacted, and the statements we have made?

?      How has writing program administration research excluded investigations of (dis)ability, race, sexual orientation, culture, and other important social dimensions that construct difference in our world?

?      What proactive, real actions can WPAs take--or have you taken--in writing courses, programs, and/or the profession so that we invite a range of voices and perspectives to the table, especially those who critically challenge current directions?

?      How can we effectively mentor and provide relevant professional development and support to a range of students, faculty, staff, and WPAs?

?      What are the shifting demographics at our institutions, and how should writing programs respond to those changes?

?      What curricular designs and assessment models are most inclusive of a range of abilities, orientations, and perspectives? What can we learn about our current curricular and assessment assumptions? What work in other disciplines might inform the work of WPAs?

?      What is the status of working conditions in writing programs on our campuses, and how can we work to improve those conditions for all instructors?

?      What proactive steps can we take to include the perspectives, needs, and goals of writing teachers from a range of ranks and positions (e.g., graduate student, non-tenure-track, staff, tenure-track) in decision-making and planning?

?      What outreach, activism, and advocacy work could writing programs engage in?

 

CWPA is eager to welcome those who participate in "writing program administration" writ large. This could include work with: writing centers; multiple sections or instructors of writing courses; professional and technical writing programs; community writing programs; ESL writing programs; WAC and WID programs; course and program assessment; or any other work that is related to writing instruction or program direction.

 

OPPORTUNITIES AT THE 2016 CONFERENCE

There are three parts to the annual conference that you might participate in:

?      The pre-conference workshop for writing program administrators (July 10-13) with workshop leaders Sheila Carter-Tod, Heidi Estrem, Peggy O’Neill, and Chuck Paine. We will offer two workshops this year to accommodate more participants.

?      The pre-conference institutes (July 14). New this year: instead of pre-determining the three institutes we will offer, we invite proposals for full-day institutes on topics of relevance for WPAs. See proposal information below.

?      Conference (July 14-17): we invite proposals for full panels, individual presentations, and interactive workshops as part of the conference schedule. See proposal information below.

 

PROPOSING A CONFERENCE PRESENTATION OR INSTITUTE

You can propose up to two speaking roles, whether an institute and a conference presentation or two conference presentations.

 

A.    Conference Presentations

1. 15-minute individual presentations

Presenters may submit individual paper or presentation proposals; these will be combined into panels/sessions of three or four speakers on the program.

 

2. Full session panel of multiple presentations

These may take any form you choose. Two popular formats have been:

 

Conversation Starters: panels in which a number of speakers give six-minute presentations on a particular topic and then open the floor to a conversation about that topic. Proposals should address (a) the question/topic you want to address or point you want to make; (b) the exigency for your question—why is this important/significant for WPAs? (c) the issues you’d like participants to take up in conversation. Plan to allow at least 30-45 minutes for conversation among the participants.

 

Panel Sessions: These would consist of three or four 15-minute individual presentations connected by a particular theme. Plan to allow at least 15-20 minutes for questions and discussion.

 

If you are proposing a full session panel, please clearly indicate in the proposal description which of the above categories your proposal falls into; if you are doing something different, please explain that, too.

 

3. Interactive workshop

A full session (75-minute) workshop designed to address a particular issue of relevance to WPAs. Workshops might address how to revise one’s work for publication, how to put together a promotion and tenure dossier, how to prepare for a program review, how to lead as a new WPA, and so on.

 

B.    Pre-Conference Institutes (Thursday)

New this year! In the spirit of welcoming a range of voices and perspectives, we invite proposals for full-day pre-conference institutes. We will offer three institutes on the program. Institutes are interactive and practical spaces for WPAs to learn about topics such as program assessment, preparing for the job market, conducting administrative research, working with various student populations, writing grant proposals, writing as a WPA, leading effective professional development activities in a writing program (to name a few). Independent of how many co-leaders participate in the institute, institutes chosen for the program will be given:

?      two free registrations for the conference (for two of the leaders)

?      a $1000 honorarium (to be divided among the leaders)

?      two rooms at the conference hotel for Wednesday night

?      $60 toward a planning meal on Wednesday night

 

SHOULD YOUR SESSION BE LISTED IN A STRAND?

At the 2016 CWPA conference, we will feature three strands of sessions, and you can indicate your desire to be featured in one of the strands in your proposal:

 

A. Mentoring Strand Sessions

A strand of sessions at the 2016 conference in Raleigh will again be devoted to professional development and mentoring issues. If you are submitting a proposal in any format to talk about mentoring (broadly defined), please indicate so in the proposal; it will be directed to Joe Janangelo, chair of the CWPA Mentoring Project, for review. Also feel encouraged to email jjanang@luc.edu to let him know that you have submitted a proposal intended for the mentoring strand. For more details, please visit the CWPA Mentoring Project on the CWPA website.

 

B. People of Color Caucus Sessions

CWPA's People of Color Caucus will offer a strand of sessions at the 2016 conference devoted to issues of racial and ethnic diversity in writing program administration related to scholars, teachers, students, and administrators of color. If you are submitting a proposal in any format that relates to issues appropriate for this strand, please indicate so in the proposal; it will be directed to Genevieve Garcia de Mueller, chair of the CWPA POC Caucus, for review. Also feel encouraged to email genevieve.garcademeller@utrgv.edu to let her know that you have submitted a proposal intended for the POC Caucus strand.

 

C. Two-Year College Caucus Sessions

CWPA's Two-Year College Caucus will offer a strand of sessions at the 2016 conference devoted to topics related to, involving, and discussing the contexts of two-year colleges. If you are submitting a proposal in any format that relates to issues appropriate for this strand, please indicate so in the proposal; it will be directed to Daniel Cleary, chair of the CWPA Two-Year College Caucus, for review. Also feel encouraged to email dcleary@lorainccc.edu to let him know that you have submitted a proposal intended for the Two-Year College Caucus strand.

 

SUBMITTING YOUR PROPOSAL

We will begin to receive submissions for the 2016 conference on November 15, 2015. Visit http://wpacouncil.org/cwpa-2016-proposal-instructions at that time to submit a proposal.

 

Deadlines:

?     January 1, 2016: final deadline for Institute Proposals; expedited review deadline for Conference Proposals

?     March 1, 2016: final deadline for Conference Proposals

 

For local Raleigh, NC questions email: Jessie Moore (jmoore28@elon.edu)

For CWPA proposal questions email: Susan Miller-Cochran (millercochran@email.arizona.edu) or Anushka Peres (aperes@email.arizona.edu


International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference 2016: Writing Across Difference

Location: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Date: June 23, 2016 to June 26, 2016
URL: https://www.facebook.com/iwaccon?_rdr=p.
Description:

The Sweetland Center for Writing at the University of Michigan is pleased to announce that the 2016 International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference will be held June 23-26 in Ann Arbor. The Call for Proposals is life and the deadline for proposals is November 1, 2015.? You can learn more at https://iwac2016.org/cfp/.

Conference Theme: “Writing Across Difference”

Does writing across disciplinary differences risk writing over other kinds of differences? IWAC 2016 will focus on situating the cross-disciplinarity of WAC/WID within a pedagogy of inclusivity by asking how our pedagogy can broaden ideas of difference within and beyond the classroom to include social, cultural, linguistic, modal, and media differences, among others. In WAC/WID scholarship, writing ideally circulates among these differences, establishes connections and highlights points of conflict, and potentially situates WAC/WID scholars and teachers as agents of change. We welcome proposals that explore ways in which WAC/WID can promote a dialogue on difference and inclusivity and encourage representatives of different WAC/WID populations to offer their multiple voices and perspectives on WAC/WID today.

 

CGC Summer Institute: Bridging English Language Teaching and Writing Studies in Supporting All Graduate Writers

Location: Yale University, New Haven, CT
Date: June 9, 2016 to June 11, 2016
URL: http://gradconsortium.wordpress.com/summer2016/.
Contact: Nigel Caplan & Michelle Cox, Co-Chairs at michelle.cox@cornell.edu
Description:

This year’s theme focuses on graduate writing, especially the intersection of Writing Studies/Composition/Writing Across the Curriculum/writing center and ESL/ELT/EAP as we consider ways to support all graduate writers.

In this 2-and-a-half-day retreat for graduate communication specialists, we will hear from experts in the field, share ideas and experiences, and work in groups to develop graduate writing programs, courses, and research agendas. Building on our successful 2015 colloquium in Toronto, the CGC Summer Institute is an opportunity for us to roll up our sleeves and pursue our goals of supporting graduate writing skills across disciplines, across types of degree programs, and across diverse groups of graduate students.

Participants are encouraged to attend the Institute to develop a specific project in program, course, or research design for their local contexts. Keynotes, discussions, and working groups will provide ideas and opportunities for collaboration and writing.

Keynote speakers:

Michelle Cox, Cornell University
Mary Jane Curry, University of Rochester
Christine Feak, University of Michigan
Karyn Mallet, George Mason University
Talinn Phillips, Ohio University
Steve Simpson, New Mexico Tech

Sponsored by University of Michigan Press.

We look forward to seeing you at Yale in June!

Nigel Caplan & Michelle Cox, Co-Chairs
Jim Tierney, Local Chair (Yale University)
Steve Simpson & Talinn Phillips, Organizing Committee


WAC SIG at CCCC

Location: Houston, TX
Date: April 7, 2016 to April 7, 2016
URL: http://center.uoregon.edu/NCTE/2016CCCC/program/session ....
Description:

You are Invited to Attend the International Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum (WAC) Programs Special Interest Group at the Conference on College Composition and Communication

Thursday, April 7, 6:30-7:30pm (see conference program for room number)

This will be the 36th annual SIG meeting of the International (formerly National) Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum (WAC) Programs at CCCC. Since 1981, this CCCC SIG has offered a unique opportunity for those who lead WAC/WID efforts at schools, colleges, and universities or those who wish to begin or re-start such initiatives. Aside from a few announcements of upcoming events of interest at the beginning of the session, the SIG meeting takes place in small discussion groups facilitated by members of the Network Consultants Board (highly-experienced program leaders). These groups address questions and concerns of the participants in regard to any aspect of the development and sustaining of WAC/WID initiatives and programs. In addition, occasional discussion groups in recent years have considered such efforts as writing of the CCCC-endorsed Statement of WAC Principles and Practices in 2012-14.

Over the past ten years, this SIG has consistently drawn 35, 50, or more participants. Since the SIG was renamed "International" in 2005, approximately one quarter to one third of participants each year have come from institutions outside the U.S. Moreover, attending the SIG serves as an important step for those just beginning initiatives at their institutions, with approximately one half of participants each year self-identifying in this role.

The names listed in the proposal, in addition to the chair, are the members of the Board who will lead the discussion groups. They are not "speakers," but "facilitators" or "discussion leaders."

Presenter(s)


The International Conference on English Across the Curriculum

Location: Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Date: December 14, 2015 to December 15, 2015
URL: http://eacconference.elc.polyu.edu.hk/index.php/EAC/EAC ....
Contact: Dr. Julia Chen at eac2015@polyu.edu.hk
Description:

The International Conference on English Across the Curriculum will be held December 14-15, 2015, at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. This two-day conference will bring together academics from different disciplines and language teaching units to explore ways to enhance students' English in discipline content subjects.


Building Bridges through Academic Writing: Research, Policy, and Practice Third International Conference on Academic Writing in Israel

Location: Tel Avis, Israel
Date: June 27, 2015 to June 28, 2015
URL: http://mschcolnik.wix.com/ifaw#!archives/cfvg.
Description:

Building Bridges through Academic Writing: Research, Policy, and Practice: Third International Conference on Academic Writing in Israel

June 27-28, 2016
Conference Venue: MOFET, The Institute of Research,
Curriculum and Program Development for Teacher Educators, Tel Aviv, Israel


Academic writing has long been considered to be a bridge to learning in school and in higher education. We believe that in the 21st century academic writing should be a bridge to promoting current issues in other areas as well. We would like to invite you to share your knowledge and experience in all of these areas with both our local and international audiences.

The following topics will be addressed, as will any others related to the conference theme.

Research, policy, and practice of academic writing
? as a bridge to learning in school and in higher education.
? as a bridge to advancing professional, social, economic, technological, and political issues.

Important Dates:

Call for papers: June 7, 2015
Deadline for submission of abstracts: October 31, 2015
Notification of acceptance by: December 31, 2015
Conference: June 27-28, 2016

Further information about the conference (e.g., call for papers, registration, accommodation) will soon be available on our new conference website. For the programs and abstract books of our previous conferences see our current website:
http://mschcolnik.wix.com/ifaw#!archives/cfvg

Questions can be addressed to The Unit for Conferences and Study Days at The MOFET Institute.
event@macam.ac.il


WAC SIG at CCCC

Location: Tampa, Florida
Date: March 20, 2015 to March 20, 2015
URL: http://www.ncte.org/cccc/conv.
Contact: Chris Thaiss at cjthaiss@ucdavis.edu
Description:

The WAC SIG at CCCC

The International (formerly National) Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs has met at the CCCC convention each year since 1981. The popular small-group format continues to draw each year 40-70 participants, including program planners from a range of countries. In the small groups, each led a member of the INWAC Board of Consultants (all very experienced program leaders from a broad range of institutions within and outside the US), participants ask and receive answers to their questions regarding any aspect of beginning, sustaining, re-starting, or expanding their WAC/WID initiatives. The meeting also provides a short amount of time for announcement of conferences, research opportunities, and publications of interest to WAC program developers.

The WAC SIG will take place on Friday, 3/20, from 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM in the Tampa Convention Center, Room 1, First Floor.


Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Cultures: STEM, WAC/WID and the Changing Academy, Quinnipiac University Fifth Biennial Conference on Critical Thinking and Writing

Location: Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT
Date: November 21, 2014 to November 22, 2014
URL: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes-and-centers/writin ....
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta, Research and Writing Institute Coordinator at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Description:

Registration Open through Wednesday, November 19th

Fifth Biennial International Critical Thinking and Writing Conference:

Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Culture: STEM, WAC/WID, and the Changing Academy

Friday, November 21st and Saturday, November 22nd
Quinnipiac University, 275 Mount Carmel Avenue, Hamden, CT 06518

Hosted by QUWAC and the RWI, with support from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Office of Academic Affairs.

In 2008 The Times Literary Supplement included the publication of C. P. Snow’s 1959 Rede Lecture, The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution, on its list of the 100 books that have most influenced Western public discourse since the Second World War.  Although Snow’s lecture prompted a dustup between scientists and literary elites over who could lay claim to the superior form of knowledge, over time the sides and tenor of the “Two Cultures Debate” have changed.  As the debate has expanded throughout the natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences to include various disciplinary groups and the beliefs, attitudes, and perspectives with which they are bound together as “cultures,” it has evolved into a conversation about how knowledge is recognized, valued, and taught across the cultures of the university.  The 2014 conference aims to advance this conversation through presentations that attend to the unfolding legacy of the Two Cultures Debate as well as those that revisit and challenge Snow’s original formulation.

The conference will be organized into three categories, each focusing on a different dimension of the debate: Philosophy and Politics; Pedagogies, Programs, and Curricula; Critical Thinking and Writing.  The conference intends to promote, across categories, a multidimensional conversation that addresses the following questions (and perhaps others):

 

Friday Evening Conversation:

Vaughan Turekian, Chief International Officer, American Association for the Advancement of Science

“Science Diplomacy: Critical Thinking and Writing across the Academy and the World,”

Dr. Vaughan Turekian is the Chief International Officer for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In this role, he leads, develops and coordinates the broad range of AAAS’s international activities. He is also the Director of AAAS’s Center for Science Diplomacy and Editor-in-Chief of Science & Diplomacy, a quarterly publication from the Center. Both the Center and the publication aim to bring together stakeholders from the scientific and foreign policy communities to identify better ways to apply science cooperation to building relationships between and among nations.

On Friday evening, Turekian will discuss the work of the Center, which takes place in countries where diplomats do not or cannot normally go—Cuba, North Korea, Burma, Syria—to address problems in foreign policy by engaging partners in a process to develop a shared understanding of science issues and the language that defines them. Building upon this concept of science diplomacy, the conversation will explore how academics from across the disciplines and with widely divergent views understand “science,” as well as other common terms and practices, such as "research,” "diplomacy," and "critical thinking.”  This exchange is intended to elicit attitudes, beliefs, and perspectives in order to consider how they might interact with the disciplines to form cultures, and to reflect on how the various cultures of the university can meet continuously shifting global challenges.

 

Saturday Morning Keynote:

Kathleen Blake Yancey, Kellogg W. Hunt Professor and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University

“Concepts and Practices in Flux: Critical thinking and Writing across the Disciplinary Cultures of the Academy.”

An elected leader of many scholarly organizations—including the National Council of Teachers of English; the Conference on College Composition and Communication; and the  Council of Writing Program Administrators—Kathleen Blake Yancey is Editor of College Composition and Communication and Co-Director of the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research. She has focused much of her research on writing across the curriculum and writing assessment, especially portfolios, authoring or co-authoring over 70 articles and book chapters and authoring, editing, or co-editing eleven scholarly books—among them Portfolios in the Writing Classroom, Reflection in the Writing Classroom, Assessing Writing across the Curriculum, and Portfolios 2.0. Her co-authored Writing across Contexts: Composition, Transfer, and Sites of Writing, a study of the role that content and reflection play in students’ transfer of writing knowledge and practice from first-year composition into multiple sites of writing across the university, will be published in spring 2014. Her numerous awards include the  Florida State University Award for Graduate Teaching, the WPA Best Book Award, and the Donald Murray Writing Prize.

On Saturday morning, Yancey will present “Concepts and Practices in Flux: Critical Thinking and Writing Across the Disciplinary Cultures of the Academy.” Much like a big city with multiple neighborhoods—each with its own practices and rituals—college is a world with multiple cultures, which we think of as disciplines, each of which has its own language, its own problems, acceptable evidence, and genres. One important task for faculty, therefore, is to help students understand how a given culture is both similar to and different from other cultures within the academy. Doing so makes the implicit features of the discipline explicit and therefore available and helpful to our students. And because each student brings with him or her unique prior knowledge and experiences, it is critical that students are asked to map—for themselves—these similarities and differences and to articulate what they mean for thinking and writing in a given discipline. Drawing from experiences of both students and teachers in various disciplines, this talk will outline how such articulation and reflection can support student learning.

Yancey will be available on Saturday to consult with individuals and groups that wish to discuss the challenges faced by their departments and programs. To arrange a meeting, contact the conference coordinator: Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu.

Presenters are invited to submit their work for review for publication in the 2015 edition of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/index

The cost of the conference is $300 for Friday and Saturday, and $150 for Saturday only, inclusive of meals.

For more information about “Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Cultures,” including a look at the full program, visit our website or contact Paul Pasquaretta, coordinator of the Quinnipiac University Research and Writing Institute, at 203-582-8509; paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu.


2014 NCPTW/IWCA Joint Conference

Location: Orlando, Florida
Date: October 30, 2014 to November 1, 2014
URL: http://iwcancptw2014.com.
Description:

With my conference co-chair Brian Fallon, I am pleased to announce the 2014 joint conference of the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing and the International Writing Center Association. Our conference will take place from Thursday October 30th to Saturday November 1st at Disney's Coronado Springs Hotel Resort at the Walt Disney World Resort.  

Our keynote speaker will be Beth Boquet, author of  such works as "Our Little Secret: A History of Writing Centers, Pre- to Post- Open Admissions" and  Noise From the Writing Center, as well as co-author of The Everyday Writing Center: A Community of Practice.

You can find the CFP at http://iwcancptw2014.com/. Please direct any questions to the conference email address, iwcancptw2014@gmail.com

Melissa Ianetta


12th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Date: June 12, 2014 to June 14, 2014
URL: http://www.cce.umn.edu/iwac2014.
Description:
  “Shifting Currents / Making Waves”
12th IWAC Conference: June 12-14, 2014
Call for Proposals 
 
Submission begins: August 1, 2013
Submission deadline: November 4, 2013
Conference website: http://www.cce.umn.edu/iwac2014
 
“Literacy today is in the middle of a tectonic change… [T]hese are structural changes—global, educational, technological… How is it that what we teach and what we test can be so different from what our students know as writing?”—Kathleen Blake Yancey (2004)
“Situations (contexts) do not just exist...[but] are actively created, sustained, negotiated, resisted, and transformed moment-by-moment through ongoing work.”—James Paul Gee (2000)
The Center for Writing and the Office of Undergraduate Education at the University of Minnesota are delighted to announce a call for proposals for the 12th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference (IWAC), to be held in the Commons Hotel on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, June 12–14, 2014.
Shifting Currents / Making Waves
The conference theme, “Shifting Currents/Making Waves,” references the lively Mississippi River (a few blocks from our on-campus conference hotel), WAC’s history as a progressive pedagogical movement, and its current activity in an era of accelerated change.
Among the shifts and waves we will discuss are those occurring in…
?       disciplinary and interdisciplinary discourse communities and conventions
?       location, focus, and pace of WAC, WID, and CAC programming
?       understanding of literacy development and transferability
?       multimodal reading and writing
?       methods used to access and attribute intellectual content (formerly known as reading and citing)
?       current influence of professional writing upon academic writing and writing instruction
?       global languages and translingualism in the writing-enriched classroom
?       course venues, class sizes, and instructor roles triggered by flipped classrooms, e-learning,
         MOOCs, etc.
?       writing assessment theory and practice
?       approaches to assessing and sustaining WAC, WID, and CAC programming
?       graduate student mentoring and professionalization in WAC
Call for Session Proposals
To facilitate constructive discussion of these and other field-relevant shifts, we will encourage innovative formatting in concurrent sessions and will extend particular welcome to sessions that include interaction and discussion. We enthusiastically encourage proposals for sessions that include instructors from diverse academic disciplines and international settings. Proposals will require a short, one- or two-sentence description of the presentation along with an abstract. Presenters will select from among the following formats:
Pre-conference workshop (180 minutes)
Proposals for these Thursday morning sessions will include session choreography and a set of participant outcomes. If desired, sessions can be scheduled into wired, active-learning classrooms.
5 X 10 talks 
(10 minutes)
Five slides, ten minutes. This innovative alternative to the poster session provides a venue suited for brief, general-audience talks accompanied by visual props. The 5 X 10 is particularly well-suited for profiling institutional programs or drawing attention to a single issue or innovation. Presented live, 5 X 10s will be also videorecorded for looped airing later at the conference.
Individual presentations 
(20 minutes)
Individual presentations will be grouped into three-person panels by shared topic, and a session chair will be assigned. Individual presenters are asked to limit presented segments to 15 minutes in order to allow for substantial discussion at the end of the panel.
Multi-presenter panel or discussion 
(75 minutes)
Proposals for structured discussions (or full panels) will identify sequence of activity, opportunities for interaction, session timing, and a session chair. Possibilities here include point-counterpoint discussions, choreographed roundtables, fishbowl discussions, and intentionally sequenced panels.
Teaching demonstrations (20 minutes)
Brief, interactive demonstrations of writing instruction from any academic discipline. These will be grouped by discipline or strategy, and a session chair will be assigned.
Proposals will be judged against the following criteria:
?       clarity of purpose, content, and design
?       situatedness within WAC theory, research, and practice
?       contribution to and engagement with conference theme
?       potential to foster constructive interaction
?       potential interest to a diverse cross-section of conference attendees
Accommodations and Extracurriculars
The 2014 IWAC will take place at the University of Minnesota at the Commons HotelWe think that this university and the twin cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul are apt places in which to contemplate WAC’s shifting currents and wave-making.
Those who can bear to pull themselves away from sessions will find a variety of Minneapolitan (and St. Paulite) things to see and do. Restaurants, for example: looking beyond hotdishlutefisk, and food on a stick, you’ll find James Beard Award–winning chefs and locally-owned restaurants that advocate and enact sustainable, local food production residing beside eateries that proudly refuse to do so. World-class museums and theatres including the Walker Art Center and Guthrie Theater compete with dozens of local art and performance venues such as the Minnesota Center for Book ArtsJungle Theater, and Intermedia Arts. We also know how to get around: in 2010, Bicycling Magazine voted Minneapolis the country’s most bikeable city, which is not too shabby for a city that endures (celebrates) seven-month long winters. We are also serious about our sports teams. In summer, this means the Minnesota Twins, the Minnesota Lynx, and the St. Paul Saints. Attendees joined by families will appreciate Minneapolis’ many picturesque parks and canoe-friendly lakes, the Science Museum, the Bakken museum (electricity!), the nearby Mill City Museum (flour!), and the Children’s Museum.  And yes, we also have the Mall of America.

WAC SIG at the 2014 Conference on College Composition and Communication

Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, JW Marriott, room 301
Date: March 21, 2014 to March 21, 2014
URL: http://www.ncte.org/cccc/conv.
Description:

Meeting of the International Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum Programs at the Conference on College Composition and Communication

 

This annual meeting is intended to give leaders of new and established WAC/WID programs at any level and in any locale the opportunity to ask questions and share information about any aspect of WAC/WID program development and operation. Having met annually at CCCC since 1981, we have averaged 40-60 attendees each of the past ten years, always about half of these representing new WAC/WID initiatives. The members of the Network's consultants board serve as small-group facilitators during the meeting.


Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education

Location: Maastricht University, Netherlands
Date: April 11, 2013 to April 13, 2013
URL: http://conference.iclhe.org.
Contact: Bob Wilkinson, Conference Chair at info@iclhe.org
Description:

 

Maastricht University, the Netherlands, is pleased to host the third conference in Europe that specifically addresses issues affecting the interface between content and language in higher education: “Integrating content and language in higher education” (ICLHE 2013).
 
In the decade after the implementation of the Bologna Declaration in Europe, with its impacts across the world, the higher education landscape has changed radically, even if we do not always notice it. Universities are increasingly competing for students and staff. They are acutely aware of their relative rankings, and they are critically concerned about the delivery of quality education.
 
In this landscape universities have been offering many programmes at bachelor’s and master’s level in other languages, especially but not only in English. How successful are these programmes? How do students access the content knowledge? How does their language knowledge evolve? How are the staff affected? And the universities as a whole? What has research taught us? These are some of the questions that ICLHE 2013 is designed to address.
 
ICLHE 2013, organized by ExHEM and Maastricht University Language Centre, thus focuses on the integration of disciplinary content learning and language learning affecting universities and other institutes of higher education worldwide. In particular, following on from the previous ICLHE Conferences in 2003 and 2006, it highlights research into issues affecting higher education learning through a foreign language.
 
Conference Themes
 
ICLHE 2013 addresses key themes such as:
  1. policy: how local, regional, national and supra-national policies shape the design and implementation of the integration of content and language in higher education
  2. linguistic strains: the impact of the rise of English-medium instruction on the role of other languages and cultures in the higher education landscape
  3. content: ICL and the access to content knowledge
  4. language: the evolution of language competencies in ICLHE programmes
  5. theory: theoretical frameworks for underpinning the integration of content and language
While priority is given to research-based contributions on these themes, other contributions are also welcome.
 
Keynote speakers: see the conference site: http://conference.iclhe.org
 
Call for contributed papers
 
We invite proposals on the themes of the conference from academic teaching staff and researchers, educationalists, methodologists and ICT specialists, as well as policy and strategic planners, and others with experience and interest in higher education mediated through a second/foreign language. Proposals may take the form of conference papers, posters, workshops or colloquia. See website for further details and proposal form.
 
The deadline for proposals is extended to November 1, 2012.
 
The official language of the conference is English. Proposals (and contributions) are welcome in other languages (German, French, Spanish, Italian). 
 
Pre-conference workshops will be scheduled on Wednesday 10 April 2013.
 
For further information please contact:
 
Bob Wilkinson, Conference Chair
Mr. René de la Fonteijne, Conference Manager
 
T +31 (0) 43 388 2751
F +31(0) 43 388 4956
e-mail info@iclhe.org
 
ICLHE Association
 
The conference will also see the formal inauguration of the ICLHE Association, with its founding General Assembly and voting for the officers of the Association.
Who should attend
The conference is aimed at educators and others in higher education who are interested or engaged in
the design, delivery and evaluation of academic programmes given wholly or partly through the medium
of a second language.

Meeting of the International Network of Writing-Across-the-Curriculum Programs

Location: Conference on College Composition and Communication, Las Vegas, Nevada
Date: March 15, 2013 to March 15, 2013
URL: http://www.ncte.org/cccc/conv.
Contact: Chris Thaiss at cjthaiss@ucdavis.edu
Description:

This will be the 33rd annual SIG meeting of the International (formerly National) Network of Writing-across-the-Curriculum (WAC) Programs at CCCC. Since 1981, this CCCC SIG has offered a unique opportunity for those who lead WAC/WID efforts at schools, colleges, and universities or those who wish to begin or re-start such initiatives. Aside from a few announcements of upcoming events of interest at the beginning of the session, the SIG meeting takes place in small discussion groups facilitated by members of the Network Consultants Board (highly-experienced program leaders). These groups address questions and concerns of the participants in regard to any aspect of the development and sustaining of WAC/WID initiatives and programs. In addition, occasional discussion groups in recent years have considered such topics as a member-endorsed Statement of Principles for WAC/WID Programs.

Over the past ten years, this SIG has consistently drawn 40, 50, or more participants to its 6:30 PM Friday slot. Since the SIG was renamed "International" in 2005, approximately one third of attendees each year have come from institutions outside the U.S. Moreover, attending the SIG serves as an important step for those just beginning initiatives at their institutions, with approximately one half of participants each year self-identifying in this role.

The names listed as participants, in addition to the chair, are the members of the Board who will lead the discussion groups. They are listed as "respondents," not "speakers," because they will respond to topics brought up in discussion.

 

Participant(s): 
Location:  Riviera Hotel, Capri 116, First Floor
Time:  Friday 3/15 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

 


QUWAC Fall 2012 Conference - New Vistas: WAC/WID Intersections in the 21st Century

Location: Hamden, CT
Date: November 16, 2012 to November 17, 2012
URL: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/prebuilt/pdf/institutes/wac/n ....
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.edu
Description:

Our fourth biennial conference on critical thinking and writing will be framed around the effects WAC and WID programs have upon the teaching of critical thinking and writing in first-year composition, general education cores, and major programs of study. In focusing on these effects, we hope to create a forum to consider two related questions: If the responsibility for critical thinking and writing is no longer located solely in English and Composition and Rhetoric departments, where does the work of writing specialists and disciplinary faculty meet? Where and how might we work together in ways that support the global aims of undergraduate education and stronger learning outcomes in the majors?

Deadline for registration is Friday, November 9th, at 5pm. For more information about New Vistas, contact Paul Pasquaretta, Director of the Quinnipiac University Research and Writing Institute, at 203-582-8509, or Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.

The schedule of presentations is available at http://www.quinnipiac.edu/prebuilt/pdf/institutes/wac/WAC2012NewVistasProgram.pdf

Our keynote speaker, Barbara Walvoord, has generously offered to meet with individuals and small groups on Saturday, November 17th. To schedule a meeting, contact Paul Pasquaretta, Research and Writing Center Director, at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu,; 203-582-8509. Appointments will be made on a first come first served basis.

The cost of the conference is $300 for Friday and Saturday; $150 for Saturday only. Friday includes a wine and cheese reception, formal dinner, and presentation. Registration is online: https://www.applyweb.com/public/register?s=quinwrit

For all other queries, including information about travel and hotel accommodations, visit the QUWAC Conference website: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes-and-centers/writing-across-the-curriculum/conference

Update: The QUWAC and RWI Announce Friday Night Program

“Writing and the Visual Contact Zone: A Conversation with Khanlar Gasimov, Sculptor and Artist”

Following the meeting of NEWACC (Northeast Writing Across the Curriculum Consortium) from 2pm-5pm, New Vistas will host a reception and art show featuring works by Khanlar Gasimov, an Azerbaijani sculptor and artist working in the United States and Europe. His work, which combines the visual arts with writing, the spoken word and performance, is well suited to the New Vistas theme, which reflects the desire to see not only new things, but familiar things in a new light. A conversation with the artist and his work will be featured at the conclusion of the formal dinner, which begins at 7pm. “We feel extremely fortunate to have Gasimov participate in this event,” says Paul Pasquaretta, the Research and Writing Institute director. “Our visitors will enjoy the opportunity to reflect on their work from a different, if not transformative, perspective.”

New Vistas will resume Saturday morning with a keynote address from Barbara Walvoord, whose ground-breaking work as a teacher, scholar, consultant, and program director, has made her one of the leading figures in WAC/WID. Walvoord will be available throughout the day to meet with individuals and small groups who wish to discuss with her the particular challenges faced by their departments and programs. To arrange a meeting, contact Paul Pasquaretta at 203-582-8509 


Fourth International Writing and Critical Thinking Conference: New Vistas: WAC/WID Intersections in the 21st Century

Location: Quinnipiac University, Mount Carmel Campus
Date: November 16, 2012 to November 17, 2012
URL: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes-and-centers/writin ....
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta at Paul.Pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu
Description:

Quinnipiac University's fourth biennial international conference on critical thinking and writing will be framed around the effects WAC and WID programs have upon the teaching of critical thinking and writing in major programs of study, general education cores, and first-year composition. To advance a collaborative dialogue about writing across and within the disciplines, we invite disciplinary faculty and writing specialists to share their experience engaging WAC and WID programs and strategies. In addition to investigating theoretical concerns, presenters are encouraged to provide practical, research-based techniques and strategies that promote critical thinking and writing in a variety of contexts across the spectrum of liberal arts and sciences, business, health sciences, communications, and education. In focusing on these effects, organizers hope to create a forum to consider several related questions:

Presenters will be invited to submit their papers for review for publication in the inaugural edition of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/index

Keynote speaker: Barbara Walvoord, professor emerita, Notre Dame University

Walvoord has consulted or led workshops at more than 350 institutions of higher education throughout the U.S. on WAC, WID, assessment, teaching, and learning.

Deadline for Proposals: June 29, 2012

Send your 250-300 word abstract to Paul Pasquaretta, Director the Research and Writing Institute:paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu. We welcome both individual proposals and panel proposals. Individual papers/presentations will be held to 20 minutes in length; panels will be held to 90 minutes total, with time left at the end of every session for questions.

Registration and Housing

The registration fee for the full conference (Friday and Saturday) is $300 and includes receptions, dinner, and all meals; keynote address, and all presentations. The cost for Saturday only is $150.

Rooms are available at the Clarion Hotel and Suites on Whitney Avenue in Hamden for a conference rate of $109/night. Frequent shuttle service will be provided from the hotel to the conference site at no extra charge. For reservations, call the Clarion directly at 203-288-3831; or email Falisha Smith at fsmith@Clarion-Hamden.com.

For more information about New Vistas, contact Paul Pasquaretta, director of the Quinnipiac University Research and Writing Institute, at 203-582-8509, or paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu.


2012 IWCA Conference

Location: San Diego, CA
Date: October 25, 2012 to October 27, 2012
URL: http://www.socalwritingcenters.org/iwca2012/index.html..
Description:

The SoCal Writing Centers Association invites you to attend the 2012 IWCA Conference in San Diego, October 25-27, 2012. We are now accepting proposals: the call appears below.

Like lines drawn in the sand, Writing Center work is continuously recast by ever-changing policies in higher education, innovations in technology, outsourced alternatives to student services, increased diversity of student populations, and progressions in writing center praxis. With the tides, we must be willing to shift within our philosophies and our policies in order to best support the communities with whom we work.

For our 2012 International Writing Centers Association conference in San Diego, we invite you to consider the centers where you work and write: What lines do you draw? How do those lines shift? How do shifting lines provide a chance for new definitions of yourselves and your work? How do the disappearing lines of work that you thought finished reappear as issues you must revisit and re-vision? How can the writing center community adapt to the tide so that it is second nature for us to live with the shifting sands? And how do we encourage others within our institutions to shore up student writing for/in the 21st century?

The deadline for proposal submission is April 23, 2012. For more information, visit http://www.socalwritingcenters.org/iwca2012/index.html.

 


11th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

Location: Savannah, GA
Date: June 7, 2012 to June 9, 2012
URL: http://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/conted/conferences.html.
Contact: Randall McClure at randallmcclure@georgisouthern.edu
Description:

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

 

"The Future is WAC"

The 11th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

June 7-9, 2012

Savannah, GA

Hosted by The Department of Writing and Linguistics and the Division of Continuing Education

Georgia Southern University

 

The Department of Writing and Linguistics in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences and the Division of Continuing Education at Georgia Southern University are proud to announce the call for proposals for the 11th International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference to be held in the Coastal Georgia Center in the Historic District of Savannah, Georgia on June 7-9, 2012.

 

The Future is WAC

In recent years, we have seen many changes in our institutions, from the increasing importance of digital communication technologies to challenging economic climates and changing demographics. "The Future is WAC" will focus on the ways in which WAC programs and professionals may need to expand their efforts in response to these challenges and how these initiatives can lead the way for our institutions to be self-sustaining and proactive in meeting the changing needs of our students and the communities of which we are a part. It will welcome presentations, interactive workshops, and posters that explore the ways in which WAC has been sustained and enhanced its presence in K-12 schools, colleges and universities, and around the globe. We hope that the conference will include multiple voices and a variety of perspectives on WAC today. 

Call for Proposals

Each concurrent session at WAC 2012 lasts 75 minutes, allowing 60 minutes for presentations and 15 minutes for discussion. Conference chairs Randall McClure, Michael Pemberton, and Janice Walker welcome proposals for engaging, interactive

In addition to proposals for presentations, panels, and workshops that respond to the conference theme, topics may include the following: administration, assessment, curriculum, economics, faculty development, history of WAC, interdisciplinary collaboration, student learning, politics, research, school/college collaboration, sustainability, teaching, technology, theory, writing, and other forms of communicating across the disciplines. We particularly encourage collaborative projects among contributors from varied disciplines.

 

Individual presentations will be grouped by shared topic, and a session chair will be assigned; all multi-presenter proposals should identify a session chair among the presenters. Proposals will require a short, one- or two-sentence description of the presentation along with a 250-word abstract (and another 250-word abstract of the entire session in the case of panels) and may be edited until the deadline date of November 1, 2011.

 

To Submit Proposals & For More Information

Proposals must be submitted via the conference website. Details on the conference and the website will be available soon. Please check http://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/conted/conferences.html for updates.

For more information, contact Randall McClure at randallmcclure@georgiasouthern.edu


Writing in the Disciplines Symposium

Location: Quinnipiac University
Date: March 3, 2012 to March 3, 2012
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Description:

 

On Saturday, March 3rd, the Research and Writing Institute at Quinnipiac University will host a writing in the disciplines symposium. The event will feature WID case studies from the Yale University Writing Center, Southern 
Connecticut State University Writing Across the Curriculum committee, University of Connecticut Writing Center, 
and Quinnipiac University Writing Across the Curriculum committee. The keynote speaker will be Neal Lerner, Directorof the Writing Center at Northeastern University. WID workshops will be hosted by the co-presenting schools. Theevent is sponsored by a Davis Educational Foundation grant. For more information and event registration contact the RWI director at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu or 203-582-8509.

 


2011 Spilman Symposium on Issues in Teaching Writing

Location: Virginia Military Institute in Lexington
Date: October 1, 2011 to October 1, 2011
URL: http://www.vmi.edu/iwp.
Contact: Christina McDonald at mcdonaldcr@vmi.edu
Description:

I hope you’ll join us for the 14th Spilman Symposium on Issues in Teaching Writing to be held at Virginia Military Institute in Lexington on Saturday, October 1, 2011.

Presentations by Sondra Perl (City University of New York), Kathleen Blake Yancey (Florida State University), and Doug Hesse (University of Denver) will provide a foundation for discussions of this year’s theme, The Reflective Learner: Exploring Multimodal Assignments and ePortfolios in Teaching Writing. We’ll explore different kinds of reflection—how to recognize, invite, and respond to it from our students. We’ll think about how reflective learning might be facilitated by multimodal assignments and ePortfolios. What theoretical, pedagogical, and practical concerns inform and shape our choices of assignment and modes of response? And more. The topic provides an ideal opportunity to bring together again our regular group of college writing instructors, faculty from across the disciplines who are committed to writing as a way of learning and of expressing knowledge, and a growing audience of high school teachers.

The Spilman Symposium is a one-day, annual event created to bring teachers of writing together for conversations with some of the major scholars in rhetoric and composition studies. Providing a forum for active engagement of timely issues, the symposium is designed as a think-tank for all faculty who are interested in the teaching of writing, including those involved with writing across the curriculum. Participation is limited to the first 80 registrants. Registration is $40, which includes lunch, and forms are available on-line at www.vmi.edu/iwp. The deadline for registration is September 19.

I hope you’ll join us and share this announcement with others who might like to participate. If you have questions, please contact me by e-mail mcdonaldcr@vmi.edu or by phone 540-464-7240.


EATAW 2011

Location: Limerick, Ireland
Date: June 29, 2011 to July 1, 2011
Description:

Call for Proposals

EATAW 2011

The Role of the Student Experience in Shaping Academic Writing Development in Higher Education

Wednesday 29th June to Friday 1st July 2011

The University of Limerick (UL), Limerick, Ireland

Hosted by the Regional Writing Centre in conjunction with the Centre for Teaching and Learning, UL

Deadline for submission of proposals: January 10th, 2011

The European Association for the Teaching of Academic Writing (EATAW) is pleased to
announce the Call for Proposals for its 6th biennial conference. EATAW is a scholarly forum
which seeks to bring together those involved or interested in the teaching, tutoring, research,
administration and development of academic writing in higher education in Europe. EATAW
membership is free and open to individuals from all over the world.

The 2011 EATAW conference invites all those interested in academic writing development in
higher education to contribute to the discussion on enhancing the quality of the student
experience through writing. Enhancing the student experience is central to the vision and
mission of most higher-education institutions in Europe and beyond. How both undergraduate
and postgraduate students experience academic writing has a major impact on the students’
participation in academic and disciplinary environments and on the development of their
identity. Writing programmes and initiatives that actively engage students in the practices of
their academic communities can enhance the quality of the student learning experience.
We invite teachers of academic writing, staff and administrators of writing centres and writing
programmes, academic-writing researchers, and administrators and politicians in the field of
higher education to attend the conference. The conference is open to anyone who has a
professional interest in the role of the student experience in shaping academic writing
development in higher education.

Call for Proposals

Contributions addressing writing developments which attempt to respond to the student
experience will be welcome. The conference will be a place to reflect on practices that aim to
enhance the learning experience of both undergraduate and postgraduate student writers
across and within the disciplines (for example, Writing Across the Curriculum and Writing in
Disciplines initiatives). Such reflections may also extend to programmes which aim to
enhance staff/academics’ writing development as a means of supporting student writing
development.



WAC Institute for Community Colleges

Location: MCC-Longview Community College, Lee's Summit, MO
Date: June 22, 2011 to June 24, 2011
URL: http://wacblog2010.blogspot.com/p/wac-institute-for-com ....
Contact: Mary McMullen-Light at Mary.McMullen-Light@mcckc.edu
Description:

SAVE THE DATES and PLAN TO JOIN US!

WAC Institute for Community Colleges 2011

"Creating a Culture of Writing:  What Works"

On June 22-24, 2011, MCC-Longview will host a Writing Across the Curriculum Institute for Community Colleges, a focused, collegial opportunity for community college WAC directors, discipline faculty, and administrators to learn practical strategies for starting and sustaining a WAC program in a community college or two-year college setting.

The institute offers two threads, one for those seeking to design or launch a WAC program and another for those who have established a program and want to keep it energized and plan for its continued growth.

This highly interactive gathering of community college personnel includes panels of experienced faculty and administrators discussing issues critical to WAC and provides a mix of plenary, workshop, and discussion sessions on these topics:

Who should attend? WAC directors, instructors from any discipline, administrators.  Colleges are encouraged to send teams of two or more.

Where will the institute be held? On Longview's campus in Lee's Summit, MO, a suburb in the Kansas City metro area with convenient lodging and amenities available near campus.  Lodging is available at the Lee's Summit Hampton Inn at a conference rate of $89  per night plus tax.

When? The institute will run from 9:00AM, Wednesday, June 22, through noon on Friday, June 24.

Registration:  Early registration fee is $250 per person.   Fee for each additional person from the same institution is $225.  After March 15, registration fee is $300. (Note:  NEW EARLY REGISTRATION DATE: MARCH 15!)

Fee includes participation in all sessions, conference materials, 3 continental breakfasts, two lunches, and light refreshments.  Cancellations must be made in writing prior to May 1 to be eligible for a refund (less a $30 administrative fee).

Click here for Registration Form.

Check our blog, The Lake Effect: A WAC Blog for additional information on registration, fees, and details on travel and lodging as they become available.

Signal interest or ask questions:  Mary.McMullen-Light@mcckc.edu.


National Symposium on Assessment in the Humanities

Location: Oxford, Ohio
Date: February 23, 2011 to February 24, 2011
URL: http://www.muohio.edu/aihc/.
Description:

I am writing to invite you to attend what we believe to be the first National Symposium on Assessment in the Humanities, which will be held at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, on February 23 and 24. Registration is $40 per day, a miniscule amount for a conference of enormous value.
 
The nine featured speakers include Carol Geary Schneider, President of the American Association of Colleges and Universities; Gerry Graff, past president (2008) of the Modern Language Association; and Peggy Maki, a nationally prominent consultant who served as a Senior Scholar and Director of Assessment at the American Association for Higher Education.
 
This conference is sponsored in part by a generous grant from the Teagle Foundation. Teagle Vice President Donna Heiland is one of the featured speakers.
 
WHAT WAC PROGRAMS CAN GAIN
The assessment movement, which has been gaining strength for the past two decades, requires that student learning be assessed by systematically examining student work. As a WPA, you can help your institution address these demands by sharing your expertise in developing efficient, reliable, and valid ways of evaluating student writing in terms of students’ general writing abilities and their mastery of disciplinary genre, conventions, and knowledge.
 
Your help will be especially welcomed when offered to humanities programs, which are the focus of the Symposium. If you are affiliated with an English department, you probably realize that many humanities faculty are apprehensive about the national, state, and institutional imperatives for assessment. They ask how the truly distinctive humanities learning outcomes can be evaluated using the quantitative methods that assessment seems to demand. Attempts to measure these qualitative educational outcomes, they fear, are more likely to eviscerate than to enhance their programs. The Symposium will address these practical and theoretical concerns from the perspective of humanities scholars who advocate assessment. It will also provide you and your institution with new ways of conceptualizing assessment in the humanities.
 
As you know, the humanities are not the only disciplines where faculty face the challenges of assessing student writing. The many professional accrediting agencies (e.g., AACSB, ABET, and NCATE) include communication in writing among the areas of student learning to be assessed. Perspectives and strategies discussed at the Symposium will be useful in your work with faculty in nonhumanities disciplines as well.
 
By supporting academic programs as they address the challenges of assessment, you can broaden understanding of the centrality of your program to institutional mission. The relationships you build can be long lasting. The goal of assessment is to highlight strengths in a program and specific areas in which the programs might be made even better. In most cases, especially in the humanities, the most effective strategies for improvement will be the writing-across-the-curriculum and writing-in-the-disciplines pedagogies you can help faculty understand and implement.
 
MORE INFORMATION
Additional information about the conference, transportation, and lodging is provided at the Symposium website: http://www.muohio.edu/aihc/.
 


Writing Research Across Borders II

Location: Washington, D.C.
Date: February 17, 2011 to February 20, 2011
URL: http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/wrconf11/.
Description:

Writing Research Across Borders II

The program for the international writing research conference Writing Research Across Borders II is now available online at  http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/wrconf11/   The program features over 600 presenters from 38 countries.  The early registration deadline is November 30th.  Please note there are discounted rates for early registration and for adjunct faculty and K-12 educators.  Information regarding travel and hotels is also available at the conference website.  If you have any questions please contact us at writing@education.ucsb.edu

Conference Co-chairs
Charles Bazerman
Paul Rogers

Conference Steering Committee
Christopher Dean
Karen Lunsford
Suzie Null
Amanda Stansell
Terry Myers Zawacki


Middle East - North Africa Writing Centers Alliance 2011 Conference

Location: Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
Date: February 17, 2011 to February 18, 2011
URL: http://www.aus.edu/conferences/wca2011/.
Contact: Lynne Ronesi at LRONESI@aus.edu
Description:

Theme: Situating, Sustaining, and Serving

MENA Writing Centers are maturing and regional conversation is shifting from starting up to quality service, situating ourselves as a key academic component on campus and sustaining an excellent level of support to student writers.

Conference Dates: February 17-18, 2011

Abstract Submission Deadline: December 1, 2010 (extended)

Call for Proposals: http://www.aus.edu/conferences/wca2011/proposals.php


Writing Research Across Borders II

Location: George Mason University, Washington, DC
Date: February 17, 2011 to February 20, 2011
Contact: Charles Bazerman or Karen Lunsford at bazerman@education.ucsb.edu;klunsford@writing.ucsb.edu
Description:

Call for Proposals: Writing Research Across Borders II 
 
George Mason University 
 
February 17-20, 2011 
 
Proposal Deadline May 3, 2010 
 
As societies become more knowledge-intensive and communication technologies draw us more closely together, the importance of writing in economic, scientific, civic, personal, and social development becomes more apparent. Correspondingly, the imperative to conduct research on writing in schools and the workplace, in relationship to learning and development, and in all aspects of our lives has invigorated work among scholars in all regions of the world. The conference Writing Research across Borders II will provide an opportunity for researchers to share their findings and set research agend as for the coming years. 
 
Continuing the success of the three previous international research conferences held at the University of California, Santa Barbara, the 2011 Writing Research Across Borders II will be held at George Mason University in the Washington D.C./Northern Virginia area. We invite proposals that will continue to deepen the cross-disciplinary, international dialogues across the many different domains of writing research. 
 
As in past years, this conference will focus on writing development across the lifespan, including the impact of new technologies on learning to write, early acquisition of writing, writing across grade levels (K-20), writing in the disciplines and professions, and writing in the workplace or other community and institutional settings. We invite proposals presenting research in these areas. We also invite proposals on any other areas of writing use and practice, such as writing in progressive or large scale educational programs, or proposals that link writing research and policies. We welcome papers raising methodological issues about researching writing. We invite work from any research tradition that is grounded in the tradition’s previous research and pursues the methodical gathering of qualitative or quantitative data appropriate to its claims. 
 
Proposals should identify the format preferred (panels, roundtables, individual presentations, and poster presentations). Individual or poster proposals should be a maximum of 500 words. Proposals with multiple presentations (panel20and roundtable) should contain a short overview statement and then no more than 400 words per speaker. Proposals should specify the relevant research literatures, research questions, methods, data, and findings, as well as the scope and duration of the research projects. 
 
The deadline for proposals is May 3, 2010. Please submit proposals in .doc or .rtf format by email attachment to <writing@education.ucsb.edu>. Also, be sure to include a title for your proposal and each speaker’s individual talk, as well as contact information for each individual presenter. 
 

Professor Charles Bazerman 
Department of Education 
Gevirtz Graduate School of Education 
University of California, Santa Barbara 
Santa Barbara, CA 93106 
phone: 805-893-7543 
bazerman@education.ucsb.edu 
http://www.education.ucsb.edu/bazerman 
 
--Karen Lunsford, Assistant Professor of Writing 
Mailing address: 
Writing Program, South Hall 1520 
University of California, Santa Barbara 
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3010 
klunsford@writing.ucsb.edu 
http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/faculty/lunsford/ 
805-893-8556 


Crossing the Great Divide: Critical Thinking and Writing in the Majors Third Biennial International Conference

Location: Quinnipiac University, Hamden CT
Date: November 19, 2010 to November 20, 2010
URL: http://www.quinnipiac/edu/wac.
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Description:

Quinnipiac University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Presents Crossing the Great Divide: Critical Thinking and Writing in the Majors Third Biennial International Conference Friday, November 19th and Saturday, November 20, 2010 Quinnipiac University, Hamden CT.

This multi-disciplinary conference is framed around the linkages between critical thinking, usually associated with general education, and thinking within the majors—the disciplinary thinking students must master before they graduate. We are calling this move from general education to major study “crossing the great divide” because students often find that what they are asked to master in their major differs in focus and complexity from the critical thinking pedagogies that most general education curricula require of undergraduates. Because thinking and writing are not separable, but instead mutually contain and continuously stretch our teaching and student’s learning, the 2010 conference will explore the dynamic possibilities of assessing, promoting, and measuring writing and thinking across the great general education/major divide. In addition to addressing this large question, conference presenters will provide practical, researched-based techniques and strategies that promote critical thinking and writing in a variety of contexts across the spectrum of liberal arts and sciences. 
 
For additional information, visit our website: www.quinnipiac/edu/wac; or, contact Paul Pasquaretta, Coordinator of the Quinnipiac University Research and Writing Institute, at 203-582-8509, or via email at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu

2011 ECWCA Conference

Location: Kalamazoo, MI
Date: October 25, 2010 to October 25, 2010
URL: http://www.ecwca.org.
Description:
2011 EAST CENTRAL WRITING CENTERS ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE
CENTERING ASSESSMENT:  ROLES, RELATIONSHIPS, RESPECT, RESISTANCE

Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI     March 3 – 5

Assessment has always functioned at the heart of writing center consultations in university, community college, secondary, elementary, and professional settings as consultant and writer collaborate to assess the writer’s needs and focus conversation.  But the passage of No Child Left Behind has changed the definition and tenor of assessment in educational settings for many.  Today assessment experts, writing assessment specialists, politicians, educational administrators, accreditation officers, and others debate what can count and cannot count as valid assessment and what assessment should be used to achieve and cannot be used to achieve.  In the midst of current, often contentious, yet often cooperative debate about educational assessment, the 2011 East Central Writing Centers Association Conference will focus on assessment issues as they relate to writing center work. Those wishing to submit proposals may consider numerous questions, including the following examples:

What roles does or should assessment play in writing centers?
  How do consultants at different centers believe they engage in assessment, if they perceive assessment as one of their roles? What do consultants call the process of determining what to discuss in a  consultation if they don’t consider that process an assessment? How does or should assessment occur in consultations? What role do students have or should they have in writing center assessment? How might assessment differ in different writing center settings, with different writers, or with different consultants? What do we know about the historical roles of assessment in writing centers? What assessment relationships function in writing centers?  What should assessment relationships look like between consultants and directors, consultants and writers, directors and institutional decision makers (deans, principals, institutional self study committees, WPAs, etc.)? Might assessment debates or acquiescence to institutional assessment impact  the reputation of writing center work among students and others? How do writing center consultants and directors assure respect for the integrity of writing center work when others at their institutions are in charge of assessment plans?  Can assessment that speaks to multiple audiences help writing centers gain respect? What happens to writing centers or writing center staff who resist assessment plans they find invalid?  How might staff members best resist assessments they find invalid or simplifying of our work and why should they or should they not do so?  What has resistance to assessment cost writing centers and our field? When should writing centers engage in or resist assessment? When and how should writing center consultants and others contribute to larger discussions of institutional, educational and/or writing assessment?  Who might collaborate with us in such discussion and who might we view with caution? What, if anything, should be the role/s of the International Writing Centers Association or the East Central Writing Centers Association (or any regional or state association) in writing center assessment debates?
 
 
As the first regional conference devoted to assessment of our work, we seek to center writing center assessment discussion, in several connotations of the verb.  Through quality panel discussions, round tables, workshops, and poster sessions we hope conference participants will focus, equalize, highlight, and pinpoint writing center assessment theory, practices, issues, and ideas.
 
 
We encourage proposals to support the conference conversation on assessment of and in writing centers; however, we also encourage proposals that do not relate to the conference theme.

 
Conference Proposal Deadline:  Dec. 13, 2010         Acceptance Notification by Jan 10, 2011

Questions?
Check the ECWCA website: http://www.ecwca.org/, email eastcentralwritingcenters2011@gmail.com, or contact the Western Michigan University Writing Center at 269.387.4615.

Academic Writing and Beyond in Multicultural Societies

Location: Tel Aviv, Israel
Date: July 28, 2010 to July 29, 2010
URL: http://web.mac.com/michael_dickel/iWeb/IFAWConf.html.
Contact: Trudy Zukermann at trudy@vms.huji.ac.il
Description:

Rationale

Tel Aviv BuildingsAt the end of the first decade of the 21st century, more and more educators have come to realize the importance of academic writing programs both in and beyond academia. The view that those entering higher education are able to cope with their writing tasks without guidance has been widely challenged. The need for quality writing ability after leaving higher education is clear. Beyond the academy, with globalization in today’s worlds of business, research, and culture, writing skills are a necessity for all who wish to advance professionally. Especially in multicultural societies where students come from many different cultural and linguistic traditions and are often expected to write in more than one language, supporting student writers at all levels of study and preparing them for writing after their studies are pedagogical imperatives.

Two years ago, the Israel Forum for Academic Writing held its first meeting at Tel Aviv University. Its purpose was to connect people engaged in the teaching and research of academic writing in Israel. Instructors in academic writing in Hebrew and English from colleges and universities throughout the country attended this meeting. Since then, our organization has grown – we now have over 150 members on our mailing list. Visitors from abroad as well as local members have addressed issues such as responding to and assessing student writing, the use of technology in the teaching of writing, and how to gain administrative support for our programs. We have been fortunate in finding a home and support for our organization through the MOFET Institute.

In keeping with the intercultural and multi-linguistic nature of today’s societies, invited speakers at the first international conference on academic writing in Israel will address current issues in first language, second (third, fourth, etc.) language and foreign language writing. We are also planning to present a panel of writers in English, Hebrew, Arabic, and perhaps other languages on the topic, “Universals and Specifics of Academic Writing across Languages”. Participants will address the question of what it means to write in their various languages. Parallel sessions will include individual presentations, round table discussions, and workshops.

The program is designed to engage all those interested in academic writing programs and the writers they educate. Keynote and plenary sessions will be delivered in English. Papers and small group presentations may be given in Hebrew, English, or Arabic. Research-based contributions, as well as practical approaches to the teaching and learning of academic and professional writing are welcome.

Keynote speakers

Deborah HoldsteinDeborah H. Holdstein, PhD
Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Columbia College Chicago
Editor, College Composition and Communication

Dr. Holdstein has published widely in such areas as film, literary studies, and rhetoric and composition; until December, 2009, she continues her term as Editor of the premier journal in rhetoric and composition, College Composition and Communication. As Editor, she is also an Officer of the international organization, the Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Before her arrival at Columbia, Holdstein served as a member of the graduate faculty at Northern Illinois University, where she was Chair of the PhD-granting Department of English. For twenty years, Holdstein taught and advised graduate and undergraduate students at Governors State University, where she also led the program in English, chaired the Graduate Council, and served as Faculty Associate for Graduate Studies and Research in the Office of the Provost. From 1997-2000, she also led GSU's university-wide North Central Association re-accreditation effort.

Dr. Holdstein's books include On Composition and Computers; Rhetorical Choices (with Charles Schuster and Keith Gilyard); The Prentice-Hall Anthology of Women Writers; and her most recent volume, Judaic Perspectives in Rhetoric and Composition (edited with Andrea Greenbaum). Deborah Holdstein also serves as a consultant to colleges and universities (and directs the Consultant-Evaluator Program of the Council of Writing Program Administrators), and is a regular speaker at major scholarly conferences.

 

 

Chris AnsonChristopher M. Anson, Ph.D.
University Distinguished Professor of English; Director, Campus Writing and Speaking Program; North Carolina State University

An avid writer, Chris has published 15 books and over 90 journal articles and book chapters and is on the editorial or reader's boards of ten journals, including CCC, CE, RTE, Across the Disciplines, Written Communication, Assessing Writing, and The Journal of Writing Assessment. He has recently co-authored a new book on digital literacies, Teaching Writing Using Blogs, Wikis, and other Digital Tools (Christopher-Gordon Publishers, 2009).

Chris has given over 425 conference papers, keynote addresses, and invited lectures and faculty workshops across the U.S. and in 21 foreign countries.

Chris served as President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators from 2002-2005 and spent seven additional years on the WPA Executive Board. He has also served on the CCCC Executive Committee (1993-96), the CCCC Outstanding Book Award Committee (2008-9), the CCCC Resolutions Committee (2002 and 2005), the CCC Editor Search Committee (2003-4), the CCCC Committee on Professional Standards (1990-93, co-chair 1993), the CCCC Committee on Issues in the Profession (2004-present), the CCCC Nominating Committee (1988 and again as chair in 1999), the CCCC Exemplar Award Committee (1996), the NCTE/CEE Nominating Committee (1987), the NCTE Committee on Language Across the Curriculum (1988-91), and the NCTE Board of Directors (1985-99). He chaired the NCTE Assembly for Research in 1992-3 and was program co-chair of the NCTE Global Conference on Language and Literacy (2000, Utrecht, Netherlands) and the Sixth Conference of the National Testing Network in Writing (1987). He chaired the WPA Task Force on Plagiarism and the WPA Task Force on Internationalization. He formed and chaired the MMLA's WAC Section (1989-1994).

 

Otto KruseOtto Kruse, Ph.D.
Director of ZHAW Center for Professional Writing at Zurich University of Applied Sciences, School of Applied Linguistics; Board Member of European Association of Teachers of Academic Writing

More detailed information to come.

 

 


Old Yaffo

Important Dates

Deadline for submission of abstracts

January 15, 2010


Notification of accepted abstracts

March 1, 2010

 

Conference

July 28-29, 2010


WPA 2010

Location: Philadelphia
Date: July 11, 2010 to February 18, 2010
URL: http://www.drexel.edu/wpa2010/.
Contact: Eli Goldblatt, at eligold@temple.edu
Description:

Call for Proposals

WPA 2010: Conversations Toward Action

In the midst of busy everyday lives, sometimes it’s hard to find a quiet place to contemplate with friends our directions and opportunities. CWPA is eager to welcome the voices of people who participate in "writing program administration" writ large and who engage in myriad ways in the work associated with it. This could include work with writing centers; multiple sections or instructors of writing courses; work with community writing programs; course and program assessment; considering how to effectively make connections with others in the classroom, on campus, and beyond; or any other work that is related to writing instruction or program direction.

We invite four types of proposals to foster conversation that will bring together the multiple and varied voices of those with an interest in developing and directing writing programs. These voices include writing instructors (part- or full-time, graduate or lecturer, tenure-track or tenured); 2- and 4-year instructors; department chairs; writing center directors; institutional researchers; teaching and learning center directors, and others. These are described in sections 1, 2, 3, and 4 below under "Proposal Types." Please review the information here about the different session types, then proceed to the Instructions for Submitting Your Proposal to WPA 2010 to submit one or more proposals.

Final proposals are due no later than Wednesday, April 21.
Submit by Wednesday, March 24 for expedited review.

Proposal Types

1. 6-minute individual presentations: Conversation Starters

6-minute presentations are opportunities to share information, questions, and/or ideas quickly, then to facilitate vigorous and lively dialogue among session attendees.

These very short presentations should include three elements: 

  • a discussion point(s) (e.g., a question or two, an intriguing new direction; possibilities for unexpected partnerships;
  • evidence for the discussion point(s); and
  • and conversation starters for session attendees that will help them consider actions based on the conversation.

The focus in the session is on short presentations and lots of talk among participants.

Proposals should include a very brief (150 word or fewer) description that addresses:

  • The question you want to address or point you want to make
  • The evidence on which your question is grounded
  • The questions you’d like participants to take up in conversation.

For instance, a 6-minute presentation could focus around:

  • possibilities for using social networking to connect with communities outside of the university
  • the ways we have incorporated new media into our program's teaching of FY comp
  • an innovative assessment or pedagogy in my class or program

2. 10-minute individual presentations: Extended discussions

10-minute presentations are opportunities to share ongoing research intended to lead to action. Attendees should share a research project with an emphasis on design, evidence/outcomes, and actions based on the research. Presentations should be 10 minutes. We strongly encourage interactive, non-reading presentations.

Proposals (150 words or fewer) should include a description of the focus of the presentation and strategies for engaging attendees in discussion about the presentation’s subject such as questions that will be posed for audience discussion.

For instance, a 10-minute extended discussion could focus around: 

  • A recent study of some element of teaching in your course or program
  • A recent assessment of the program
  • A study of the writing efforts of community organizations in your area
  • A study of writing outreach efforts of your course/program

Proposals would summarize these and include discussion strategies -- for example, posing 2-3 questions for participants to discuss; asking attendees to turn to the person next to them after your presentation/the conclusion of the session to share questions the session raised for them, or other strategies to foster conversation.

3. Full sessions: Panel discussions (75 minutes total)

A full panel can consist of several linked 6-minute presentations (maximum 7 presenters), or fewer linked 10 minute presentations (maximum of 4 presenters). Of the 75 minute session, allocate at least 20 minutes for discussion.

In these sessions, attendees will present very brief subjects for whole-group discussion, including questions related to the subject of the panel discussion.

Proposals should include a (300 word or fewer) description of the panel's focus and strategies for audience participation.

4. Mentoring Project Sessions

In response to the interest generated by the Mentoring Project sessions at the 2009 WPA Conference in Minneapolis, as well as feedback from the Mentoring Project Survey, several sessions at the 2010 WPA Conference in Philadelphia will be devoted to professional development and mentoring issues. To shape the focus of these sessions, though, we need your input! Please complete this to let us know:

  • What mentoring subjects you would like to have included in the 2010 conference
  • Whether you would be willing to serve as a facilitator or presenter for one of these sessions

If you are interested in facilitating or presenting as part of a mentoring project session, you can indicate your willingness to do so via the Mentoring Project CWPA 2010 Conference Survey . You do not need to submit a full proposal to participate in a mentoring project session.

Submitting Your Proposal

If you're ready to submit a proposal, go to the Instructions for Submitting Your Proposal to WPA 2010 .

We look forward to receiving a variety of lively, engaging submissions from a range of participants, and to a fantastic conference!

Questions about proposal formats or WPA 2010 should be directed to Linda Adler-Kassner, conference chair and/or Eli Goldblatt, local chair. Questions about mentoring project sessions should be sent to Joe Janangelo or Sheldon Walcher.


European Writing Centers Association 2010 Conference

Location: American University of Paris
Date: May 24, 2010 to May 28, 2010
Description:

Crossing national boundaries and linguistic borders:

(Re)Thinking and (Re)Situating the Writing Center and WAC connection in Europe and Beyond

 

May 24 – 28, 2010

 

 

Keynote speakers:       Muriel Harris, Purdue University, US

                                                Chris Anson, North Carolina State University, US

Anne-Marie Picard, the American University of Paris, France

 

 

 

This conference will celebrate the EWCAs 12th birthday and our 7th international gathering of a community of scholars, professors, administrators, students, writing center tutors and
professionals
.  We sincerely hope our 2010 conference will offer each of you significant opportunities for shared research and common action across social divides, educational disciplines, languages and cultures.  Central to our conference theme will be to

·        

rethink the connection between writing across the curriculum (WAC) programs and Writing Centers and the  role they play (individually and collectively) in nurturing and advancing the culture of writing in Europe and beyond; what kinds of programs are succeeding in Europe?  What kinds of programs make the most sense for European institutions?  Can the American model be exported to Europe?

 

·         examine the pedagogical, institutional, and political implications of formal writing instruction in European colleges and universities. 

 

We hope this conference will be of interest to people who are concerned with using writing to improve teaching and learning—faculty, administrators, and students from post-secondary institutions, as well as faculty and administrators from secondary schools.

 

The EWCA executive board welcome proposals on topics such as

·         establishing, administering and assessing WAC programs; 

·         theorizing writing instruction in a European context;

·         developing writing centers and training tutors for them in widely different institutional settings;

·         the mutual challenge of writing research and the teaching of writing:  translating research into classroom practice;

·         the idea of a European Writing Center;

·         writing and the new media;

·         social, cultural, political, historical influences on writing in Europe;

·         faculty development;

·         interdisciplinary collaboration and communication;

·         problems and prospects of the Bologna Convention;

·         creating opportunities for shared research and common action across national, linguistic, and cultural divides;

·         The link  between thinking and writing on European campuses;

·         Theories of academic discourse

 

We particularly encourage collaborative projects among contributors from varied disciplines, nationalities, university writing programs.


Suggested Formats of Presentations:

 

- Individual presentations (20 minutes with 10 minutes Q/A):  You may wish to present work in progress or results.

 

- Workshops (60 minutes)

 

- 60-minute multi-presenter panels

 

- Poster Presentations and Exhibits: You may provide a visual overview of your work (either research or teaching interventions in progress or results) and stimulate individual conversation.  

 

More information about the conference will be available by the end of October on our conference website.

 

Deadline for proposal submissions:          January 10, 2010

Notification of acceptance:                           February 20, 2010

Registration fee:                                               150Euros

                                                                                35 Euros students and Writing Center tutors

                                                                                165Euros late fee, after April 1, 2010

                                                                                70Euros day fee

 

Deadline for registration:                              April 1, 2010

 

Proposed Schedule

 

 

Monday, May 24:              Pre-conference workshop, late afternoon; off campus in the Marais

 

Tuesday, May 25:             Registration:                                      2:00 – 4:00pm (14h – 16h)

                                                Opening Session:                            4:15 – 6:15pm (16h15 – 18h15)

                                                Champagne reception :                 6:30 – 8:00 pm (18h30 – 20h00)

 

Wednesday, May 26 :     concurrent sessions/workshops/panels  9:00 – 5:00 (9h00 – 17h00)

                                                Coffee breaks – mid morning, mid afternoon

                                                Buffet lunch hosted by AUP

                                                Poster presentations

 

                                                Early evening group activity:

Bateau Mouche boat ride on the Seine (1 hour) = approximately 4 Euros                 per participant

 

Thursday, May 27:           concurrent sessions/workshops/panels  9:00 – 5:00 (9h00 – 17h00)

                                                Coffee breaks – mid morning, mid afternoon

                                                Lunch on your own at local cafes or bistros

                                                Poster presentations

 

                                                Evening group activity:

Group Dinner = approximately 45 Euros per participant

 

Friday, May 28:               concurrent sessions/workshops/panels 

                                              Closing session  = 9:00 – 12:00

                                              Wine and Cheese reception = 12:15 – 1:30 (12:15 – 13:30)

 

 


2010 International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

Location: Indiana University, Bloomington
Date: May 20, 2010 to May 22, 2010
URL: http://www.iub.edu/~wac2010.
Description:
Announcing the 2010 Writing Across the Curriculum Conference at Indiana University 
 
The 2010 International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference will be hosted by the Campus Writing Program at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Conference dates are May 20-22, 2010. Deadline for proposal submissions is October 19, 2009. Notification of acceptance will be no later than December 4, 2009. The deadline for conference registration is April 1, 2010 (those registering after this date will be charged a late fee). 
 
This biannual conference, the only U.S. conference dedicated exclusively to writing across the curriculum (WAC) and writing in the disciplines (WID), is typically of interest to people who are concerned with using writing to improve teaching and learning--faculty, administrators, and students from post-secondary institutions, as well as faculty and administrators from secondary schools. 
 
Conference chairs Laura Plummer and Jo Ann Vogt welcome workshops, panels, and individual presentations on topics of true interest and concern; there is no delimiting theme. Potential WAC topics include: administration, assessment, curriculum, economics, faculty development, history of WAC, interdisciplinary collaboration, student learning, politics, research, school/college collaboration, sustainability, teaching, technology, theory, writing, and other forms of communicating across the disciplines. 
 
Bloomington is located about 50 miles south of Indianapolis in the limestone hills of south central Indiana, a region noted for its rustic beauty and artistic traditions. Travel to Bloomington is easy, and lodging in the Indiana University Memorial Union (where the conference is to be held) is affordable and pleasant. 
 
Further information will be available on the conference website, http://www.iub.edu/~wac2010 or by email (wac2010@indiana.edu) or phone (812-855-4928). 
 

2011 Student Success in Writing Conference

Location: Savannah, GA
Date: April 30, 2010 to February 4, 2011
URL: http://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/conted/success.html.
Contact: Randall McClure at randallmcclure@gmail.com
Description:

Student Success in Writing Conference, February 4, 2011, hosted by the Department of Writing and Linguistics and the Division of Continuing Education, Georgia Southern University

Keynote Address: Dr. Michael Pemberton, Georgia Southern University

Conference organizers seek both individual and panel proposals from professional writers and teachers (full-time, adjunct, and teaching assistant) that address any aspect of student success in writing at the high school or college level. Possible topics include the following:

The Student Success in Writing Conference is open to anyone interested in the teaching and learning of writing at the secondary or post-secondary level. The conference also seeks to encourage dialogue between college and high school educators.

Please complete the

online submission form

by November 1, 2010. Questions can be directed to Dr. Nancy Dessommes at

nandess@georgiasouthern.edu

or Dr. Randall McClure at

randallmcclure@georgiasouthern.edu

.


Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Conference 2010

Location: Newark, Delaware
Date: April 9, 2010 to April 10, 2010
URL: http://www.mawcao nline.org/2010/index.html.
Description:

Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Conference 2010

The 2010 MAWCA conference will be hosted by the University of Delaware Writing Center on April 9th – 10th in scenic and historic Newark, Delaware. Our theme of “Individuals Shaping Writing Centers – Writing Centers Shaping Individuals” is sure to make for a creative and illuminating conference experience. We are honored to announce that Dr. Neal Lerner, the Director of Training in Communication Instruction for the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies at MIT, will be our keynote speaker this year. Further, as a new addition to the conference, we’ll be hosting a pre-conference Professional Development Workshop on April 9th. For further information about the conference and the workshop, please visit http://www.mawcao nline.org/2010/index.html or e-mail us at MAWCAconference2010@english.udel.edu.  Proposal submission deadline: January 15th.

Northern California Writing Centers Association Conference 2010

Location: Burlingame, CA
Date: February 6, 2010 to February 6, 2010
URL: http://norcalwca.ning.com/.
Contact: Jennifer Wells at jwells@mercyhsb.com
Description:

Call for Proposals

NCWCA

Northern California Writing Centers Association Conference 2010

Saturday, February 6, 2010

Mercy High School

Burlingame, CA 94010

Co-hosted by Mercy High School and the University of San Francisco

Join our conference Ning: http://norcalwca.ning.com/

 

Conference Theme: The Sustainable Writing Center

 

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Ben Rafoth, Indiana University of Pennsylvania,

Author of A Tutor's Guide: Helping Writers One to One and co-editor of ESL Writers: A Guide for Writing Center Tutors.

 

Description:

            It seems like you can’t walk five feet in Northern California without hearing or seeing the word “sustainable.”  We have been at the epicenter for the “sustainability” movement, sharing our vision for preserving resources we are lucky to have around us for future generations.  However, sustainability doesn’t just apply to our natural resources, but our educational ones as well. For many Northern California writing centers, the current economic climate and ongoing education budget cuts, the changing needs of student populations, including those that historically haven’t been well served by writing centers, and the concerns about our environmental impact have brought a new urgency to discussions of sustainability.

            We invite you to the Northern California Writing Centers Association Conference in 2010, co-sponsored by Mercy High School Burlingame and the University of San Francisco, in order to share what it means to dream, direct, tutor in, or benefit from centers that will continue to flourish for years to come.  We welcome proposals that might address, but certainly are not limited to, the following questions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposal formats include:

 

In addition, NCWCA 2010 will feature a “Poster Potluck” during which all presenters are invited to share a poster (with handouts to share) featuring exciting thing(s) going on in their writing center! Presenters will be able to give their presentation as well as participate in the “Poster Potluck.”

 

 

Proposal Submission: Please submit a description of your proposed presentation/panel/roundtable/workshop as a MS Word or RTF by December 15 to NCWCA2010@gmail.com. Acceptance notices will be sent by January 1. In your proposal, please include:

 

  1. Contact presenter information: Please include name, title, institutional affiliation, phone number, and email address. List names/affiliations for all other presenters.
  2. Description of session (proposal): Please include a description of the topic, its importance and anticipated appeal to participants.  If you are proposing a panel, roundtable or workshop, please describe each presenter’s anticipated contribution.
  3. Audience Involvement: Please describe how your presentation will engage the audience, i.e. we are not looking for people to merely read a paper but to truly present information in a way that involves the audience to some degree (for example: having the audience list or jot down a few ideas to an opening question).
  4. Poster Potluck: Please indicate whether or not you would be interested in sharing a poster for the “Poster Potluck.”

 

Questions?  Please email Jennifer Wells at jwells@mercyhsb.com.

 

We look forward to sharing the day with you!


Computers and Writing 2009

Location: University of California Davis, Davis, California
Date: June 18, 2009 to June 21, 2009
URL: http://conferences.ucdavis.edu/cw09.
Contact: Carl Whithaus at cwwhithaus@ucdavis.edu
Description:

 

Ubiquitous and Sustainable Computing
@ School @ Work @ Play
 
 
Call for Papers:
Computers and Writing 2009
University of California, Davis
June 18-21, 2009
 
Computers and Writing 2009 seeks papers that explore the complex social, pedagogical and institutional dynamics around ubiquitous and/or sustainable computing. Because computing technologies continue to extend their reach, we encourage proposals that explain the impact and challenges of ubiquitous and sustainable computing in different contexts: in educational settings, in workplaces, and even into (real or virtual) leisure spaces. We are especially interested in accounts of how teachers and students, workers and writers use computers and other technologies in their lives at school, at work and at play.
 
When Computers and Writing began, the desktop revolution was just beginning and mainframes were a not-so-distant memory. Since 1983 computers have gotten smaller and faster and more portable, and have therefore become more embedded in our lives. Computing has become ubiquitous. We find computers in more homes, in more workplaces, and in more schools, though the uses and meanings of technology can differ greatly across these contexts. Our interactions with technology have also expanded from the keyboards, mice, and screens of desktop computers to cell phones, microphones for speech to text input, PDAs that recognize handwriting, digital cameras, digital audio recorders, GPS navigators, and other ever-emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs). Today's ubiquitous computing is not quite the utopia imagined by Howard Rheingold or Mark Weiser nor is it the dystopia predicted by Clifford Stoll or Philip K. Dick; it is a rather more interesting, nuanced, and complex world than we’d imagined. 
 
Ubiquitous computing has produced a series of challenges for educational institutions. Sustainable computing means finding ways to meet current technological needs without sacrificing future innovation. As teachers and scholars of writing, how do we avoid the curse of technological obsolescence, even as computing rapidly evolves and expands into new corners of lived experience? How do our uses of technology move beyond short-term interventions, and contribute to sustained and sustainable learning across the life-span of our students? Finally, how do we employ these technologies ethically, given their potential impact on a local and global scale? Ultimately at stake is not just the sustainability of computing, but also how computing can help us lead more sustainable lives.
 

Submissions Open: Monday, April 28, 2008
Submission Deadline: Friday, September 19, 2008
Submit Proposals (250 words or less) at http://conferences.ucdavis.edu/cw09

25th Annual NEWCA Conference

Location: West Hartford, CT
Date: April 4, 2009 to April 5, 2009
URL: http://www.newca-conference.com/2009/index.htm .
Contact: Michelle Cox at michelle.cox@bridgew.edu
Description:

NEWCA @ 25:
Revisit, Reflect, Renew
University of Hartford, W. Hartford, CT
Saturday, April 4, 8:30 am to 5:30 pm and Sunday, April 5, 8:30 am to 11:00 am
http://www.newca-conference.com/

During this, our silver anniversary, we will explore writing center histories,
present(s), and futures. The twenty-fifth year benchmark provides us with an
opportunity to revisit, reflect, and renew—to consider the dynamic nature of
writing center work as well as the importance of knowing, sharing, and learning
from our histories. We hope that you join us!
 
Conference Highlights
!    Dr. Harvey Kail, University of Maine, Orono, keynote speaker
!    NEWCA’s 25th Birthday Celebration, with historical presentation by Dr. Neal
Lerner
!    Interactive Panels, Workshops and Roundtables
Three concurrent sessions will be held on Saturday, April 4, presented by
writing center tutors and administrators in the NEWCA region and beyond.
!    National Archive for Composition and Rhetoric Exhibit
Be sure to bring documents that illustrate the history or daily work of your
writing center to donate to this collection. Refer to the NEWCA website for more
information.
!    NEWCA Book and Media Exhibit, Saturday, April 4, 10:30am-5:30pm
!    NEWCA Special Interest Groups, Sunday, April 5, 9:00am-11:00am
!    NEWACC Workshop on Writing Across the Curriculum Program Assessment,
Sunday, April 5, 9:00am-11:30am
For more information on NEWACC (the Northeast Writing Across the
Curriculum Consortium), please contact Dr. Michelle Cox, Assistant Professor of
English and WAC Coordinator at Bridgewater State College, at
michelle.cox@bridgew.edu or (508) 531-2183.
 
Conference Registration Information
You may register for the NEWCA 2009 conference online until March 27. Please
refer to the NEWCA website at http://www.newca-conference.com/ for registration
forms, methods of payment and more!
Conference registration rates:

Full-Time Faculty/Professional at $110 (includes meals and NEWCA membership)
Part-Time Faculty/Professional at $75 (includes meals and NEWCA membership)
Student at $40 (includes meals and NEWCA membership)
NEWCA membership at $15 (to maintain membership if not attending the conference)

NOTE: For those registering after the March 27th deadline, lunch is not
guaranteed.


NEWCA 2009 Conference Hotel Information
Book by Tuesday, March 17th to get the special NEWCA rate: $109 at the Crowne
Plaza Hotel, at 50 Morgan Street in Hartford, only 3 miles from campus.  Call
866-539-0036 and reference the “NEWCA Conference” or the three-letter code “NTW”
when making reservations.. 


 


ECWCA 2009 Conference

Location: Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Date: April 3, 2009 to April 4, 2009
URL: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/ecwca.
Contact: Linda Bergmann, Writing Lab Director at lbergmann@purdue.edu
Description:

East Central Writing Centers Association 2009 Conference

April 3-4, 2009

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

 

Writing Center Ecologies:  Developing and Sustaining Our Resources

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/ecwca

 
The term "ecology" has many associations, from nature and the
environment, to more recent applications of information ecology and
media ecology in rhetoric and composition. The metaphor of ecology can
be applied to the relationships among various projects and working
groups within writing centers, and to the relationships among writing
centers, writing programs, English Departments, WAC initiatives,
strategic plans, etc.  Tutors, writing center administrators, and others
involved with writing center work are invited to submit proposals
related-but not limited to-the following topics:

 

*   Consider the politics of ecology and the idea of ecologies as
systems.  How does your writing center function as an ecological system?
What are the ecologies of your department and your campus?  


*   How do you ensure the sustainability of your writing center?
How will you address challenges to ensure sustainability?
 

*   What kind of partnerships, relationships and/or infrastructure
have you used to develop and enrich your resources?  How can you extend
existing partnerships and cultivate new ones?  What does your writing
center bring to these partnerships?
 

*   How do writing center theories sustain both in-house
environments and larger, public spaces?  How do writing centers perform
"public scholarship" that sustains us and the community? 


*   How do you build a self-sustaining ecology in your writing
center through policies, practices, and relationships?
 

*   What are the environmental issues facing your writing center?
How can you develop a "green culture" in your center?  What are some
creative solutions you have for making your writing center greener? Why
should writing center tutors and administrators be concerned with
environmental issues?  


*   How does technology fit into your ecology?
 

*   In what ways can globalization and diversity affect the ecology
of your writing center?  
 

Session Formats

Presentations: Single presentations will be 15-20 minutes in length.  If
you submit your proposal alone you will be placed with like
presentations for a session.  


Panels: Consist of 3-4 presenters who are coordinating their
presentations around a central theme.  Each presentation will be 15-20
minutes in length.

 
Roundtables: Round tables are talks designed around a specific theme and
are often highly audience interactive.  Several speakers will address a
central question from a variety of angles, and then open the question to
the audience and answer audience questions.

 
Workshops: These sessions are designed to be fully interactive with the
audience and facilitate the audience in gaining material, hands-on
knowledge around the given topic.  


Posters: These presentations are designed to be stand alone posters
which are informative and meant to be viewed at anytime during the
conference.  There will also be a dedicated time and space for the
authors of the poster to answer questions and interact with conference
goers about their topic.  

 

Submitting Proposals

 
Proposals should be submitted online using the webform which will be
available at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/ecwca.  The online submission
system should be ready shortly, but this gives you a chance to plan your
proposals in advance.  The deadline for proposals is Monday, December
15, 2008.

 
For questions or comments, please contact:

 
Linda Bergmann, Writing Lab Director

lbergmann@purdue.edu

 


2009 MAWCA Conference

Location: York, PA
Date: March 27, 2009 to March 28, 2009
URL: http://www.ycp.edu/lrc/mawca2009.html.
Description:

The 2009 MAWCA Conference will be held at York College of Pennsylvania in York, PA, March 27-28, 2009.  The theme for the
conference is "`A Firm League of Friendship: Declaring the Interdependence of Writing Programs and Writing Centers."  Muriel Harris will be the keynote speaker.  Deadline for paper proposals is December 20.  To find the call for papers and other information about the conference, please visit the conference website:

http://www.ycp.edu/lrc/mawca2009.html


Computers and Writing Online 2009

Location: http://writingprogram.ucdavis.edu/cw2009/
Date: February 16, 2009 to March 1, 2009
URL: http://writingprogram.ucdavis.edu/cw2009/.
Contact: Carl Whithaus at cwwhithaus@ucdavis.edu
Description:
Computers and Writing Online 2009

Deadline: 1/5/09 midnight PST
Conference: 2/16/09-3/1/09

http://writingprogram.ucdavis.edu/cw2009/

Computers and Writing Online 2009 seeks online presentations and discussions that explore the complex social, pedagogical and institutional dynamics around ubiquitous and/or sustainable computing.  Because computing technologies continue to extend their reach, we encourage proposals that explain the impact and challenges of ubiquitous and sustainable computing in different contexts: in educational settings, in workplaces, and even into (real or virtual) leisure spaces. Connections between sessions proposed for the f2f version of Computers and Writing at UC Davis in June 2009 are encouraged but not required. Presenters may propose:

 
    * synchronous sessions in Second Life,
    * synchronous sessions using Adobe Connect Pro,
    * 2-day list-serv discussions,
    * week-long forum topics in Sakai,
    * week-long wiki building activities in Sakai,
    * podcasts played through Sakai, or
    * other innovative online formats.

 
We are especially interested in accounts of how teachers and students, workers and writers use computers and other technologies in their lives at school, at work and at play.

 
Ubiquitous computing has produced a series of challenges for educational institutions. Sustainable computing means finding ways to meet current technological needs without sacrificing future innovation. As teachers and scholars of writing, how do we avoid the curse of technological obsolescence, even as computing rapidly evolves and expands into new corners of lived experience? How do our uses of technology move beyond short-term interventions, and contribute to sustained and sustainable learning across the life-span of our students? Finally, how do we employ these technologies ethically, given their potential impact on a local and global scale? Ultimately at stake is not just the sustainability of computing, but also how computing can help us lead more sustainable lives.

 
Not only has computing become ubiquitous, human interactions with technology have expanded from the keyboards, mice, and screens of desktop computers to cell phones, microphones for speech to text input, PDAs that recognize handwriting, digital cameras, digital audio recorders, GPS navigators, and other ever-emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs). Today's computing is not quite the utopia imagined by Howard Rheingold or Mark Weiser, nor is it the dystopia predicted by Clifford Stoll or Philip K. Dick; it is a rather more interesting, nuanced, and complex world than we’d imagined.  Proposals that allow us to experience or imagine the emerging forms of ubiquitous and/or sustainable computing and their impacts on our lives at school, at work, and at home are sought.

 
Best,
Carl

 

 
Carl Whithaus
Associate Professor
University Writing Program
University of California, Davis
361 Voorhies Hall
Davis, CA 95616

 
530 754-6903

Biannual Conference on Writing Across a Critical Thinking Continuum

Location: Quinnipiac University
Date: November 21, 2008 to November 22, 2008
URL: https://www.quinnipiac.edu/x1049.xml.
Contact: Valerie Boyle at quwac08conf@quinnipiac.edu
Description:

 

Quinnipiac University
275 Mt. Carmel Avenue
Hamden, CT 06518
Biannual Conference on Writing Across a Critical Thinking Continuum
November 21-22, 2008
            We are very pleased to invite you to the second bi-annual conference on Writing and Critical Thinking at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT. The conference explores the relationship between critical and creative thinking strategies to writing processes across our curricula and disciplinary domains. Our website provides complete details about the registering for the conference. To access our conference page to access the full conference program, travel to Hamden, CT and to register for the conference please click on: https://www.quinnipiac.edu/x1049.xml     
The keynote address will be given by Jonathan Monroe of Cornell University, where he is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Comparative Literature, former Director of the John S. Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines and George Reed Professor of Writing and Rhetoric. He is the author A Poverty of Objects: The Prose Poem and the Politics of Genre (Cornell), and editor and co-author of Local Knowledges, Local Practices: Writing in the Disciplines at Cornell (Pittsburgh) and Writing and Revising the Disciplines (Cornell).  Dr. Monroe will speak about the connections between writing and critical thinking in his presentation entitled “Is Critical Thinking a Liberal Art: Contemporary Poetry in (as) Higher Education.” Many other WAC professionals have prepared presentations centered around our three themes of (re)defining the continuum between writing and thinking, (re)possessing the continuum of writing and thinking in the disciplines and (re)addressing the continuum of thinking and writing iterations. All events take place on Quinnipiac University’s Mount Carmel campus.
To register, click on: https://www.applyweb.com/public/register?s=quinwrit

 


2008 WPA Conference

Date: July 10, 2008 to July 13, 2008
URL: http://wpacouncil.org/2008confCFP.
Description:

Writing Program Administration and/as Learning

 

Denver Grand Hyatt Hotel
Denver, Colorado
July 10-13, 2008

Deadline for proposals: March 15, 2008
 

The conference will begin Thursday evening, July 10, and continue through Sunday morning, July 13. We invite proposals for individual presentations, panels, workshops, forums roundtables and other sessions addressing the conference theme, "Writing Program Administration and/as Learning."

We also invite attendees to prepare poster presentations or other exhibits of their programs' special initiatives, research projects, or signature areas.

To allow conference attendees to begin planning as soon as possible, review of proposals for individual presentations, concurrent session panels, roundtables, poster sessions, and multimedia presentations will occur on a rolling basis after February 15, with notifications also sent on that basis. Proposals received after March 15 will be considered on a space-available basis only.

Explanation of Conference Theme

Our goal is to examine WPAs as learners - as teachers – and as learned contributors to students’ lives, to knowledge, and to higher education. We will come together in Denver to work toward a better understanding of WPA work as an intellectual and a pedagogical activity with a rich and complicated history. I invite you to think about some of the following topics and questions. --Joe Janangelo, Program Chair

This list is suggestive. You are welcome to propose any ideas not explicitly tied to the conference theme but important to writing program administration. WPA work occurs in multiple and intersecting spheres and arenas. Hence, these questions are meant to be generative, not exhaustive. We welcome your ideas and approaches!

Once again, this list is suggestive. You are welcome to propose any ideas not explicitly tied to the conference theme but important to writing program administration.


Writing Beyond Borders—Writing Studies Across Disciplinary and National Borders

Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada,
Date: June 1, 2008 to June 3, 2008
URL: http://cattw-acprts.mcgill.ca/conference2008/en/cfp.htm.
Contact: Heather Graves at hgraves@rogers.com
Description:

 Open Call for Proposals

 

(please also see http://cattw-acprts.mcgill.ca/conference2008/en/cfp.htm)

[La version française suivra bientôt.] 

The Canadian Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (CATTW)/L'Association canadienne de professeurs de rédaction technique et scientifique (ACPRTS) is inviting proposals for its interdisciplinary international conference "Writing Beyond Borders—Writing Studies Across Disciplinary and National Borders," to be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from June 1-3, 2008 in collaboration with the 2008 Congress of the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences (FHSS).

Rationale for the Conference

In line with the Congress theme of "Thinking Beyond Borders—Global Ideas: Global Values," the conference addresses recent changes in writing as a multifaceted knowledge-making practice across diverse academic, workplace, and national communities —changes that result from the recent shift toward a more digitally-mediated globalized community. Global ideas are very much created and maintained through written arguments, and they are intimately connected with global values—the values and beliefs that form the warrants for arguments about global issues such as sustainability, human rights, international trade, and the environment. Since writing studies is one of the key fundamentally interdisciplinary areas of study, research in writing is crucially important to efforts to understand global discourse.

Our conference theme—"Writing Beyond Borders—Writing Studies Across Disciplinary and National Borders"—points to the ways in which writing is used to mediate and construct discourse about the global ideas and values. It also encourages conference participants to examine the metaphorical borders of research in writing studies: rhetoric, composition, discourse analysis, cognitive psychology, writing across the curriculum and writing in the disciplines, linguistics, and English studies.

Conference Objectives

For this purpose, the conference organizers invite proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, or workshops that examine how writing practices have changed in varying academic, workplace, and global communities.  Proposals are also encouraged to examine the implications of these changes for the study and teaching of academic and professional writing and communication.

We encourage presenters to propose papers that extend beyond those borders to connect ideas from outside the disciplinary (writing studies) and national territories.  Suggested themes and questions include, but are not limited to the following:

Presentation and Proposal Formats

The conference organizers value diversity in approaches, perspectives and presentation formats, including 15-20 minute individual papers, 90-minute panels of 3 - 5 speakers, roundtables, or 90-minute workshops.

For individual presentations and panels, we are interested in both research reports and state-of-the-art papers that engage the literature and theories to derive new research questions, agendas, and directions. In either case, proposals should include the research question to be addressed, its significance for advancing research in the field, the conceptual framework and methods or approach used to address the question, and key findings or directions as well as their implications for practice, teaching, or future research. Proposals for individual papers should not exceed 150 words (+references). Panel proposals should include a brief (<100 words) description of the panel, its rationale and objectives, as well as brief descriptions of up to 150 words (+ references) of each paper to be presented and discussed on the panel.

Roundtable proposals should raise a provocative, but critical question for the study and teaching of writing, specify the names and contributions of at least 5 individuals who have agreed to participate in the roundtable. Proposals should also outline the rationale for the roundtable, its objectives, and the suggested discussion points. Proposals should not exceed 150 words (+references).

Workshop proposals should provide a 150-word description (+references) of the workshop, its rationale, objectives, research base, facilitators, procedures, and logistical requirements (e.g., computer labs, software, hardware, etc.).

Opportunities for submitting papers to peer-reviewed scholarly publications will be available (more information to follow).

Deadlines

We plan to apply for SSHRC funding for travel grants. If you would like to apply for reimbursement for travel funding, please send your proposal to us by September 20, 2007. If you do not need travel funding, please send your proposal to us by September 30, 2007.

Where to Submit Proposals

Please email proposals with your complete contact information to the program co-chair, Heather Graves, at hgraves@rogers.com.


2008 International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

Location: University of Texas at Austin
Date: May 28, 2008 to May 31, 2008
URL: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/progs/wac/conferences/iwacc/ ....
Contact: Susan “George” Schorn at gsschorn@mail.utexas.edu
Description:

 Ninth Bi-annual 2008 International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

The University of Texas at Austin is proud to host the 2008 International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference. The event will feature panelists and speakers from around the world (TBA).

This year’s conference will focus on how WAC professionals articulate theories and practices, the benefits of inter-disciplinary work, and the translation of our work for students, academic staff, administration, and those outside the academy. Read the Call for Papers for more details. Proposal deadline is Friday, September 28, 2007.

WAC 2008 will be held in the Radisson Hotel and Suites on the shores of the Colorado River in downtown Austin. History, nature, scholarship, fine arts, warm weather, the world’s largest urban bat colony, and any kind of music you can think of are all within a short walk or bus ride.

Register before March 7, 2008, for lowest rates. Registration opens end of January, 2008.


Pacific Northwest Writing Centers Association Fifth Annual Conference

Location: Everett, Washington
Date: April 25, 2008 to April 26, 2008
URL: http://www.pnwca.org/ .
Contact: Ann Harrington at aharrington@everettcc.edu
Description:

  

Call for Proposals

Pacific Northwest Writing Centers Association

Fifth Annual Conference   

Everett Community College, Washington

April 25 and 26, 2008

 

Are We Having Fun Yet? Cultivating Daily Joy in our Writing Centers

Keynote Speaker: Shanti Bruce

 

Let's gather in Everett to explore ways to make or keep our work fun, for ourselves and the student writers we work with daily. The conference's simple title masks many contradictions and complexities:

 

"Are" – This verb's sole function here is to help another. Whom are we helping?

Are we learning as we are serving?

What everyday choices are we making?

How are we balancing service and support for others with service and support for ourselves – as peer students trying to get our own work done, as administrators and faculty with competing responsibilities, as writers outside of work also, and as individuals with full personal lives that may or may not intersect with what we are doing in the writing center every day.

 

"We" – Who are we?

What brings us to the center? What brings students here?

Who are we in terms of ethnicity, age, gender, experience, etc.?

How many diverse voices are truly heard? How do we reach every writer?

Where are we located – in our departments, on our campuses, and in our communities?

What messages do we convey through the names we use for ourselves: tutors/consultants/assistants … administrators/directors/coordinators … students/clients/customers/writers … center/lab/resource/office?

 

"Having" – This present participle reflects a moment-by-moment reality. How do we support each other?

What do we gain from our daily experiences? What do student writers gain?

How are we empowering ourselves and all student writers to be heroic: to take risks and experience joy?

In what ways are we meeting our own expectations? What resources do we have to accomplish these: time, money, staff, training, professional development, our own wisdom, etc.?

How do we use our resources?

How do online and other technologies truly bring us closer together?

What is our institutional footprint? Which side are we on? Do we have or have not?

 

"Fun" – This is the bottom line. How do we stay alive?

What is fun about writing? About writing consulting? How do we fall in love, or back in love?

How do we balance fun with expectation, learning to be productive in less enjoyable contexts?

How are we bound or supported by the rules and conventions of our discipline, or our institution?

In what ways do we reject the notion of play?

How do we make conscious choices to enjoy the ride?

 

"Yet" – Time spans past, present, and future. What got us into this? Why we are still here?

How do we encourage scholarship, as individuals, as a region, and as a discipline?

What will our careers look like one, five, ten years from now?

How are we inspiring both ourselves and the students we tutor to expand the scholarly conversation? 

We need to reflect honestly, with perspectives both short and long. How are we negotiating the

present? How will we continue to experience the joy of writing center work?


2008 Northeast Writing Centers Association Conference

Location: Burlington, VT
Date: April 12, 2008 to April 13, 2008
Contact: Pat Morelli at pmorelli@hartford.edu
Description:

Northeast Writing Centers Association                                               
2008 Call for Proposals


CTRL/ALT/DEL

University of Vermont, Burlington

Saturday, April 12, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm and Sunday, April 13, 8:30 am to 11:00 am

Proposals due by December 31, 2007

Keynote Speakers:    Dr. Anne Ellen Geller, Dr. Michele Eodice, Dr. Frankie
Condon, Dr. Meg Carroll, and Dr. Elizabeth Boquet, the celebrated authors of The Everyday Writing Center: A Community of Practice, will collaborate to kick start the twenty-fourth
meeting of the NEWCA conference.  Individually, these scholars, harkening from
St. John's University, the University of Oklahoma, University of
Nebraska-Lincoln, Rhode Island College, and Fairfield University, have each
displayed ongoing commitment to writing center scholarship and the wider writing
center community, as well as ongoing support of NEWCA.  Together, they have
written a book that pushes us to think more deeply about the unique situation of
the writing center, using the metaphor of the trickster to explore the fluidity
of writing centers, the compelling contradictions of the spaces writing centers
occupy both figuratively and literally, and the opportunities for using the
dynamic nature of writing center work to enhance the possibilities of writing
centers as multidisciplinary centers for learning and community.  

Conference Theme: CTRL/ALT/DEL

Ctrl/Alt/Del is a combination of computer keystrokes used to restart an
operating system.  As such, the term "Control-Alt-Delete" evokes not only the
influence of technology but also themes of regeneration and persistence-recurring
themes for writing center administrators, peer tutors, and student writers. 

This term speaks to the dynamic nature of writing center work and raises
questions about how much the writing center is a controlling force or opens
space for alternative discourses, how vulnerable writing centers are to deletion
while also flexible enough to accommodate change and the many forms of
rebooting/restarting, how technologies inform writing center work with differing
amounts of visibility and influence, and how collaborative learning, talking,
and writing continue to center and empower writing center work. 

NEWCA is using Ctrl/Alt/Del and its distinct components control, alternative,
and delete as rhetorical frames for examining writing center research and
practices.  We invite proposals that investigate questions such as: 

(Ctrl)    What types of control do writers have over their academic writing?

How do material, technological, or institutional forces control the work of
writing centers? 

To what extent is the writing center is a controlling force, a force that
normalizes student discourse and writing?

(Alt)   How are alternative and normalized discourses negotiated through writing
tutorials? 

What alternative tutor or administrator practices enhance the work of writing
centers? 

(Del) What must be deleted-put aside-in order to rewrite, revise, re-center? 

How vulnerable are writing centers or writing center missions to deletion? 

(Ctrl/Alt/Del)    How do writing centers restart their missions to foster even
more effective collaborations? 

This year we would like to continue to reach out to community college and high
school writing centers in order to include more voices and perspectives in our
ongoing discussion. We also highly encourage tutors and first-time presenters to
send in proposals.  Your proposed panel, discussion, presentation, or workshop
should actively involve the audience.  We welcome presentations of original
scholarship and research in formats that foster active dialog with conference
participants.  Historically, successful panels are dynamic exchanges between
audience members comprised peer tutors, graduate students and other writing
center professionals and faculty.

Proposal Guidelines

Please prepare a 250- to 500-word proposal and a 75-word abstract for either a
20-minute individual presentation or a 75-minute panel/roundtable. 

Please include the following information in your proposal:

*   Proposer's name, position (i.e. tutor, director, etc), institution,
institutional or home address, telephone number, and email address
*   Presenters' names with title and contact information, as above
*   Title of presentation, one-page description of presentation, and a 75-word
abstract for inclusion in the conference program
*   Type of session (i.e. panel presentation, roundtable discussion, individual
presentation)
*   Specific audiovisual and technical requests

Proposals will be evaluated on the basis of relevance to the conference theme
and its application to a broad audience of writing center tutors and administrators.  Submissions will also be reviewed on the basis of originality (novel perspectives, approaches, and methods), interactivity (audience participation vs. oral delivery of an essay), and clarity.


Proposal Submission

Submit your proposal by December 31, 2007, either electronically or by mail. 

*   Electronic submissions should be sent as an MS Word attachment or included
in the body of the email to the chair of the NEWCA Proposal Reading Committee,
Pat Morelli, at pmorelli@hartford.edu.  
*   Mailed submissions should be sent to: Pat Morelli, Director, Center for
Reading and Writing, University of Hartford, 200 Bloomfield Avenue, West
Hartford, CT 06117

If you need more information about submitting proposals, please contact Pat
Morelli at pmorelli@hartford.edu or (860) 768-4139.




MAWCA 2008

Location: Philadelphia, PA
Date: April 12, 2008 to April 12, 2008
URL: http://faculty.mc3.edu/hhalbert/MAWCA/2008/.
Description:

 MAWCA 2008: Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association 19th Annual Conference
"Liberty and Literacy"
Saturday, April 12th, 2008
Temple University, Philadelphia, PA

The organizers of the 19th Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association invite proposals that consider writing center work as it relates to liberty and literacy. High school students, graduate and undergraduate college students, writing center professionals, faculty and instructors are encouraged to submit proposals.

The following are some possible topics, but please feel free to expand the list.
Proposals for individual presentations (15 minutes), panel presentations (45 minutes), roundtable discussions (45 minutes) and poster presentations are welcome. Proposals are due by Friday, January 4th. To submit a proposal, please download a copy of the proposal form at http://faculty.mc3.edu/hhalbert/MAWCA/2008/CFP.html and email the completed proposal to MAWCA2008@temple.edu.

Writing Research across Borders

Location: UC Santa Barbara
Date: February 22, 2008 to February 24, 2008
URL: http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/wrconf08/.
Description:

WRITING RESEARCH ACROSS BORDERS

AN INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE

2008 Santa Barbara Conference on Writing Research
University of California Santa Barbara
February 22-24, 2008


Call for Proposals:

Theme:  Writing Research Across Borders
Due Date:  May 1
Length: under 300 words

The Gevirtz Graduate School of Education and the Writing Programs at the
University of California, Santa Barbara and the University of
California, Davis invite proposals for their interdisciplinary
conference, "Writing Research Across Borders," to be held February
22-24, 2008 in Santa Barbara, California.

This is an exciting time where research on writing is having many
births, rebirths, and growing spurts in many nations, with foci on many
levels of schooling and development across the lifespan.  At the 2008
Santa Barbara Conference on Writing Research we hope to foster dialogues
across different writing research traditions, located in varied
national, disciplinary, and programmatic venues. We have invited a
premier panel of plenary and featured speakers to represent the
diversity of writing research in the world and to open the door for
further broad participation from researchers of all nations interested
in exploring writing across all life stages, institutional settings, and
disciplinary approaches.

This conference follows on the successes of the 2002 and 2005 Santa
Barbara Conferences on Writing Research, which had the themes of
"Writing as A Human Activity" and "Writing Research in the Making."
Information about the 2005 conference is available at
http://education.ucsb.edu/netshare/wrconf05/.  Further information about
our upcoming 2008 conference is available at
http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/wrconf08/.

We invite proposals for panels, roundtables, and individual
presentations that discuss works in progress, completed research, and
reflections on how writing research is conceived, proposed, funded,
carried out, published, and responded to.  Conference proposals should
be submitted by May 1, 2007.  Proposals should be under 300 words and in
English (for a fuller statement on  language diversity at our
conference, please see
http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/wrconf08/language.html ). Please send
proposals via email (as a Microsoft Word attachment or in the email
body) to writing@education.ucsb.edu or send paper copies to the address
below.


TRAVEL ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS:

In addition, through the generosity of the Writing Program of the
University of California at Davis and Chris Thaiss, the Clark Kerr
Professor of Writing at UC Davis, we are able to offer a small number of
fellowships to help support travel expenses for speakers.  Fellowships
will be awarded based on financial need and proposal quality.  If you
would like to apply for a fellowship, please submit a separate
fellowship application letter explaining your need for funding.

If you have questions about the fellowship application letter or other
aspects of the submission process, please feel free to contact Dr.
Charles Bazerman or Suzie Null, the Writing Research Across Borders
Conference Coordinators.  Both can be reached at the address at the
bottom of the page.

Thank you for your interest in our conference.  If you have any
questions please contact us at the above addresses below.

For the Organizing Committee,

Charles Bazerman
Sheridan Blau
Robert Krut
Susan McLeod
Suzie Null
Paul Rogers
Amanda Stansell

http://www.writing.ucsb.edu/wrconf08/.
writing@education.ucsb.edu


Committee Contact Information:
writing@education.ucsb.edu.
or
Writing Research Across Borders Conference
Proposal Committee
c/o Charles Bazerman
Gevirtz Graduate School of Education
UC Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9490


2008 Southeastern Writing Centers Association Conference

Location: Savannah, Georgia
Date: February 7, 2008 to February 9, 2008
URL: http://www.llp.armstrong.edu/swca/swca2008cfp.html .
Contact: Deborah Reese at reesedeb@mail.armstrong.edu
Description:

 2008 Conference: "Work in Progress, Destination Unknown"

February 7—9, 2008 | Savannah, Georgia | Armstrong Center | hosted by
Armstrong Atlantic State University

Call for Papers

SWCA's 2008 conference aims to provide a forum for ideas about new
directions in writing center practice.

Writing center theory—combining aspects of administration,
communication, hermeneutics, language, pedagogy, psychology, rhetoric,
semiotics, etc.—lies at the heart of writing center practice. Theory, we
contend, should be thoughtfully deliberated before new practices are
broadly advocated.

We are open to conference proposals articulating theories spanning the
entire range of practices relevant to writing center operations. We have
so many things to think about. For instance, how might we anticipate and
counter institutional challenges to what we do? How might we enhance our
tutoring by incorporating advanced technology or multimedia applications
into our sessions? How might movements within contemporary literature
inform the ways in which we tutor? How might we expand our services by
launching satellite locations? How might we find and allocate resources
to meet our projected needs? How might we promote the establishment of
writing centers in non-university settings, such as high schools, police
academies, seminaries, business schools, and so on? These questions
highlight only a few of the theoretical and practical concerns
confronting us.

Proposals will be evaluated on the basis of theoretical importance,
originality, clarity, and relevance to a broad audience. Interactive
presentations, discussion panels, and poster displays are especially
encouraged. Proposals may address tested theories as well as those still
being tested, with an emphasis on novel perspectives, approaches, and
methods.

Please forward your proposals/abstracts by Friday, October 12, to Dr.
Deborah Reese at reesedeb@mail.armstrong.edu.
Respondents will be notified of acceptance Monday, October 29—Friday,
November 2.

| URL: http://www.llp.armstrong.edu/swca/swca2008cfp.html


Literacies of Hope: Making Meaning Across Boundaries

Location: Bejing, China
Date: July 23, 2007 to July 27, 2007
URL: http://educ@globalinteractions.org.
Description:

 

Literacies of Hope:  Making Meaning Across Boundaries

 

China-U.S. Conference on Literacy

Beijing, People's Republic of China

July 23-26, 2007

 

Deadline Extended

Please submit abstracts by January 22, 2007

 

Conference Strands:

 

Print Literacy / Media Literacy / Oral Literacy

Technology & Literacy

Creative & Critical Thinking

Social & Cultural Literacy

TESOL/ELL

 

For additional information, please contact:

Global Interactions, Inc. |  14 West Cheryl Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85201 

 Phone: 602.906.8886 | Fax: 602.906.8887

educ@globalinteractions.orgwww.globalinteractions.org

 


2007 IWCA/SCWCA Conference

Location: Houston, TX
Date: April 12, 2007 to April 14, 2007
Contact: Dagmar Corrigan at corrigand@uhd.edu
Description: International Writing Centers Association and
South Central Writing Centers Association
Call for Proposals
April 12-14, 2007
The Magnolia Hotel
Houston, TX

"A Space for Writing:  Writing Centers and Place"

Houston occupies a place in the world's mind as "Space City - a place of infinite possibilities," inextricably linked to NASA, oil, and cancer research.  Little-known to those outside of Texas, Houston occupies in its own mind the place known as H-Town, the Bayou City, 713, 281, and 832 (area codes for the surrounding metropolitan area). Each of these defines Houston in different but meaningful ways.

Writing centers are also "places of infinite possibilities," or are they?   In thinking about our writing center work, how does the rhetorical notion of space and place define our writing center ethos, the work we do, the people we serve, the theories we create, and the spaces we inhabit? For this conference, the organizers reach out to the community college writing centers and ask how do community colleges define writing center space? How do writing centers define the community colleges' place?
 
IWCA/SCWCA 2007 invites attendees to explore new frontiers-to boldly go where no writing center conference has gone before.  Broad interpretations of the following topics are warmly encouraged.  Sample topics include, but are not limited to:
*   Physical space
*   Rhetorical space
*   Mental space
*   Cultural space
*   Gendered space
*   Racial space
*   Inclusive/exclusive space
*   Minimal space
*   Visual space
*   Historical space
*   Virtual space
*   Spacing out

The following strands on timeless Writing Center topics are also welcome:  ESL, tutor training, WAC, grammar, administration, assessment, technology, theory, and research. 

Prepare a 500 word proposal and a 75 word abstract for poster sessions, 20-minute individual presentations, 90-minute panels/roundtables, 90-minute workshops, ½ day pre-conference workshops, or ½ day post-conference workshops.  Proposals may be submitted online to (web address forthcoming) or via surface mail to:  Dagmar Corrigan, University of Houston-Downtown, Dept. of English, One Main Street, Houston, TX  77002. 

Proposal Deadline:          September 15, 2006
Acceptance Notification:    December 15, 2006

For questions, please email Dagmar Corrigan at corrigand@uhd.edu



MAWCA 2007 Conference

Location: St. Davids, PA
Date: March 30, 2007 to March 31, 2007
URL: http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/mawca/2007conference/index.htm ....
Description:

The MAWCA 2007 committee is happy to announce it's registration time! 

The Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association will hold its 18th Annual Conference at Eastern University in St. Davids, PA on March 30-31.  This year's theme is
Growing More Attentive to the Manner of Writing: Looking at the Writing Center through the Spectacles of Franklin.

If we look at our writing centers through the lens of Benjamin Franklin’s career, what will we see?  How are we, like Franklin,

Keynote speakers Jon Olson and Corinne Thatcher explore the possibilities of "Benjamin Franklin's Writing Center." Other key events:

Join us in suburban Philadelphia, a region shaped by Franklin’s vision, as we celebrate his 300th birthday and our work in writing centers.


2007 Northern California Writing Centers Association Conference

Location: Sacramento, California
Date: March 3, 2007 to March 3, 2007
URL: http://www.csus.edu/writingcenter/ncwca.
Contact: Cherryl Smith at writingcenter@csus.edu
Description:

2007 NCWCA 14th Annual Conference

Creativity and the Writing Center

March 3, 2007Sacramento State University

Sacramento, California

Deadline: December 20, 2007


The Northern California Writing Centers Association is pleased to announce a call for proposals for its 2007 annual conference on March 3, 2007,  “Creativity and the Writing Center,” to be held at Sacramento State University. We are delighted to present Dr. Sondra Perl, Professor of English, Lehman College, CUNY as the keynote speaker.


Creativity may not be the first association that tutors, faculty, students, and administrators make when thinking of writing centers, but creativity is important in every aspect of writing center life, from tutor training to working with writers to running the writing center. We encourage proposals that discuss creative approaches to writing center theory and practice and the role of creativity in the day-to-day life of a writing center.


To submit an individual or panel proposal, send a title and abstract of 150-300 words to Professor Cherryl Smith, conference chair, at writingcenter@csus.edu. Please include presenter(s) name, institutional affiliation, and contact information, including email.


The submission deadline is Dec. 20, 2006. For the program registration form and additional conference information, visit our website at http://www.csus.edu/writingcenter/ncwca.


Computers and Writing 2008

Location: Athens, Georgia
Date: December 8, 2006 to December 8, 2006
URL: http://www.english.uga.edu/cdesmet/CW2008.
Contact: Christy Desmet at cdesmet@english.uga
Description:

The CCCC Committee on Computers in Composition and Communication
is pleased to announce the site of the 2008 annual Computers and
Writing Conference, May 21-24 at the University of Georgia in Athens.
Congratulations to Christy Desmet, Nelson Hilton, and Ron Balthazor
for submitting the winning proposal.  For more information, including
the proposal, please see:

http://www.english.uga.edu/cdesmet/CW2008/

and direct all inquiries to Christy Desmet, cdesmet@english.uga.edu.


Rhetorics and Technologies: the 20th Penn State Conferenc eon Rhetoric and Composition

Location: State College, Pennsylvania
Date: December 8, 2006 to December 8, 2006
URL: http://www.outreach.psu.edu/cnf/rhetoric/.
Contact: John Farris at JLF30@outreach.psu.edu
Description:

 

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

For more than two decades, the biennial Penn State Conference on Rhetoric and Composition has been an important forum for scholars interested in rhetoric and the teaching of writing. This year the conference is celebrating its twentieth anniversary of providing participants with the opportunity to share ideas with leading scholars and to enjoy the intimate and informal setting of The Nittany Lion Inn on the Penn State University Park campus.  

CONFERENCE THEME

Rhetorical activities have always taken place in technological contexts of one sort or another, whether a scriptorium, a traditional classroom, a state-of-the-art cybertorium, or other work space, private as well as public. In this day and age those contexts have become ever more visible because they have multiplied in number and influence, ever more involved because they increasingly encompass literate activity, and ever more contested because they embody values and aspirations. For these reasons (and a few others), technological contexts have moved toward the center of disciplinary conversations and encouraged people to think expansively and sometimes untraditionally about their practices and perspectives. The 20th Penn State Conference on Rhetoric and Composition will address this ongoing state of affairs. Its theme will be "Rhetorics and Technologies."

The conference theme operates out of three fundamental assumptions about the nature of technological contexts. First, technological contexts encompass more than just physical devices like computers and books. They also involve systems, techniques, and methods for rationalizing work and society. As Walter Ong taught, language itself is something of a technology. Second, technological contexts are overdetermined: multiple forces and factors—historical, political, cultural, institutional, economic, and so on—shape the directions and priorities of technological projects. In other words, there is no one-to-one correspondence between technology and change, innovation, or social transformation. Third, and perhaps ironically, technological contexts bring to the surface human problems rather than technical problems, problems that inevitably draw in crucial questions of subjectivity, identity, agency, materiality, methodology, pedagogy, representation, and interdisciplinarity. As these assumptions suggest, technological contexts are decidedly rhetorical in character.

CALL FOR PAPERS

The program committee invites proposals for papers focusing on any of the questions listed below and on any subject that provides fresh perspectives on connections between rhetorics and technologies.

Submit abstracts via e-mail attachment to rhetoric2007@outreach.psu.edu

Paper submissions (500-word abstracts) will be accepted until February 15, 2007.


Instructions for Paper Submissions
  1. Abstracts should be 500 or fewer words.
  2. Abstracts should focus on one central theme.
  3. Abstracts should contain the following content sections:
    a.    Background or Context
    b.    Central Theme (questions you are trying to address)
    c.    Method of Approach or Inquiry
    d.    Conclusions
  4. Titles should be twenty-five or fewer words.
  5. All contributing authors should be identified.
During March 2007 you will receive notification regarding abstract acceptance. Important note: persons whose abstracts are accepted should register for the conference by June 1 or the abstract acceptance and opportunity to present may be canceled. 

Questions regarding proposals should be sent to:
Stuart Selber
Department of English
The Pennsylvania State University
E-mail: selber@psu.edu



Questions for Inquiry—Rhetorics and Technologies


The assumptions of the conference theme provide a conceptual backdrop for paper proposals on any number of questions for inquiry. These include, but certainly are not limited to, the following:

* What might history contribute to a rhetorical understanding of technological contexts writ broadly?

* How does rhetoric, as it has been traditionally mapped out, both illuminate and fail to illuminate the design and use of literacy technologies?

* How do issues of technology intersect with issues of identity, subjectivity, and agency? With race, class, gender, and ability? With other contemporary theory issues and categories?

* What do productive technologies look like in terms of their design? What specific contributions can rhetoricians hope to make to technological design practices?

* How are people currently working with technologies of production and reception? What, then, does it now mean to read and write? Teach and learn? Conduct and produce research and scholarship?

* What types of challenges accompany the task of integrating technologies into courses, programs, and institutions? Into spaces that involve nonacademic work?

* What are the ethical, legal, and professional questions raised by technology and its current contexts? How should our discipline think about such matters?

* What might be especially productive methods for studying and evaluating technology in context?


Quinnipiac University's First National Conference on Writing as Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines

Location: Hamden, CT
Date: November 17, 2006 to November 18, 2006
URL: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/wac.
Contact: Timothy Dansdill at Timothy.Dansdill@quinnipiac.edu
Description: Quinnipiac University's
First National Conference on
Writing as Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines

November 17-18, 2006
The College of Liberal Arts at Quinnipiac University
275 Mount Carmel Ave, Hamden, CT

Proposal Deadline: June 15, 2006

Quinnipiac University's First National Conference on Writing as Critical
Thinking Across the Disciplines invites proposals from all disciplines,
and especially from inter-curricular and cross-disciplinary teams, which
highlight the integration of Critical Thinking Research with the best
practices of teaching Writing and Rhetoric Across the Disciplines. Once
the exclusive province of Philosophy, over the past two decades Critical
Thinking has emerged across the curricula of many disciplines-Health
Sciences, Business, Legal Studies-and is taking on the status of a
"Movement" that our conference would like presenters and participants to
consider in parallel with the 30 year old Writing Across the Curriculum
Movement. Another, more useful analogy for imagining the actual
integration of these two "critical" movements might be that of a bridge
under construction. The analogy of a bridge in this case raises the
question that motivates this national conference: What are the
challenges in, and new pedagogical possibilities for, joining these two
far reaching movements in higher education? How can faculty across the
disciplines help one another build new bridges between cross-curricular
writing and critical thinking?

    
     Our key note speaker will be John Bean, professor of English at
Seattle University, where he holds the title of "Consulting Professor of
Writing and Assessment." The author of the widely used Engaging Ideas:
The Professor's Guide to Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning
in the Classroom, he has been active in the
writing-across-the-curriculum movement since its inception in the
1970's. He will present his most recent research assessing the critical
thinking skills of graduating seniors, and will draw connections between
critical thinking, argumentative writing, and rhetoric across the
disciplines.   

     We welcome individual, panel, and roundtable session proposals that
are grounded in the traditional principles and practices from Writing
Across the Curriculum and Writing in the Disciplines, as well as those
that employ more recent evolutions in critical reading and writing using
Electronic Communication and Digital Rhetoric. We are particularly
interested, however, in presentations that connect findings from the
last twenty years of research on Critical Thinking with the goals of
general educational reform that are now associated with the WAC
movement. 

     We invite colleagues to consider one of three different themes for
defining proposals and organizing presentations.

Theme A--Starting Out: Writing to Learn as Critical Thinking or Vice
Versa?
Theme B--Getting Across: Assessing Critical Thinking Strategies and 
                  Writing to Communicate Disciplinary Knowledge
Theme C--Going Beyond: New Directions in Critical Thinking and Writing
Across the Disciplines

To ensure broad participation, proposal for individual papers are
limited to 20 minutes and may be grouped into panels at the discretion
of the conference committee. Panel presentations are limited to 80
minutes, including 20 minutes for discussion.

Proposals will be read and email replies as to acceptance by August 15,
2006.

All proposals should include the following information:


Individual Proposals (300-500 words) should include: Description of the
paper topic and appropriate contact information.


Panel Proposals (300-500 words) should include: Description of the panel
topic, panel participants, and appropriate contact information.


Send proposals via email attachment to Timothy Dansdill, Assistant
Professor of English,
                   Timothy.Dansdill@quinnipiac.edu

Please Type QUWAC Conference Proposal in the Subject Window.

No Proposals will be Considered After June 15. 


Writing Development in Higher Education Conference

Location: Open University, Milton Keynes, UK
Date: November 11, 2006 to November 12, 2006
URL: http://kn.open.ac.uk/public/index.cfm?wpid=4285.
Contact: Mary R. Lea at m.r.lea@open.ac.uk
Description:

The 11th WDHE Conference: Challenging Institutional Priorities, May11-12, offers a forum for participants to explore the implications of developing approaches to supporting student writing against the backdrop of wider HE and institutional agendas.

Keynote Speakers:

Rob Pope Professor of English Studies, Oxford Brookes University

Roz Ivanic Professor of Linguistics in Education, University of Lancaster

Leverhulme Debate with Sally Mitchell, Thinking & Writing Project, Queen Mary, University of London, and David Russell Professor of Rhetoric & Professional Communication, Iowa State University

Higher education is in a constant state of flux, resulting in changing and increasing demands being made upon universities and their academic and learning support staff. Universities are required to respond to widening participation agendas at the same time as making sure that the curriculum prepares students for the workplace in what is commonly referred to as the ‘knowledge economy’.

At the same time, outcomes and skills based education has taken precedence over other approaches to delivering the curriculum. Funding initiatives around teaching and learning are increasingly linked to these agendas and to the implementation of new technologies.

Although student writing is at the very heart of many of these its significance for learning is often overlooked and sidelined in terms of the mainstream curriculum.

WDHE 2006 will provide participants with the opportunity to explore how they can best support student writing in this present climate; an environment where initiatives around student writing often appear marginalised in the face of other institutional priorities and policies. It will also address the question of how to support students in the light of research in the field which continues to provide evidence for the complex relationship between writing and learning and the construction of disciplines and subjects.

 Important dates and deadlines
  • Deadline for submission of abstracts: November 15, 2005
    (see the 
    CALL for Papers page)
  • Notification of accepted abstracts: End of January 2006
  • Registration opens November 2005
  • Deadline for presenters to register: March 2006





2006 Assessment Institute in Indianapolis

Location: Indianapolis
Date: September 6, 2006 to September 6, 2006
URL: http://www.planning.iupui.edu/51.html.
Contact: Trudy W. Banta at tbanta@iupui.edu
Description: 2006 Assessment Institute in Indianapolis

October 29-31, 2006

The Westin Indianapolis

NEW THIS YEAR

Track Plenary Sessions & Workshops Emphasizing Assessment in:

 *        Civic Engagement, keynote by Barbara A. Holland
 *        ePortfolios, keynote by Kathleen Blake Yancey
 *        Faculty Development, keynote by Barbara E. Walvoord
 *        First-Year Experiences, keynote by Betsy O. Barefoot
 *        Student Development and Diversity, keynote by George D. Kuh

CONTINUING OUR TRADITIONS - We will present sessions emphasizing:

 *        Accreditation
 *        Assessment in Major Fields
 *        Assessment in General Education
 *        Community College Assessment

 In-depth Learning Opportunities with Scholars/Practitioners for all
 Faculty and Administrators

 Pre-Institute Workshops and Best Practices Fair

 Concurrent Workshops with leaders of successful assessment initiatives
 including:

 *        Thomas A. Angelo

 *        Trudy W. Banta

 *        Peter T. Ewell

 *        George D. Kuh

 *        Jeffrey A. Seybert

 CONSULT OUR WEBSITE:  http://www.planning.iupui.edu/51.html

 Or contact:       Trudy W. Banta
 Professor of Higher Education
 Senior Advisor to the Chancellor for
 Academic Planning and Evaluation
 Planning and Institutional Improvement
 Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
 355 N. Lansing Street, AO 140
 Indianapolis, IN  46202-2896
 Phone:  317.274.4111; Fax:  317.274.4651
 Email:  tbanta@iupui.edu
or

 Karen E. Black
 Director of Program Review
 Phone:  317.274.4111; Fax:  317.274.4651
 kblack@iupui.edu

Computers and Writing 2006

Location: Lubbock, Texas
Date: May 25, 2006 to May 28, 2006
URL: http://computersandwriting.org/cw2006.
Description:

Call For Proposals

Computers and Writing 2006 invites proposals for its May 25-28 conference. Hosted by Texas Tech University, the theme for the program is “Still Making Knowledge on the Frontier(s).” To submit proposals by January 15 for workshops, poster sessions, round table discussions, and individual or panel presentations, please see http://computersandwriting.org/cw2006.

While each year brings new research questions to the field, scholars and instructors still wrestle with many enduring issues. In addition to our quest to understand more about writing, writing instruction, and training new writing instructors, we wish to examine the use of datagogy in our field, the continued search for valid and reliable visual and socially-networked writing environment assessment methodologies, the exploration of communication through wireless and mobile technologies, the developed integration of open-source tools with system-wide electronic performance support system services, and the increased influence of technical communication on composition. We encourage submissions in response to the following: 

  • What have we learned about writing and writing instruction? How are we preparing others to teach in light of what we've learned? How are we disseminating our research results?
  • How are interface and interaction design important to computers and writing?
  • Where are wide-scale teaching and assessment tools taking us? Consider ePortfolios, database delivery systems, social network tools, integration with publisher companion Web site resources, online warehouses, and powerful search engines and specialized search routines.
  • Where and what knowledge is being created, and how is it being recognized? Consider issues such as copyright/copyleft, intellectual property, online education, and promotion and tenure.
  • How are research techniques to study newly technologized contexts being adapted/created?
  • How are we resisting/embracing applications/ideologies from other disciplines For instance, how are we operating in the "corporate (or corporatized) university?
  • How are we making room in our disciplines for new ideas and new voices?
  • What is (or should be) the relationship between technical communication and composition?
  • Which technological tools have we adopted out of necessity, and what are our current choices?
  • How has the use of technology in writing centers contributed to knowledge making in writing instruction? What are some of the new frontiers we're exploring and what are we learning from them?

We look forward to seeing you in Lubbock May 25-28.

- The TTU Technical Communication and Rhetoric Faculty and Graduate Students


Eighth International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

Location: Clemson, South Carolina
Date: May 18, 2006 to May 20, 2006
URL: http://www.clemson.edu/pearce/wac2006.
Contact: Art Young and Kathi Yancey at wac2006-L@clemson.edu
Description: Eighth International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference
May 18-20, 2006
The Conference Center & Inn at Clemson University
Clemson, South Carolina
        
Proposal Deadline: September 26, 2005. 

We are delighted to announce the Eighth International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference. We encourage proposals from all disciplines and from cross-disciplinary teams on a wide range of topics of interest to faculty, graduate students, and administrators at two- and four-year colleges. These topics include:

· WAC: Writing Across the Curriculum
· WID: Writing in the Disciplines
· CAC: Communication Across the Curriculum, which includes oral, visual, digital, and written communication
· ECAC: Electronic Communication Across the Curriculum. 

We invite proposals of five session types: individual presentations; full panels; roundtable sessions; poster sessions; and pre-conference workshops. In addition, we invite submission of proposals in the following broad categories:
     
Theme A: Teaching:  Using WAC, WID, CAC, or ECAC in Teaching Disciplinary Courses

Theme B: Research, History, Theory, and Contemporary Practice

Theme C: Program Design, Implementation, Administration, Outreach, and Assessment

Theme D: WAC, CAC, and Technology
 

Theme E: The Politics of WAC 

Theme F: Cross Thematic and Other Related Topics


For program proposal forms and additional conference information, please see our website <www.clemson.edu/pearce/wac2006>. Please also feel free to contact the conference planners at wac2006-L@clemson.edu or fax, 864.656.1846.  You may also contact the conference co-directors: Art Young (864.656.3062) or Kathi Yancey (864.656.5394), Department of English, 616 Strode Tower, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0523.

MAWCA 2006

Location: Annapolis, Maryland
Date: April 8, 2006 to April 8, 2006
URL: http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/mawca/conf_2006.htm.
Description: The Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association is pleased to announce its
17th annual conference April 8, 2006 at the United States Naval Academy
in Annapolis, Maryland.

Proposals will be accepted December 20, 2005. Please see our website for
online submission details and registration information:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/mawca/conf_2006.htm

*Journeying Through Text and Talk*


"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference."

Robert Frost

Writers journey through words; however, the journey is often not easy,
and the path is not always clear. Tutors, then, can be helpful guides,
providing assistance as writers work through the writing process. For
MAWCA 2006, we invite you to reflect on the multiple paths and diverse
directions that writing centers—and writing tutorials—can take. We
invite tutors, directors, and students to extend the metaphor of
journeying in many different ways:

* What are the well-traveled and less-traveled writing center roads?
* What is the role of talk in our work—both f2f and online? How do we
talk to clients? How do we talk among ourselves? How doe we talk to
those new to or outside our field?
* In what ways do our paths intersect to form a community of tutors
and/or writers?
* How can we effectively guide tutors on this journey of assisting writers?
* How do we create and/or share writing center theory and practice?
* As our journey becomes increasingly virtual, what changes? What is
gained or lost?
* What other metaphors can we use to describe and discuss what we do?

We are honored to feature Dr. James Inman as our keynote speaker. James
Inman teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in English at the
University of Tennessee Chattanooga. His writing center publications
include the co-edited collection Taking Flight with OWLs: Examining
Electronic Writing Center Work and the co-edited CD-ROM The OWL
Construction and Maintenance Guide,
as well as articles and reviews in
Writing Center Journal and Writing Lab Newsletter.


NEWCA 2006

Location: Amherst, New Hampshire
Date: April 8, 2006 to April 8, 2006
URL: http://www.newca.findmefaster.com/.
Description:

NEWCA

Northeast Writing Center Assocations

Making Connections: Conversations Among Communities

Souhegan High School, Amherst, New Hampshire
Saturday, April 8, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm

The Northeast Writing Center Association (NEWCA) is a regional affiliate of the International Writing Center Association (IWCA).  This annual conference is a full-day event providing writing center tutors, staff, faculty, administrators, and scholars with opportunities to interact with colleagues from other writing centers in the Northeast.  This conference includes workshops, panel presentations, and presentations on writing center research, plus a luncheon, and a pre-conference open-mic coffeehouse.  During the conference, NEWCA members will also vote on issues relevant to the functioning and governance of the association.  We look forward to seeing you there.

Conference Theme: "Making Connections: Conversations Among Communities"

Writing centers are proliferating in many different kinds of contexts—universities, two-year colleges, technical colleges and universities, high schools, middle schools, community centers, as well as virtual spaces.  The NEWCA 2006 conference, hosted for the first time by a high school, highlights this diversity.  This year’s conference will explore the conversations that take place within, through, among and in relation to writing centers.  Sessions will explore the many kinds of conversations that are part of writing center work, as well as the many communities that are intertwined with writing centers, within academia and in the community at large.    


Conference on Writing, Teaching, and Technology, K-College

Location: University of Massachusetts Amherst; Amherst, MA
Date: April 7, 2006 to April 8, 2006
URL: http://www.umass.edu/english/WTTConf.
Contact: Corry Colonna and/or Mary Wilson at wttconf@english.umass.edu
Description:

Conference Registration Now Open!  Please see www.umass.edu/english/WTTConf for forms and details.

New technology is providing new venues for writers and for teachers of writing, offering us all exciting possibilities and different perspectives on what writing is, can, or should be. As tech-savvy students post blogs and teachers engage with new software to organize their courses and share student writing, technology challenges our definitions and practices of writing instruction. The Conference on Writing, Teaching, and Technology, K-College, will be an opportunity for teachers from all grade levels to share ideas, methods, and projects on integrating technology effectively into the writing classroom, and to address the question, “How has technology affected writing and the teaching of writing?”


Featured Speakers:

Kathleen Yancey, Professor of English, Florida State University

Charles Moran, Professor Emeritus of English, The University of Massachusetts Amherst


About the Conference

The rapid development of computer capabilities is providing new venues for writing, for people of all ages: personal web pages, web diaries, and blogs make it possible for people to write and share their work around the globe. As technology facilitates writing, it also challenges our very notion of writing. Writers can compose not only with words, but also with images and sound. Software programs are moving far beyond spell-checking; some are being marketed claiming to evaluate writing. Finally, technology also provides new opportunities for teaching writing (for example, electronic writing portfolios; software, like WebCT, that organizes courses and facilitates sharing of drafts; distanced education platforms). This conference aims to allow teachers from different backgrounds and with different interests to share methods, ideas, and projects for using technology effectively in the writing classroom.

Questions we hope to consider include: What has technology done to the concept of writing? To what extent does technology privilege print and graphics over oral and aural modes of communication? What am I to teach when I teach “writing”? What are effective ways to incorporate existing and emerging technologies into writing instruction to serve specific teaching ends? How might new technologies assist in assessment? How do I assess software programs? What are the costs of differential access to technology?


Conference Topics Include:

  • Evolving Practices for Evaluating and Citing Online Source Materials
  • Technological Tools for Re-Sensing Writing
  • Assigning and Judging Writing in the Digital Age
  • Making Connections: Creating a Virtual Writing Community
  • Teaching Photographic, Audio, and Video Composition: Motivating Theories and Practical Concerns
  • Teachers as Travel Guides: Surrendering the Role of "Expert" in Computerized Composition Classrooms
  • Changing Literacies
  • Using IMovie to Develop Students as Collaborators in Writing Groups
  • Shaping a Writing Community for Faculty and Students: How a Program Portal and Interactive Class Websites Reflect, Reinforce, and May Alter Our Teaching Practices in Freshman English
  • If Not Books, Then What: The Future of Publisher-Supplied Pedagogical Tools 
  •  K-12 Roundtable Discussion 
  •  Digital Storytelling: A Cross-Grade Claymation Adventure
  • Online Essay Assessments (Graded by Humans): Uses, Benefits, & Designs
    Visual Literacy
  • Weblogs and the Writing Classroom

Questions about the conference?  See our website for more details (www.umass.edu/english/WTTConf), or email Mary Wilson and Corry Colonna, Conference Co-Coordinators, at wttconf@english.umass.edu.


ECWCA Conference

Location: Alliance, Ohio
Date: March 9, 2006 to March 11, 2006
URL: http://www.ecwca.org .
Description:

The Work at Hand: Investigation, Articulation, and Labor in the Center
The 28th Conference of the East Central Writing Centers Association

March 9-11, 2006
Mount Union College
Alliance, OH

One of the most persistent problems in writing center work is enabling
our institutions and campus communities to understand what we do, why we
do it, and how we do it-at least enough to trust the work we are doing.
As we struggle for this collective understanding, which can extend to
our sense of in/exclusion in/from the academic community and our sense
of how our work is valued there, we also fight for autonomy and
self-determination that other academic entities seldom enjoy. At times,
our field can seem at odds with itself in pursuing these seemingly
conflicting goals of inclusion and autonomy, and at a loss for
articulating in meaningful ways for others how we know what we do is
working. Somehow, we know that our work is very different and needs to
be so; others have not always understood that.

We can make this better-our field's emphasis on collaboration is one of
its greatest gifts. The question is how. This conference theme takes a
stab at that question with two premises that should be familiar to most
writing center supporters: we understand better when we communicate what
we know & how we know it, and we know more when we work through our
ideas with others. When we work toward deeper understanding of our own
work, together, we also facilitate greater depth in explaining and
exploring what we do with others. This conference is designed to provoke
and share that depth of understanding.

Potential conference topics should interest tutors as well as others,
and can include but are not limited to:

Assessment
Writing center research work
Making tutoring work with your course load/major
Keeping work as a tutor manageable
Working with specific groups
Working with challenging peers/colleagues/writers
The intra-institutional work of the writing center
Integrating the working responsibilities/roles of the Writing Center
Director
Working out (of) the history of (the) writing center(s)
Importing/exporting writing center work
Best practices/what works
Working with technology
The labor and workers in writing centers

Deadlines are as follows:

Proposals: Extended to December 15th, 2005
Early registration ends: February 1st, 2006

Please visit www.ecwca.org for further details.


South Central Writing Centers Association 2006 Annual Conference

Location: Little Rock, Arkansas
Date: February 23, 2006 to February 25, 2006
URL: http://www.scwca.net,.
Contact: Allison Denman Holland
Description:

South Central Writing Centers Associaiton

 2006 Call for Proposals


Proposal deadline: November 15

 

Please join the South Central Writing Centers Association for “Looking Back, Reaching Forward: Writing Centers as the Center of WAC,” the 2006 annual conference hosted by the University of Arkansas at Little Rock on February 23-25. Dr. Joan Mullin, director of the WAC initiative for the College of Liberal Arts at University of Texas-Austin, former co-editor of The Writing Center Journal, and past president of IWCA, is the keynote speaker.

 

The nature of writing center work offers multiple opportunities for WAC initiatives, even in academic environments where WAC programs are not formalized.  Historically, writing centers have been challenged to prove their effectiveness in improving writing across the curriculum in formal and informal ways. Our responses have been flexible, innovative, creative and sometimes unique to individual campus circumstances, while retaining unique writing center identities.  Over time, writing center leaders have gained wider professional and academic recognition, tutors have experience enhanced training, and writing centers are now recognized as vital elements of campus-wide learning communities.

 

Share your experiences with and dreams for writing centers and WAC. Please join us for a lively, informative conference about our collective work.  Suggestions for proposal topics are located under Call for Papers at www.scwca.net, the SCWCA website, along with Proposal and Registration forms and other conference information. The deadline for proposal submissions is November 15.  Acceptance notifications will be sent out by December 30.

 

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to

 

§       unique writing center techniques developed to meet disciplinary needs

§       problems faced by writing centers when organized WAC programs do not exist on their campuses

§       methods developed to build mini-WAC between writing centers and academic programs

§       writing center administrator initiatives to create WAC environments on campuses where WAC is not formalized

§       methods of tutor training which enhance working with writers from across the curriculum

§       individual writing center histories which explore and demonstrate change and adaptation to meet WAC needs

§       creative tutor initiatives which enhance WAC services

§       writing center internal and/or external training initiatives used to reach individual faculty across the curriculum

§       the effectiveness of writing center theory in improving writing across the disciplines on campus

§       success stories of WAC and writing center collaboration

§       cautionary tales of misadventures in WAC and the effects on writing center work across the campus

§       creative, innovative problem-solving techniques for writing centers not yet involved in WAC initiatives

 


Questions?  Contact:
Allison Denman Holland, Conference Chair
University Writing Center--SUB 116
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
2801 South University
Little Rock, AR  72202
Office: (501) 569-8311 Fax: (501) 569-8279


Southeastern Writing Center Association 2006 Annual Conference

Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Date: February 16, 2006 to February 18, 2006
URL: http://uwp.aas.duke.edu/wstudio/swca/.
Description:

The Southeastern Writing Center Association is pleased to announce an early call for proposals for its 2006 annual conference, February 16-18: “Let’s Research: Gathering Evidence to Support Writing Center Work.” Co-hosted by the University of North Carolina and Duke University, the conference venue is at the historic Carolina Inn in Chapel Hill. Neal Lerner, co-editor of the Writing Center Journal and co-author of The Allyn and Bacon Guide to Peer Tutoring, is the keynote speaker.

 

As writing centers, we are increasingly called upon to demonstrate our effectiveness and catalog our contributions to the communities we serve.  While our institutions vary widely, we share a common need to investigate our theory and practice and convey our knowledge in measurable, convincing ways. We invite you to submit a proposal on any aspect of writing center work and to think creatively about what kinds of problems you’d like to solve, knowledge you’d like to gain, theories you’d like to investigate, and practices you’d like to test or measure.  The early submission deadline is June 1 (acceptance notification by July 1) and the regular submission deadline is Sept. 15 (acceptance notification by Oct. 15). The conference web site is http://uwp.aas.duke.edu/wstudio/swca/.


23rd National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing

Location: Sweetland Writing Center, Ann Arbor, MI
Date: February 7, 2006 to February 7, 2006
URL: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/swc/ncptw/.
Description:

The 23rd National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing will convene to address issues of power and authority as they play out in the specialized practice of peer tutoring. Participants will consider a variety of perspectives on how tutors can best balance their roles as authority and facilitator, as well as how, on an institutional level, writing centers negotiate the tension between personal and academic literacy.

Call For Papers: Gayle Morris Sweetland Writing Center at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, seeks proposals for 75-minute sessions that consider practical, historical and theoretical aspects of the theme of authority in the writing center. We emphasize tutor-led, active presentations providing the opportunity for audience interaction and/or discussion. Applicants should submit a one-page proposal (250 words) and an abstract (50 words) no later than April 10, 2006. Proposals should include the type (workshop, panel, individual) and length of presentation, name, affiliation and email address of presenter(s), and title of the presentation. Send these materials as attachments to NCPTW06@umich.edu.


On the Road to Sustainable Excellence: Communicating across the Curriculum

Location: The American University in Cairo, Egypt
Date: November 11, 2005 to November 12, 2005
URL: http://www.aucegypt.edu/academic/WPconference/.
Contact: Nagwa Kassabgy at nagwa@aucegypt.edu
Description:

The conference provides a forum to discuss ways in which communication skills (written, oral, visual, digital and numerical) are used to enhance the learning process in the disciplines. Competence in the various modes of communication empowers students to explore, assess and create knowledge, as well as bear the responsibility for its ethical dissemination. Thus, we hope, through interdisciplinary dialog and sharing of teaching/learning experiences, to foster a learning community where passion for knowledge is inspired, rhetorical skill promoted and civic responsibility instilled. Pedagogical issues that affect engagement, creativity, integrity, and evaluation are also addressed. Learning excellence, in all disciplines, can be cultivated and sustained.

Keynote Speaker:
Chris Anson, Director of the Campus Writing and Speaking Program at North Carolina State University

http://www.home.earthlink.net/~theansons/Portcover.html

 
Discipline-specific or cross-disciplinary areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Writing across the curriculum
  • Visual literacy across the curriculum
  • Oral communication across the curriculum
  • Electronic communication across the curriculum
  • Numeracy across the curriculum
  • Critical thinking across the curriculum
  • Innovation and creative thinking across the curriculum
  • Collaborative learning and peer tutoring across the curriculum
  • Information literacy across the curriculum
  • Research and documentation styles across the curriculum
  • Alternative assessment across the curriculum
  • Academic Integrity across the curriculum
  • Civic engagement across the curriculum
  • Emotional intelligence across the curriculum
  • Spiritual intelligence across the curriculum
  • Program evaluation across the curriculum
  • Partnerships across the curriculum
  • Cross cultural issues across the curriculum
  • EFL across the curriculum
  • Professional development across the curriculum

Call for Papers:

To submit a proposal you need the following:

o       A completed proposal form

o       A 250-word abstract

o       A 50-word summary for the program book

o       A 35-word biography for each presenter


Deadline for proposals:
31 July 2005. 

For further information contact the organizers at cacprop@aucegypt.edu

 

Conference Fees:

  • Non-Resident Participants:                                  50 USD
  • Resident Participants (local and foreign):          50 L.E.
  • AUC community:                                                   Free admission

MAWPA/CWA Conference

Location: St. Louis
Date: October 27, 2005 to October 28, 2005
Contact: Donna Strickland at StricklandDG@missouri.edu
Description: The Mid-America Writing Program Administrators (a regional affiliate of
the National Council of Writing Program Administrators) and the Missouri
Colloquium on Writing Assessment are pleased to invite proposals for
sessions at their second annual joint meeting, to be hosted by St. Louis
University and Fontbonne University in St. Louis on October 27-28, 2005.

This is an opportunity for writing instructors, writing program
administrators, anyone concerned with writing assessment, and others to
meet in a friendly, supportive environment to discuss the issues that
affect us as both scholars and administrators.  Such issues might
include, but are not limited to:

*    Assessment
*    Faculty Development
*    First-year Writing Programs
*    WAC/WID Initiatives
*    Writing and General Education
*    Basic Writing
*    Portfolios
*    Connections with Public Schools
*    Program Coherence
*    State-mandated Assessment
*    Curriculum Reform
*    Contingent Faculty
*    Research Methodologies & Opportunities

We especially encourage proposals for interactive workshops.  Proposals
should be submitted to Donna Strickland (StricklandDG@missouri.edu) no
later than August 15, 2005.  Please include a description of about 100
words and indicate your desired format (individual speaker, panel,
interactive workshop, etc.).  Presenters will be notified by September
6.

Information about conference location and housing is forthcoming.  In
the meantime, questions can be directed to Donna Strickland or Marty
Townsend (TownsendM@missouri.edu).

2006 NEWCA Conference

Location: Amherst, NH
Date: October 23, 2005 to October 23, 2005
Contact: Leslie Van Wagner at lvanwagner@rivier.edu
Description:

Call for Proposals

Northeast Writing Centers Association (NEWCA)

2006 Annual Conference

 

Proposals due by December 20, 2005. 

 

Saturday, April 8, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm at Souhegan High School, in Amherst, New Hampshire 

 

Plus a pre-conference Open-Mic Coffeehouse on Friday, April 7, 6 to 9 pm at the Dion Center Reception Room, Rivier College, Nashua, New Hampshire

 

About this Conference:

 

The Northeast Writing Center Association is a regional affiliate of the International Writing Centers Association (IWCA).  This annual conference is a full-day event providing writing center tutors, staff, faculty, administrators, and scholars with opportunities to interact with colleagues from other writing centers in the Northeast.  This conference includes workshops, panel presentations, and presentations on writing center research, plus a luncheon, and a pre-conference open-mic coffeehouse.  During the conference, NEWCA members will also vote on issues relevant to the functioning and governance of the association.  We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Keynote Speaker: Professor Cinthia Gannett

 

Cinthia Gannett is an Associate Professor of Writing at Loyola College in Maryland where she directs the Writing Across the Curriculum Program and the Loyola Writing Center.  Previously, she was the Director of Writing Across the Curriculum and the Connors Writing Center at the University of New Hampshire. Her research interests include bringing translation theory to WAC and writing center work, exploring writing in the disciplines, currently Communication Sciences and Disorders and Zoology, and keeping the histories of writing programs alive, particularly through the creation of local archives. 

 

Theme: “Making Connections: Conversations among Communities” 

 

Writing centers are proliferating in many different kinds of contexts—universities, two-year colleges, technical colleges and universities, high schools, middle schools, community centers, as well as virtual spaces. The NEWCA 2006 conference, hosted for the first time by a high school, highlights this diversity. This year’s conference will explore the conversations that take place within, through, among and in relation to writing centers. We invite proposals that explore the many kinds of conversations that are part of writing center work, as well as the many communities that are intertwined with writing centers, within academia and in the community at large.    

 

Proposals for panel presentations, roundtable discussions, individual presentations or interactive workshops are encouraged.  Presentations may address topics such as:

 

  • The complexities of centers in motion—changes in vision, technology, administration, place, and/or alliances
  • Facilitating effective dialogues between tutors and writers (and avoiding monologues)
  • Creating alliances/collaborations between writing centers and other communities, either within the same institution (i.e. a library) or in the community at large (i.e. a literacy program)
  • Tensions (both productive and impeding) between writing centers and other communities within an institution
  • Working with writers from various communities, such as culturally and linguistically diverse writers, differently-abled writers, or writers with diverse disciplinary orientations
  • WAC/WC connections and disconnections

We encourage submissions from professional staff, administrators, and faculty affiliated with writing centers at all educational levels.  Moreover, since peer tutors constitute more than half of the participants at the conference, we strongly encourage proposals from peer tutors.

 

We encourage submissions from professional staff, administrators, and faculty affiliated with writing centers at all educational levels.  Moreover, since peer tutors constitute more than half of the participants at the conference, we strongly encourage proposals from peer tutors.

 

Your proposed panel, discussion, presentation, or workshop should actively involve the audience.  In addition to interactive panels, we invite proposals that present original scholarship, such as presentations developed for courses or for future publication. 

 

Proposal Guidelines

 

In order to allow for broad participation, individual papers will be limited to 15 minutes and panel presentations will be limited to 75 minutes. 

 

Please include the following information in your proposal:

 

  • Proposer’s name, position (i.e. tutor, director, etc), institution, institutional or home address, telephone number, and email address
  • Presenters’ names with title and contact information, as above
  • Title of presentation, one-page description of presentation, and a 75-word abstract for inclusion in the conference program
  • Type of session (panel presentation, roundtable discussion, individual presentation, interactive workshop)
  • Specific audiovisual and technical requests

Proposal Submission

 

Submit your proposal by December 30, 2005, either electronically or by mail. 

 

  • Electronic submissions should be sent as an MS Word attachment or included in the body of the email to Leslie Van Wagner at lvanwagner@rivier.edu. 
  • Mailed submissions should be sent to: Leslie Van Wagner, Director, Writing Center, Rivier College, 420 South Main Street, Nashua, NH, 03060  

If you need more information about submitting proposals, please contact Leslie Van Wagner at lvanwagner@rivier.edu or (603) 897-8580.

 


Reel Vision Filmmakers' Conference

Location: Tucson, AZ. USA
Date: October 22, 2005 to October 23, 2005
URL: http://www.reelinspiration.org.
Contact: Jana Segal at reelinspiration@hotmail.com
Description:

Reel Vision Filmmakers' Conference,  October 21-23, 2005, Radisson City Center Tucson.  World class instructors, including Linda Seger, help you realize your vision. Industry professionals, such as Distribution rep Mark Steven Bosko, deliver cutting edge tools to market your film or script. Register by Sept. 21st $85. ($55 for students.)  Pre-register after that date: $100. www.reelinspiration.org, reelinspiration@hotmail.com, 520-325-9175.


IWCA/NCPTWE 2nd Joint Conference: "Navigating the Boundary Waters: The Politics of Idenity, Location, and Stewardship"

Location: Minneapolis, MN
Date: October 19, 2005 to October 23, 2005
URL: http://www.writingcenters.org .
Contact: Frankie Condon at fvcondon@stcloudstate.edu
Description:

The International Writing Centers Association and the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing are pleased to announce their 2nd joint conference. "Navigating the Boundary Waters: The Politics of Identity, Location, and Stewardship" October 19 - 23, 2005.  The conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Minneapolis, Minnesota and hosted by the Midwest Writing Centers Association.

The Conference Theme

Minnesota's Boundary Waters stretch along the border of the United States and Canada and are one of the few remaining wilderness areas within the continental U.S.  Although they are renowned for their primeval and pristine beauty, the history of the Boundary Waters is one of bounty and exploitation, the meeting, clash, and contestation of cultures and nations, the fluidity of borders, and the struggle for adaptation, preservation, and sustainability.  This complex history challenges those of us who love the wilderness to examine who we are in relation to the region's natural and human history, what role we and our ancestors have played in that history, and how and to what extent we may better understand and sustain what is and transform what is to be.  

Historically positioned in the margins of the Academy, the writing center's experience is also one of both bounty and exploitation.  As a discipline, we have noted the heterogeneity of our institutions, organizations, philosophies and practices and, simultaneously, attempted to secure some measure of permanence and universality. We have sought a more stable sense of identity, institutional and disciplinary recognition, and an understanding of the ways in which the illusion of permanence co-opts as well as enables writing center theory and practice.

Like the history of the Boundary Waters, the story of writing centers has not yet been fully told.  We have not yet explored the degree to which this fluidity of identities challenges and channels tutors' and directors' relationships with student-writers, with one another, and with the institutions in which we are located.  We are only beginning to account for the impact of internationalism and globalization not only on individualized writing instruction, but also on the organizations in and through which we create our teaching, tutoring, directing, writing lives.  

Submitting Proposals

Writing Center tutors, directors, and staff are cordially invited to submit proposals that address one of the following questions or prompts.  You may also choose to develop and propose your own topic.  Proposals should include a fifty-word abstract and a 350-word description.  Please consider a variety of formats as you write your proposals including, but not limited to workshops and mini-workshops, facilitated discussions, roundtable discussions, panels, and/or presentation of research at the research fair. Questions about the 2005 IWCA/NCPTW Conference and Call For Papers may be directed to Frankie Condon at fvcondon@stcloudstate.edu. Proposals may be submitted online beginning February 1, 2005.  Please go to www.writingcenters.org and click on the 2005 conference link. Deadline for Submissions is March 1, 2005.

Starting Points

What follows are a list of questions or prompts that may be of use as you begin to develop a proposal. This is not intended to be an exhaustive or exclusive list, but to provide you with some potential points of entry into the conference theme.

Please be curious and critical, inventive and intellectual, creative and adventurous!

  • How or why might writing center directors and tutors engage in anti-racism work in their writing centers, their  institutions, and beyond?
  • In what ways do global Englishes challenge writing center directors and tutors to reconceive writing center  theory and transform practice?
  • How and in what ways do (or don't – and why?) class politics and class struggles inform writing center theory and practice?
  • How or why do identity politics and/or the politics of location shape writing center scholarship and practice?
  • How or why does gender shape writing center practice and perceptions of tutors' and directors' identities and why?
  • How are writing centers working in Tribal Colleges? Or, how are writing center directors and tutors at any  institution connecting and working with American Indian students?
  • How and in what ways are American Indian tutors and directors contributing to and challenging writing center theory and practice?
  • How, why, or could explorations of queer theory inform writing center theory and practice?
  • How or why might questions, theories or practices focusing on sustainability intersect with, inform, or argue against writing center theory or practice?
  • What might we mean by, or how might we talk, write and think about the ecology(ies) of writing centers? What are the connections between histories and ecologies?
  • What is Stewardship in writing center administration and/or of the discipline of writing center theory and  practice, and how might it be practiced? What are excess and / or simplicity in the context of writing center practice and theory, and in what ways might an understanding or exploration of these concepts churn the waters of Writing Center theory and practice?
  • Fluidity, turbidity, solidity, and damns: How might we most responsively and responsibly consider issues of  internationalism, nationalism, insularity, imperialism and the growth and development of the International Writing Centers Association
  • Navigating histories: who's steering this boat?  Why are canoes steered easier from the rear?
  • Just camping out – just passing through – settlers, explorers, and tourists in Writing Center histories.
  • How, why and toward what ends might writing center tutors, directors, and staff consider, intervene in, deploy  or critique metaphors of space, and the ideologies that inform them?


What is the New Rhetoric?

Location: University of Sydney, Australia
Date: September 2, 2005 to September 4, 2005
Contact: Susan Thomas at susan.thomas@arts.usyd.edu.au
Description:

Calls for Papers/Panels
What is the New Rhetoric?
University of Sydney, Australia
September 2-4, 2005


The University of Sydney proudly announces its first conference on Rhetoric: What is the New Rhetoric? Featuring keynote speaker Professor Andrea Lunsford of Stanford University, the conference will focus upon new directions in Rhetoric. Since the 1950’s, the definition of the "New Rhetoric" has expanded to encompass a variety of theories and movements, raising the question of how the "New Rhetoric" is defined and understood in the twenty-first century.

Papers and panels are invited on any aspect of the New Rhetoric, including (but not limited to) writing theory and pedagogy; histories and theories of rhetoric; interdisciplinary approaches to rhetoric, communication, and writing; the significance of rhetoric in both educational and professional sectors, and the interrelatedness of rhetoric and other disciplines.

Please send 300-500 word abstracts to Susan Thomas at susan.thomas@arts.usyd.edu.au by 25 February, including your text in the body of the e-mail rather than as an attached document.

Springtime in Sydney is magical, with plenty to see and do, so we encourage you to attend the conference and make a holiday of it.


Twelfth International Literacy Conference on Learning

Location: University of Granada, Spain
Date: July 11, 2005 to July 14, 2005
URL: http://www.LearningConference.com.
Contact: Prof. Mary Kalantzis
Description: TWELFTH INTERNATIONAL LITERACY CONFERENCE ON LEARNING
Faculty of Education,
University of Granada, Spain, 11-14 July 2005
http://www.LearningConference.com

The conference will address a range of critically important themes relating
to education today, including school and higher education. Main speakers
will include some of the world's leading thinkers and in the field of
education, as well as numerous paper, colloquium and workshop presentations
by researchers and practitioners.

Conference papers will be published in print and electronic formats in the
peer refereed International Journal of Learning. If you are unable to attend
the conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which
allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication in this
fully refereed academic journal, as well as access to the electronic version
of the conference proceedings. The deadline for the first round call for
papers is 1 October 2004. Proposals are usually reviewed within four weeks
of submission.

Full details of the conference, including an online call for papers form,
are to be found at the conference website.


WPA 2005: Writing as Writing Program Administrators

Location: Anchorage, Alaska
Date: July 3, 2005 to July 10, 2005
URL: http://moose.uaa.alaska.edu/wpa2005/ .
Contact: Shirley K. Rose at roses@purdue.edu
Description: WPA 2005: Writing as Writing Program Administrators

Anchorage, Alaska
Council of Writing Program Administrators
Summer Workshop, Institute, and Conference
July 3-10

Conference Theme and Program

Several months ago, a fellow WPA remarked that she was looking forward
to an upcoming leave from administrative work because she would have
"time for writing." Though we understand what she was saying, it's an
oddly ironic or paradoxical, if not nonsensical, statement. If a writing
program administrator doesn't have time for writing, who does?  As
writing program administrators, we spend, it may seem, nearly every
waking moment at our keyboards or with pen in hand. We can understand
what our fellow WPA was saying because we find ourselves in an academic
culture that has a sometimes very limited notion of what "counts" as
writing. Despite what we know about multiple genres of writing in
diverse rhetorical situations, when it comes to our own writing, we may
fail to appreciate just how much of it we do, how intellectually
demanding it is, or what's at stake in our choices of when, what, and to
whom to write as writing program administrators.

At the University of Alaska Anchorage in July 2005, plenary speakers,
mini-workshops leaders and participants, and concurrent session speakers
will be focusing on developing our understanding of the genres and
purposes of writing we do as writing program administrators, addressing
topics such as
writing with, for, and about the writing programs WPAs lead;
writing about the work of writing program administration;
writing research and scholarship that is informed by their work as WPAs;
writing with and for other WPAs; and
other issues of shared interest and concern to WPAs in programs for
first-year composition, professional writing, writing centers, and
writing across the curriculum.

Special Program Features:

In addition to plenary speakers and concurrent sessions addressing the
conference theme, the program will offer two special features.  Back by
popular demand, small-group breakout discussion sessions will follow
plenary talks, giving us a chance to keep the conversation going. New
this year, a series of professional development mini-workshops on
writing as a writing program administrator will be presented by
experienced WPAs. These mini-workshops will offered on Thursday and
Friday in the same time slots as concurrent sessions. Planned workshop
topics include
*       Writing effective program documents, memos, and reports;
*       Developing program-based inquiry into published scholarship;
*       Developing a writing program website;
*       Documenting the intellectual work of writing program
administration,  building a tenure/promotion case;
*       Making time to write: managing ideas, choosing priorities,
sustaining reflection;
*       and additional workshops in which participants work collectively
to draft and develop documents for the Council of Writing Program
Administrators (e.g., Standards for TA Training) or work collaboratively
to develop inter-institutional/ cross institutional grant proposals.
Be sure to point out these professional development opportunities to
your department chair or dean when you request funding! Though there
will be no additional charge for attending these mini-workshops,
participants will be asked to sign-up several months in advance to
enable planning for space and materials. Additional details, including
names of mini-workshop leaders and outlines of content will be provided
when complete information about conference registration is available at
http://moose.uaa.alaska.edu/wpa2005/

Call for Proposals

Proposals addressing the conference theme or other issues of interest to
WPAs are invited for concurrent sessions, including (1) full panels
involving several speakers addressing related topics, (2) individual
presentations to be grouped together by the program committee, and (3)
roundtables on a single topic. Proposals for multimedia presentations,
poster presentations, or other presentation formats are encouraged.
Review of proposals will begin October 15, 2004 and will continue until
the program is complete. Successful proposals will be acknowledged at
the earliest possible date. Proposals may be submitted at
http://moose.uaa.alaska.edu/wpa2005/

Planning Information

Conference: Official activities begin Thursday evening, July 7, at 5:30
PM with a welcome reception/orientation and conclude Sunday, July 10, at
10:00 AM after the Town Hall Meeting. Local organizers of the
conference, Trish Jenkins and Jeff White (University of Alaska -
Anchorage) will coordinate

Workshop: Workshop participants gather Sunday afternoon, July 3, and
meet all day every day through Thursday morning, July 7. Workshop
leaders Irwin (Bud) Weiser (Purdue University) and Lauren Fitzgerald
(Yeshiva University) will also be available for one-to-one consultations
in the evenings.

Assessment Institute: The day-long institute will be held on Thursday,
July 7, 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Lunch included.

Costs (for planning purposes only):
Housing (confirmed price): $25-35 per person/per night
Airfare (estimate): $200-600 roundtrip depending upon origin of flight
and date of booking
Conference Registration (estimate):$200 (includes 6 meals)-may be lower
Workshop Registration (estimate): $700 (includes 10 meals and 4 nights
housing)
Assessment Institute Registration (estimate): $125 (includes lunch)

For detailed up-to-date information about the conference, visit the
conference website at: http://moose.uaa.alaska.edu/wpa2005/
Conference Program Co-Chairs: Chris Anson, CWPA President, and Shirley
Rose, Vice-President;
Local Chairs: Trish Jenkins and Jeff White






The Second International AUCOXF Conference on Language and Linguistics

Location: The American University in Cairo, Cairo, Egypt.
Date: July 3, 2005 to July 3, 2005
URL: http://aucoxf@aucegypt.edu.
Contact: Dr. Zeinab Ibrahim at zeinabin@aucegypt.edu
Description: Deadline for Proposals: September 15, 2005. Requirements: 1. A completed proposal form 2. A 250-word summary for anonymous reviewers (document file) 3. A 50-word abstract for the program book (document file) 4. A 50-word abstract for each presenter (document file)

3rd International Conference of the European Association for the Teaching of Academic Writing

Location: Athens, Greece
Date: June 22, 2005 to June 24, 2005
URL: http://eataw2005.hau.gr/.
Contact: George Exadaktylos at eataw2005@hau.gr
Description:

3rd International Conference of the European Association for the Teaching of Academic Writing

 

"Teaching Writing On Line and Face to Face"

 

Hellenic American Union

The Writing Center

 

Athens, 22-24 June 2005

 

After two successful conferences (2001: The Netherlands, 2003: Hungary), the Writing Center of the Hellenic American Union (HAU) is organizing a conference with the topic "Teaching Writing On Line and Face to Face" in Athens,  22-24 June 2005.

 

It is the 3rd Conference of the European Association for the Teaching of Academic Writing (EATAW), an organization with an international membership of teachers, researchers and students of the subject of teaching of academic writing (http://eataw2005.hau.gr/).

 

The Writing Center is a service offered by the Hellenic American Union to its students and the general public. It offers advice and guidance on any writing problem, in English and in Greek (http://www.hau.gr/hau/el/services_writingcenter.html).

 

Writing program administrators, writing center staff, teachers, researchers and students interested in the teaching of academic writing are invited to attend and submit papers for presentation.

 

They will have the opportunity to:

  • listen to distinguished keynote speakers, such as L. Rienecker of the Univ. of Copenhagen, Prof Ann Raimes of the CUNY and Prof. C. Stephanidis of the Univ. of Crete
  • participate in presentations, workshops, and panel discussions on a variety of themes

 

Themes:

  • Technology in teaching and tutoring writing
  • Viability of Writing Centers: A free service or a free enterprise?
  • Organisational models for the teaching of academic writing
  • Cross-national and cross-cultural issues in the teaching of writing
  • Research & Innovation in the teaching and tutoring of writing

 

The working language of the Conference will be English.

 

For more information and registration,

 

George Exadaktylos

Hellenic American Union

Tel. + 30 210 36 80 018

?-mail: eataw2005@hau.gr

URL: http://eataw2005.hau.gr/


Computers and Writing 2005: New Writing and Computer Technologies

Location: Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
Date: June 16, 2005 to June 19, 2005
URL: http://CW2005.stanford.edu.
Description: Computers and Writing 2005, New Writing and Computer Technologies, will be held at Stanford University (Palo Alto, California) June 16 through June 19 of 2005.
 
The call for Proposals open at 8pm (PST) Tuesday, September 14 2004 until 8pm Thursday, October 28 2004.  To submit proposals for workshops, individual or panel presentations, please go to the conference’s main site at http://CW2005.stanford.edu.


When computers first came into the writing classroom, they were used mostly as word processing tools, enhancing the capabilities of typewriters by simplifying editing practices. Today, computers and their associated technologies are tools that strongly influence writing, facilitating substantive changes in writing, and perhaps then leading to new forms of writing. This conference will explore the changes in writing stemming from new technologies.

The conference theme, New Writing and Computer Technologies, asks us to think about changes in writing and argument that are resulting from the use of technology in crafting and delivering our written, oral and visual communication. Presentations might include, but are not limited to, explorations of the following questions:
  • Have linear forms of argumentation changed as a result of non-linear, hyper textual influences?
  • Have disenfranchised voices become more prominent, as was predicted with the advent of digital publishing and the promise of internet global spaces?
  • Are new mediums adapting to traditional forms of writing or vice versa?
  • Has interface design become a relevant area of study for composition?
  • Have online discussion tools changed the way we write and communicate?
  • What aspects of language and writing, if any, have changed as a result of computer mediated texts?
  • How has style, and delivery been affected by new mediums?
  • Are computers and software changing the content of our students's work?
  • How do instructors evaluate the work produced by students in these new mediums?

Northeast Writing Centers Association Conference 2005: "Writing Centers at the Crossroad: Envisioning Our Futures"

Location: Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York
Date: April 16, 2005 to April 17, 2005
Contact: Patricia Stephens at patricia.stephens@liu.edu
Description: NORTHEAST WRITING CENTERS ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE 2005
“Writing Centers at the Crossroads: Envisioning Our Futures”


LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
Saturday & Sunday, April 16 & 17

plus a Coffee House/Open Mic
Friday, April 15, 6:00-8:00
hosted by Stony Brook Manhattan
401 Park Avenue South (28th St.)
2nd Floor
New York, NY 10016


KEYNOTE SPEAKER: MURIEL S. HARRIS
Professor Emerita of English and Director of the Writing Lab, Purdue
University

Muriel Harris is Professor Emerita of English and Writing Lab Director, at
Purdue University. Although retired from Purdue (where she developed the
Writing Lab and, later, its OWL), she continues her interest, enthusiasm,
and advocacy for the world of writing centers, and she remains the editor
of the publication she founded in 1976 (that started as a few poorly
copied pages), The Writing Lab Newsletter. Her conference presentations,
book chapters, articles, and Teaching One-to-One: The Writing Conference,
all focus on the theory, administration, and pedagogy of one-to-one
tutoring centers. She has also authored The Prentice Hall Reference Guide
to Grammar and Usage
(soon to appear in a 6th edition) and The Writer's
FAQs.


Proposals due: December 27, 2004  

The Northeast Writing Centers Association (NEWCA) invites you to submit
proposals on the theme of Writing Centers at the Crossroads: Envisioning
Our Futures” for its Annual Conference to be held on April 16 and 17,
2005, at Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York.

We are seeking presentations that explore how writing centers are being
shaped and transformed (and perhaps even “re-formed”) for the future. As
higher education struggles with financial pressures, writing centers face
uncertain funding and institutional support. As the nation’s demographics
change, institutions are accepting more students of diverse ages,
cultures, and academic preparation that demand increasingly flexible
pedagogies and delivery methods. As writing centers continue to multiply
and evolve at colleges and universities, more and more secondary schools
are creating writing centers to enhance students’ educational experiences.
We want to hear how writing centers are meeting these challenges.

Proposals for panel presentations, roundtable discussions, individual
presentations or interactive workshops are encouraged. Presentations may
address topics such as:

Online writing centers
Online courses
Changing student demographics: non-traditional students, ESL students,
under-prepared students
Cross-institutional changes
Cross-curricular and writing-intensive courses
Tensions (both positive and negative) among writing programs, English
departments, and writing centers
Conflicting “visions” and “missions”: administrations vs. writing centers
Impact of local politics on writing programs and writing centers
Renaming / relocating writing centers

We encourage submissions from professional staff, administrators, and
faculty affiliated with writing centers at all educational levels.
Moreover, since peer tutors constitute more than half of the participants
at the conference, we strongly encourage proposals from peer tutors.

Your proposed panel, discussion, presentation, or workshop should actively
involve the audience. In addition to interactive panels, we invite
proposals that present original scholarship, such as presentations
developed for courses or for future publication.


PROPOSAL SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Please note that in order to allow for broad participation, papers will be
limited to 20 minutes and panel presentations will be limited to 80
minutes (i.e., up to three 20 minute papers with 20 minutes for
discussion). Individual papers which address comparable issues will be
grouped as panels by the conference committee.

Please include the following information in your proposal:
    Proposer’s name, position (tutor, director, etc.), institution, address,telephone
    number, and email address
    Presenters’ names with title and contact information, as above
    Title of presentation, one-page description of presentation, and a 75-word abstract
    for inclusion in the conference program
    Type of session (panel presentation, roundtable discussion, individual presentation,
    interactive workshop)
    Specific audiovisual and technical requests

To submit your proposal electronically:
    Send it as an MS Word attachment or include it in the body of the email.
    Email it to lvanwagner@rivier.edu by December 27, 2004.

To submit your proposal by land mail:
Mail it to:
    Leslie Van Wagner
    Director, Writing Center
    Rivier College
    420 South Main Street
    Nashua, NH  03060

If you need more information about submitting your proposal, contact
Leslie Van Wagner at (603)897-8580.

Registration:

Registration is limited to 175 participants and must be
received by April 8, 2005. The conference will be held regardless of
weather conditions and registration is non-refundable. If you cannot
attend, please send a colleague in your place. Lunch is guaranteed only
for those who have pre-registered. Direct conference questions to Patricia
Stephens: (718)488-1096; patricia.stephens@liu.edu. To register for the
2005 conference, complete the registration form below and mail the form
and a check* payable to NEWCA to:
            Patricia Stephens
            English Department
            Humanities Building, Fourth Floor
            Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus
            One University Plaza
            Brooklyn, NY  11201

*No cash registrations can be accepted.

Seven Hills Writers Conference

Location: Tallahassee, Florida, USA
Date: April 7, 2005 to April 9, 2005
URL: http://www.twaonline.org.
Contact: Anne Haw Holt at conference@tallahasseewriters.net
Description: Seven Hills Writers' Conference http://www.twaonline.org Thurs. evening. Apr 7, all day Fri 8, and Sat 9, 2005 - Tallahassee, FL. Seminars, panels and Workshops on the craft and business of writing, all genres. Meet with agents and editors from NY and CA. Keynote address by Leonard Pitts, Jr. e-mails for info: ahholt@ahholt.com --or-- conference@tallahasseewriters.net

South Central Writing Centers Association 15th Anniversary Celebration and Conference: Writing Centers and Time

Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Date: March 3, 2005 to March 5, 2005
Contact: J. Caprio at jcaprio@lsu.edu
Description:

South Central Writing Centers Association
15th Anniversary Celebration and Conference
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
March 3-5, 2005


                         WRITING CENTERS AND TIME

“This time, like all times, is a very good one if we but know what to do
with it.”
                                                Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Time does not change us. It just unfolds us.”    Max Frisch

“Time is a versatile performer. It flies, marches on, heals all wounds,
runs out and will tell.”  Franklin P. Jones

"Time is the fire in which we burn."  Gene Roddenberry

"Everything happens to everybody sooner or later if there is time enough."
                                          George Bernard Shaw

“Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.”   Douglas Adams

“In a minute there is time/ For decisions and revisions which a minute will
reverse.”
                                          J. Alfred Prufrock

If you believe in the Japanese proverb, “Time spent laughing is time spent
with the gods,” then join us for the South Central Writing Center
Conference. You’ll enjoy creative energy, laughter and learning with
writing center colleagues.

            *******************************************
Keynote speaker is Dr. Muriel Harris, Professor Emerita of English, Purdue
University, founder of the Purdue Writing Lab in 1976, originator and
editor of the Writing Lab Newsletter in 1976, founder of the Purdue OWL,
and the author of numerous books and articles on writing center work,
teaching writing, writing centers and WAC programs.

We encourage all members of your writing center staff, especially
undergraduate and graduate students, to attend and present at this
conference. Presentations that address one or more of the following
questions, as well as those that invite audience participation and
discussion, are especially encouraged.  We are particularly interested in
your interpretations of the theme of time.

How has time dictated changes in your center?
How does time influence your decision-making in the center?
Can an investment of time compensate for the lack of finances? Whose
time and whose finances?
How can a center best allocate its resources in terms of time?
How has time affected theoretical approaches to writing center work?
How can we best use the time we have to prepare our consultants? To
work with writers?
How can a center keep pace in a time of rapidly changing technology,
campus policies, and curricula?
And is time really on your side, as the Rolling Stones claimed? Or
was Art Buchwald more accurate when he said, “Whether it's the best of
times or the worst of times, it's the only time we've got?”

Proposals should include a title, the names and contact information of all
presenters and a description of the presentation (250 words for
individuals; 500 words for panels, roundtables, and workshops) and a
50-word abstract. All presenters must be conference registrants.

Deadline for Proposals: All proposals must be emailed or postmarked by Dec.
15, 2004.

Electronic submissions should be sent to jcaprio@lsu.edu . If you prefer to
send your proposal by surface mail, send two copies to the LSU Writing
Center, B-18 Coates Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
ATTN: J. Caprio.


Southeastern Writing Centers Association Conference: "Writing as Learning: Understanding and Promoting Intellectual Growth and Critical Thinking in the Writing Center"

Location: Charleston, SC
Date: February 10, 2005 to February 12, 2005
URL: http://www.swca.us.
Contact: Trixie Smith at tgsmith@mtsu.edu
Description:
Call for Proposals:  

In the 1970s as writing centers were developing across the country, Janet Emig argued that writing is a mode of learning. Since then this idea has been embraced by writing centers as well as WAC and WID programs around the globe. So now we, the Southeastern Writing Center Association, pause to ask how this idea is embraced as pedagogy and explored as ideology, especially within, through, and around the writing center.

 

We invite faculty, administrators, and students to explore this year’s theme, “Writing as Learning: Understanding and Promoting Intellectual Growth and Critical Thinking in the Writing Center,” and to submit proposals for individual and panel presentations, roundtable discussions, workshops, and poster sessions. Presentations that address one or more of the following questions, as well as those that invite audience participation and discussion, are especially encouraged:

 

§         How do we define critical thinking? How can we use writing as a tool to stimulate intellectual growth and critical thinking? How does the writing center foster such growth? How do we assess such growth?

 

§         How can the writing center impact cognition and behavior through significant learning experiences? How can we connect interactive writing/learning sessions, learning styles and writing conferences? How do we address motivation, organization, and self-directed learning in the writing center?

 

§         What is the role of the writing center and writing instructors in developing intellectual competence with issues of multicultural appreciation, social equity, communication and the complexities of their own lives?

 

§         How can we expand the boundaries and influence of the writing center program? How can we work with WAC/WID programs to implement effectively writing-to-learn techniques throughout the institution?

 

Proposals should include a title, the names and contact information of all presenters, the presentation format, a description of the presentation (250 words for individuals and posters; 500 words for panels and roundtables) and a 50-word abstract. We encourage you to submit proposals electronically at the SWCA Web site (www.swca.us). If necessary, proposals may be mailed to Trixie Smith, MTSU Department of English, P.O. Box 70, Murfreesboro, TN 37132 (postmarked by Oct 10). Questions should also be addressed to Trixie Smith at tgsmith@mtsu.edu. All presenters must be members of SWCA by the time of the conference.

 

Electronic proposals are due Oct 15, 2004.


Writing Research in the Making: An Interdisciplinary Conference

Location: Santa Barbara, California
Date: February 5, 2005 to February 6, 2005
URL: http://www.education.ucsb.edu/netshare/wrconf05.
Description: Writing Research in the Making: An Interdisciplinary Conference

February 5th and 6th, 2005

University of California,  Santa Barbara

Sponsored by:

Gevirtz Graduate School of Education    UCSB Writing Program   South Coast
Writing Project

Come join the conversation of researchers and researchers in the making
from California and across the nation.  Together we will explore the
critical importance of current research, how it is made, and how it is
developing the knowledge we need to advance teaching and practice.

To download the call for proposals and for more information please visit
the conference website:

http://www.education.ucsb.edu/netshare/wrconf05

or Email:  writing@education.ucsb.edu

Plenary Speakers

Charles Bazerman

Gevirtz Graduate School of Education
University of California, Santa Barbara

Deborah Brandt
Department of English
University of Wisconsin- Madison

Tom Fox
Department of English
Chico State University

Caroline Haythornthwaite
Graduate School of Library and
Information Science University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

George Hillocks
Department of English
University of Chicago

Susan Jarratt
Department of English and
Comparative Literature
University of California, Irvine

Paul LeMahieu
Director of Research
National Writing Project

Andrea Lunsford
Rhetoric and Writing Program
Stanford University

Karen J. Lunsford
Writing Program
University of California, Santa Barbara

Susan McLeod
Writing Program
University of California, Santa Barbara

Cezar Ornatowski
Department of Rhetoric and Writing Studies
San Diego State University

Paul Prior
Center for Writing Studies at the
University of Illinois,
Urbana-Champaign

Richard Sterling
Executive Director
National Writing Project

Tenth Annual Writers Conference at Penn

Location: University of Pennsylvania
Date: November 13, 2004 to November 14, 2004
URL: http://pennwritersconference.org.
Contact: Nadia Daniel at ndaniel@sas.upenn.edu
Description:
 

The 10th annual Writers Conference at Penn kicks off Saturday, November 13th at 9am with keynote speaker and award-winning author Paul Hendrickson.

The program, held at the
University of Pennsylvania, offers two days of a la carte workshops and master classes that can be selected individually. There is a one time registration fee of $25.

Saturday includes 54 workshops on fiction, non-fiction, screenwriting, freelancing, marketing, and business writing. You may select up to three of these 2 hour workshops which are priced at $65 each. Sign up for one, two or three based on your needs. At the end of the day, there will be a book signing and reception at The Penn Bookstore from
6pm to 7:30pm.

This year the conference is expanding to include 20 full-day Master Classes on Sunday, November 14 priced at $195. These intensive 4 hour courses involve advance submission of your
work and are limited to 8-10 students.

On Sunday X-Libris will be offering a self publishing seminar for $250 that includes the publishing of your book (this is a 50% underwriting off their standard self publishing package).  

For a full listing of courses, please visit www.pennwritersconference.org where you can either enroll online or download a PDF with the 75 workshops and master classes. If you need to enroll over the phone or are unable to download the course listing, please call 215.898.6493 and we'll be happy to help you.


Midwest Writing Centers Association Conference

Location: St. Cloud, Minnesota
Date: November 4, 2004 to November 6, 2004
URL: http://www.ku.edu/~mwca.
Description:

Midwest Writing Centers Association Conference

November 4 - 6, 2004 in St. Cloud, Minnesota. 

The conference theme is
"Talk Like a River: Discourses, Faith, Ethos, and Writing Centers."  The keynote speaker, Min-Zhan Lu, will discuss ideas from her current essay, "An Essay on the Work of Composition: Composing English against the Order of Fast Capitalism." (Forthcoming in College Composition and Communication, September 2004). Sessions include such topics as "Contemplating Areas of Uncertainty in Writing Center Practice," "Interrogations of Local History and Institutional Context in a Writing Center's Practice," "Connecting Service Learning and Writing Center Work," "Diversity Issues and Advocacy," "Encounters with World Englishes," and "Responding to the New London Group Call for Multiliteracies Pedagogy." Please join us for this exciting conference!

Conference and travel information and the Conference Registration Page can be found at www.ku.edu/~mwca.


The 21st Annual National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing

Location: Centenary College
Date: October 29, 2004 to October 31, 2004
URL: http://faculty.centenarycollege.edu/writing/conference2 ....
Description:

The National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing promotes the teaching of writing through collaborative learning. Peer tutors and NCPTW professionals help students to become self-sufficient writers. NCPTW professionals are leaders in collaborative approaches, respond to the challenges of creating and operating writing centers, develop innovative peer tutoring programs and promote the work of their peer tutors. The conference is being held from October 29 through October 31, 2004.

Conference Theme

“Writing and Beyond” means to break out of the restrictions of common tutoring practices, settings, and pedagogies. Besides writing, some tutors may have specialties that include English as a Second Language, Learning Disabilities, literacy, numeracy, and technology, among others. What specialties should writing tutors become familiar with and what successes have tutors found when they expanded their training?

“Writing and Beyond” also refers to the location where tutors work. At colleges and universities, tutors may be placed outside the traditional center and tutor online, in classrooms, and at satellite locations. Writing Centers are also expanding into high schools, middle schools, and the surrounding communities. What locations and responsibilities should writing centers take on? Is it practical and advantageous to move out of the classical tutoring setting?

Finally, “Writing and Beyond” considers the pedagogy Writing Center Directors use to prepare tutors. Traditionally, Centers have used methods such as the inverted pyramid to lend structure to a session. Is this the best and only way to approach a session? What traditional training practices work best and what innovative practices should be adopted to meet the needs of our students?

Call for Proposals

This conference provides an opportunity for tutors and directors to discuss what they are doing as traditional writing tutors and what new ventures their center is attempting. Tutors and directors are encouraged to do a traditional conference paper or an imaginative presentation about what they see as the future of the Writing Center. These presentations could include debates, dramas, re-enactments, video presentations, discussions, digital stories, and other forms of expression. 

Anyone wishing to present at the 2004 Conference must submit a proposal to be reviewed. Proposals may be in reflection of our conference theme, Writing and Beyond, or on other pertinent topics. It should consist of a 50 word abstract and a 200 word proposal. For more information, please see our online or hard-copy forms. The extended deadline for proposal applications is May 14, 2004. We hope to hear from you!

Registration

To attend the NCPTW Conference of 2004, please pre-register by September 13, 2004. After that date, there will be a late fee of $30. Refunds will be given until October 1, 2004, after which, refund requests will not be processed. Your pre-registration may be sent to us by mail or fax. On-site registration may be available but is not guaranteed.

Event Highlights

Eight Concurrent Sessions
Keynote and Endnote address
Reception Luncheons
Awards Presentation
Dinner and a Play
Trip to New York City

 


Writing and Beyond: The 21st Annual National Conference on Peer Tutoring and Writing

Location: Hackettstown, New Jersey
Date: October 29, 2004 to October 31, 2004
URL: http://faculty.centenarycollege.edu/writing/index.html.
Contact: see website
Description:


T
he National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing promotes the teaching of writing through collaborative learning. Peer tutors and NCPTW professionals help students to become self-sufficient writers. NCPTW professionals are leaders in collaborative approaches, respond to the challenges of creating and operating writing centers, develop innovative peer tutoring programs and promote the work of their peer tutors.

Conference Theme

“Writing and Beyond”

“Writing and Beyond” means to break out of the restrictions of common tutoring practices, settings, and pedagogies. Besides writing, some tutors may have specialties that include English as a Second Language, Learning Disabilities, literacy, numeracy, and technology, among others. What specialties should writing tutors become familiar with and what successes have tutors found when they expanded their training?

“Writing and Beyond” also refers to the location where tutors work. At colleges and universities, tutors may be placed outside the traditional center and tutor online, in classrooms, and at satellite locations. Writing Centers are also expanding into high schools, middle schools, and the surrounding communities. What locations and responsibilities should writing centers take on? Is it practical and advantageous to move out of the classical tutoring setting?

Finally, “Writing and Beyond” considers the pedagogy Writing Center Directors use to prepare tutors. Traditionally, Centers have used methods such as the inverted pyramid to lend structure to a session. Is this the best and only way to approach a session? What traditional training practices work best and what innovative practices should be adopted to meet the needs of our students?

This conference provides an opportunity for tutors and directors to discuss what they are doing as traditional writing tutors and what new ventures their center is attempting. Tutors and directors are encouraged to do a traditional conference paper or an imaginative presentation about what they see as the future of the Writing Center. These presentations could include debates, dramas, re-enactments, video presentations, discussions, digital stories, and other forms of expression.

“Writing and Beyond” asks us to contemplate the present state of the Writing Center and also for us to consider where we are going and what the students we serve need most.

Proposals

Anyone wishing to present at the 2004 Conference must submit a proposal to be reviewed. Proposals may be in reflection of our conference theme, Writing and Beyond, or on other pertinent topics. It should consist of a 50 word abstract and a 200 word proposal. For more information, please see our online or hard-copy forms. The online form can be accessed at http://faculty.centenarycollege.edu/writing/proposalform.html. The deadline for proposal applications is April 26, 2004. We hope to hear from you!


New Days, New Ways: What's Ahead for Writing Programs and Writing Assessment?

Location: University of Missouri-Columbia
Date: October 21, 2004 to October 22, 2004
Contact: Connie Bowman at BowmanCJ@missouri.edu
Description:
Colloquium on Writing Assessment        Mid-America Writing
A Missouri Initiative                                   Program Administrators
18th annual meeting                                     1st annual meeting

Joint Conference

New Days, New Ways: What's Ahead
for Writing Programs & Writing Assessment?
Thursday & Friday
October 21 & 22, 2004
University of Missouri-Columbia
Hosted by MU's Campus Writing Program
an across-the-curriculum teaching, learning, and writing initiative
celebrating its 20th anniversary  
Registration
The registration fee of $90 includes parking, Thursday night dinner, Thursday and Friday break refreshments, conference materials, and speakers' honoraria.  When we receive your registration, we will mail your parking permit to you.  Be sure to tell us if you want parking for one day or both.  Deadline for registration is Friday, October 15.  A limited number of on-site registrations will be accepted.  Send your check and this form to:

Ms. Connie Bowman, Administrative Assistant
Campus Writing Program, 325 GCB
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211

Name____________________________________________________________________
Home address______________________________________________________________
Phone____________________________________________________________________
Email_____________________________________________________________________
Institution_________________________________________________________________
Title (or) Position__________________________________________________________________
Parking for         
1 Thursday only         1 Friday only       1 Both days
Campus tour (2 hrs)     
1  yes                  1  no


Lodging
A block of rooms is reserved for Wednesday and Thursday nights at Stoney Creek Inn, one mile south of campus at 2601 S. Providence Road, Columbia, MO, 65203.  Phone: 573-442-6400 (or) 800-659-2220; Fax: 573-442-6414; www.stoneycreekinn.com

The University of Missouri rate is $67.00 for up to 4 persons per room.  Continental breakfast is included.  Ask for the UMC Writing Conference rate when calling to make your reservation.  You must reserve your room by Friday, October 15, to be assured of the MU $67.00 rate. 


Directions
To get to the hotel from I-70:
Exit I-70 at Providence Road, going south
Keep going south, beyond campus, beyond the football stadium
Go west (right) at the Green Meadows stoplight and make an immediate right on the Providence Road outer road
Take the outer road back north to Stoney Creek

To get to the hotel from Hwy. 63:
Whether coming from north or south, take the Stadium Blvd. exit
Go west on Stadium Blvd
Go south (left) at Providence Road
Go west (right) at the Green Meadows stoplight and make an immediate right on the Providence Road outer road
Take the outer road back north to Stoney Creek

To get to MU from I-70 or Hwy 63 and for parking information:
Please go to http://visitus.missouri.edu/parking.htm


For More Information
Contact:  MU's Campus Writing Program at 573-882-4881 or BowmanCJ@missouri.edu
 

Fifth Biennial Thomas R. Watson Conference in Rhetoric and Composition

Location: University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentuky
Date: October 7, 2004 to October 9, 2004
URL: http://www.louisville.edu/a-s/english/watson .
Contact: Beth Powell
Description: The University of Louisville announces the fifth biennial Thomas R. Watson Conference in Rhetoric and Composition. "Writing at the Center" will be held October 7-9, 2004 at the University of Louisville. Featured speakers will include Susan McLeod, Howard Tinberg, Bob Schwegler, David Russell, Art Young, Joan Mullin, Paula Gillespie, Doug Hesse, Kitty Locker, John Trimbur, and many other scholars and administrators who work in and influence writing programs. Other special features of the conference include scholarship awards and student guest speakers.

We encourage composition scholars to consider the relationships among writing programs across all education levels, as well as how literacy sponsors, students, teachers, tutors, and administrators view writing programs. We invite proposals for individual presentations or panels that consider some aspect of the conference theme. Participants might explore any number of avenues, including but not limited to:

Writing Programs

* How might we envision more cooperative relationships among writing programs?
* In what ways are literacy sponsors involved with writing programs? What are their priorities for writing programs?

Students

* How can we best promote student agency?
* How do peer tutors/students view our programs? History
* Why have we become concerned with preserving our histories?
* How do we see our history at this moment?

Send proposals to Carol Mattingly, Director, Thomas R. Watson Conference, Department of English, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40292. Proposals should be postmarked by February 15, 2004.

Please visit the conference website at http://www.louisville.edu/a-s/english/watson or call 502.852.1252 for additional information.


Legal Writing Institute Biennial Conference

Location: Seattle University School of Law
Date: July 21, 2004 to January 24, 2004
URL: http://www.lwionline.org/activities/conferences.asp.
Contact: Professor Terry Seligman at tselig@comp.uark.edu
Description:

The Legal Writing Institute will hold its 2004 Conference from Wednesday, July 21 through Saturday, July 24, 2004 at Seattle University in Seattle, Washington. The theme of this eleventh biennial conference is Horizons.

During this Conference, we will reflect on the challenges the legal writing community has met and embrace the challenges that lie ahead. The conference program will allow us to mentor new teachers, share ideas, examine our scholarship, and envision ways to expand our horizons to blaze new trails.


WPA 2004: Re-envisioning Writing Program Administration: Roles, Knowledge, and Authority

Location: Newark, DE
Date: July 15, 2004 to July 18, 2004
URL: http://www2.chass.ncsu.edu/cwsp/mainprop.html.
Contact: Chris Anson at chris_anson@ncsu.edu
Description: WPA 2004 takes us to Newark, Delaware, home of the University of Delaware, the state’s flagship institution. Your hosts are UD’s Writing Center, Writing Program, English Department, and College of Arts and Sciences, as well as the member schools of WPA ‘s largest local affiliate, Philadelphia Writing Program Administrators. The main conference and assessment institute will be held at Clayton Hall, a recently renovated state-of-the-art facility on the main UD campus in Newark, and the summer workshop will be held at the Virden Center on UD’s marine studies campus in Lewes, one of Delaware’s scenic beach towns. Conference organizers are holding costs down by providing nearly all meals, including breakfasts and lunches, in the conference fee, and by making housing available in apartment-style residence halls for about $25 a night (though some may opt for the new on-campus Marriott Hotel or one of several other local hotels). Newark is easily accessible by car (Interstate 95), train (Amtrak), or airplane (Philadelphia International, 45 minutes away, or Baltimore/Washington International, 75 minutes away), which can make travel economical.

Newark is a charming college town with a lively main street offering coffee shops and pubs, burger and pizza restaurants, natural food and fine dining, and even an award-winning microbrewery. For attendees who want to combine the conference with an east coast vacation, Newark is in "the corridor" between Washington and New York, close to big city attractions, the historic sights of the Brandywine Valley, the natural beauty of the Chesapeake Bay, or fun in the sun on miles of pristine state park beaches. The conference itself will offer its own fun as well, with jazz at the Thursday evening reception by one of our own adjunct instructors (you’ll want her CD!), Friday cocktails with the Composition Blues Band before a night on the town, and dancing after the Saturday night banquet to the oldies band the Juveniles. In addition to the usual conference theme (see below), the local hosts are planning a kind of "site theme" centered on the idea of a "healthy conference." They've chosen menus that are a bit lighter in fat and calories than the food we usually eat at conferences, and they are making arrangements for use of a small on-campus gym and for optional jogs, bike rides, yoga, and pilates.

As always, the conference will bring together leaders of writing programs, WAC and WID programs, and writing centers; composition teachers; students of composition; publishers; and others from many institutions for the purpose of scholarly and social exchange. Two full days of concurrent sessions, roundtables, SIGS, and 2 1/2-hour workshops will complement plenary sessions and keynote addresses by leading members of the field. The week-long summer workshop, which will take place from July 11-15, will be led by Kathleen Blake Yancey and Bud Weiser. Susanamarie Harrington, Marlene Minor, and Dan Royer will lead the third WPA Assessment Institute on July 15, to be followed that evening by the opening session of the conference and keynote address.

This year’s theme is about change. Institutions of higher education have been characterized as slow to change, holding fast to tradition and passing down firmly held values and well established methods of governance. For those who joined faculties ten, twenty, or thirty years ago, the more things changed on our campuses, the more they seemed to stay the same. As new ideas have come and gone, the systemic core of our institutions, like an old boiler that generates the heat of our enterprise, has silently done its work, rarely entering the daily thoughts of those it serves.

But changes are taking place now on so many fronts, and so rapidly, that few people involved in higher education can go about their business and not be directly affected by the consequences of these changes. Consider a few:

  • Major policy shifts on a national level are changing the nature of the educational experience for students who will soon enter college.
  • For many campuses, budget reductions--a consequence of economic recession and the reallocation of federal and state funding--have been felt even at the core of basic education, disrupting and fracturing the delivery of instruction and services. With predictions that these cuts are only symptomatic of broader changes in the funding of higher education, many institutions are rethinking–some quite proactively–the economic systems in which they operate.
  • In this context, alternative delivery systems afforded by new technologies are changing the nature of teaching and learning through distance education options, computerized classrooms, and telecommuting. Simultaneously, concerns about the depersonalizing of the learning experience have led to new experiments that link small learning communities to mass education, delivered in online presentations.
  • Efforts to curb the exploitation of part-time and non-tenure-track faculty have been mixed, especially in a climate of economic uncertainty; but this tension has pushed some institutions toward alternative models, such as the redistribution of basic instruction in areas like composition to faculty in various disciplines.
  • The mobility of writing programs continues–with new independence for some, and new mergings or alliances for others. Oral communication and visual and technological literacies are increasingly considered for integration into existing composition curricula.

Given the pace and nature of these changes and potential changes, it is essential for those of us who teach in or help administer writing programs to think proactively and creatively, imagining new possibilities that solve some of the problems now confronting us, and advocating our ideas in ways that lead change rather than reacting to (or against) it.

Precipitated by a number of recent national and campus-specific events relating to these changes, this year’s conference theme focuses on the possibilities of re-envisioning the administration of writing programs at all types of institutions: large research universities both public and private, small liberal arts colleges, two-year and community colleges, and others. Papers, panels, roundtables, posters, and workshops are especially encouraged that take up questions about the role of those working in writing programs or coordinating writing curricula and ancillary programs, the knowledge they need (or don’t need) to do so effectively, and the nature of their authority as leaders in contexts defined by multiple forms of leadership and multiple leaders.

  • Who should direct or coordinate writing programs? What should be their status in the institution? What roles should they play in the institution and in the program? Who should teach composition, and what should be the role of the WPA in overseeing or organizing them, preparing them, or working with them on curriculum and instruction?
  • What knowledge should WPAs have in order to administer successful programs? Should WPAs be experts in composition studies, with documented credentials in the field? As programs are shifted from their traditional location in English departments, should faculty and administrators in other fields be enlisted to help in the coordination of such programs? Within programs, what knowledge or expertise should teachers have in order to teach writing? As institutions decentralize composition, creating campus-wide writing programs that place the responsibility for advanced literacy on the shoulders of teachers in a wide variety of fields, what is lost or gained as a result of moving writing instruction out of its disciplinary base?
  • Recent events have shown that higher administrators do not always look upon WPAs as a source of counsel as they make major administrative decisions about the location, nature, and goals of a writing curriculum. What degree of authority should WPAs have in running their programs? Are WPAs managers? coordinators? trainers? visionaries? How can WPAs work productively to assert disciplinary and administrative authority, or develop relationships that safeguard against the denial of their expertise and the silencing of their voices?

As always, these questions–and the overarching theme that generated them–are merely suggestions for providing a sense of cohesion in the program. Proposals on many other topics-- research studies, curricular innovations, and other issues of concern or interest to WPAs (including those who work in WAC and WID programs, writing centers, technical or professional writing programs, and graduate programs)–are encouraged. The usual WPA emphasis on interactive, participant-centered sessions, with opportunities for hands-on work and discussion, will apply. We invite proposals in a range of formats, including standard papers, entire panels, double-session workshops, and roundtables. This year, we are also introducing a poster session. Considered in all respects the equivalent of a panel presentation (and described as such), poster sessions are especially well suited to descriptions of programs, courses, projects, and innovations. Further details about the nature of the poster session is available at the proposal link below.

The conference will open Thursday, July 15, in the late afternoon with a plenary address and a reception, and will close Sunday morning. Registration costs, in the range of $190, will include breakfasts, receptions, breaks, and a banquet.

 

Submission Information

To propose a paper, panel, roundtable, poster session, or workshop, please visit the following Web site and submit your proposal electronically: http://www2.chass.ncsu.edu/cwsp/mainprop.html. All proposals received by March 15, 2004, will receive highest priority, and invitations based on those proposals will be issued by the end of March or early April. You will receive an automated email response indicating that your proposal has been successfully transmitted.

For inquiries and questions, please contact Chris M. Anson, President and 2004 WPA Program Chair at::

chris_anson@ncsu.edu

919-513-4080

919-515-6071 (fax)


Council of Writing Program Administrators 2004 Summer Conference

Location: University of Delaware
Date: July 11, 2004 to July 18, 2004
URL: http://www.english.udel.edu/wpa2004/.
Contact: Chris M. Anson at Chris_Anson@ncsu.edu
Description: The annual conference, held in mid-summer and hosted in rotation by the home institutions of members, is actually three separate activities:
  • a small, intensive, four-day workshop (attendance about 25) for newer WPAs

  • a one-day institute (attendance about 25) on assessment of writing and writing programs

  • a three-day conference (attendance about 200) with concurrent sessions, plenary speakers, and time to network on issues of writing program administration


The Twentieth Computers and Writing Conference: Writing in Globalization: Currents, Waves, Tides

Location: Honolulu, Hawai'i
Date: June 10, 2004 to June 13, 2004
URL: http://www.hawaii.edu/cw2004/.
Contact: Judi Kirkpatrick at cw2004@hawaii.edu
Description:

The Twentieth Computers and Writing Conference will meet in Honolulu, Hawai'i from Thursday, June 10 to Sunday, June 13, 2004, hosted by the Department of Language Arts at University of Hawai'i Kapi'olani Community College and the Department of English at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa.

The conference theme, Writing in Globalization: Currents, Waves, Tides, points to the immense but sometimes unrecognized impact of globalization on the cultural, social, linguistic, and institutional contexts in which we work. Many people in the computers and writing community are incorporating perspectives on globalization into our research and teaching, trying to understand how global systems intersect with our local engagements with information technology, writing instruction, rhetoric, literary studies, distance learning initiatives, and our personal writing practices.

Call for Proposals

Submission deadline: Wednesday, October 15, 2003 via the electronic submission form on the conference web site <http://www.hawaii.edu/cw2004/>. Email address: cw2004@hawaii.edu

We invite proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, and poster presentations. See the conference web site for details on formats. Presentation topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Local Knowledges, Global Systems
  • Distance Learning in the Global Marketplace
  • Computers, Writing, and the Future of Work
  • Languages, Technologies, and Bodies
  • Teaching Writing and Literature in Postcolonial/Neocolonial/Imperial Contexts
  • English and Other Languages
  • Alternative Rhetorics in Emerging Networks
  • Diversifying Hypertext/Multimedia Theory and Practice
  • Writing and Visual/Spatial Design
  • Activist Writing in the Classroom and the World
  • Computers and Writing Across Disciplines
  • Computers and Writing Across Levels of Education
  • Assessment in Computers and Writing
  • Community Action and Community Computing
  • Professional Issues in Computers and Writing

All proposals must be received by Wednesday, October 15, 2003. Submissions will be accepted beginning September 8, 2003, and must be sent through the conference web site at <http://www.hawaii.edu/cw2004>. Program participants will be selected through an anonymous peer review process.

Discussion List

The local organizers will host a discussion list to keep prospective attendees up to date on conference developments. Go to <http://www.hawaii.edu/cw2004/discussion.html> for details on how to subscribe.

Conference Program

The conference will include panels, poster sessions, roundtable discussions, and town hall meetings. As in the past, the conference will partner with the Graduate Research Network, the mentoring program, and the Computers and Writing 2004 Online Conference. Attendees will also have the opportunity to visit Hawai'i-based projects and schools that are integrating writing, computing, and community service in innovative ways.

Keynote Speakers

  • Nancy Kaplan, Director of the School of Information Arts and Technologies and Professor in the School of Communications Design, University of Baltimore
  • Douglas Kellner, George F. Kneller Philosophy of Education Chair, Social Sciences and Comparative Education, UCLA
  • Stuart Moulthrop, Professor in the School of Information Arts and Technologies and the School of Communications Design, University of Baltimore

Seventh National WAC Conference: WAC From an International Perspective

Location: St. Louis, MO
Date: May 20, 2004 to May 22, 2004
URL: http://muconf.missouri.edu/WAC2004 .
Contact: Marty Townsend at TownsendM@missouri.edu
Description: This biennial event is the largest U.S. conference dedicated to writing across the curriculum (WAC) and writing in the disciplines (WID). It is typically of interest to people using writing to improve teaching and learning—faculty, administrators, and students from post-secondary institutions, as well as faculty and administrators from secondary schools.

This year's theme, "WAC From an International Perspective," is intended to draw attention to the myriad ways that WAC and WID are conceptualized, understood, and used both within and beyond the U.S. Over the last thirty years in the U.S., the WAC educational movement has grown steadily, primarily in higher education and, to a lesser extent, at the secondary level. Over the same period, the LAC (language across the curriculum) movement in the U.K. has also grown, primarily at the secondary level; more recently, LAC has begun to appear at the post-secondary level. More notable, though, is an increased interest in diverse countries around the globe in higher education's use of writing as a tool for teaching and learning.

Electronic proposals are due Friday, October 31, 2003, via the conference website
. Propose an individual presentation, a panel, or a pre-conference workshop. And join us on Friday night, May 21, 2004 for a "Celebration of WAC" at the famous Gateway Arch, reserved that evening exclusively for WAC conference participants.

Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States 18th Annual Conference. Transfronterismo: Crossing Ethnic Borders in U.S. Literatures

Location: San Antonio, Texas
Date: March 10, 2004 to March 14, 2004
URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/conferences/melus/.
Contact: Bill Mullen at bmullen@utsa.edu
Description: We invite paper abstracts and complete panel, workshop, and roundtable proposals on all aspects of multiethnic literatures of the United States. We especially encourage those that engage in the conference theme. Transfronterismo highlights the theoretical, ideological, pragmatic practices and possibilities of hybridity, mestizaje, and diaspora in the formation of subjectivities, geopolitical coalitions, and literary cartographies.

Transfronterismo serves as an alternative space that gives birth to distinct imaginaries, one with alternative mappings for the local, the global, and their shared/overlapping boundaries. What is it that we do when we affirm, deny, or transgress the border? We offer the following list as suggestions:
  • internal diasporas and subject positions
  • transnational and comparative approaches
  • borders of genre and frontiers of lived experience
  • reverse migration and cross cultural transnationalism
  • class boundaries and capitalist borders
  • patriotism and post-nationalist politics
  • interstices and aporias of ethnic identity
  • inter-racial and inter-ethnic encounters
  • hegemonic and geopolitics negotiations
  • gender and sexual crossings
  • literacy education and pedagogy
All proposal abstracts (250 words maximum) should be submitted in triplicate. We strongly encourage proposals of complete panels, roundtables, and workshops that should include a brief description and abstracts for individual speakers. Abstracts should be postmarked 1 December 2003, addressed to Professor Bill Mullen, Department of English, Classics, and Philosophy, The University of Texas at San Antonio, 6900 North Loop 1604 West, San Antonio, TX 78249-0643. Email inquiries Bill Mullen, bmullen@utsa.edu. [Fax and email for international submissions only: (210) 458 5366]

All presenters must be members of MELUS. For information about membership and renewal visit the MELUS website at http://www.marshall.edu/melus/.

Radisson Hotel, 502 W Durango Blvd, San Antonio, TX (phone 210-224-7155)
Rooms: $95 + 16.75% tax, up to 4 persons per room. Suites: $150 to $200 + 16.75% tax (please inquire with the hotel). [Note: You must mention the MELUS conference when making reservations.]

"Acts of Writing: Performance in the Writing Center." 2004 Northern California Writing Association Conference

Location: Stanford University
Date: March 6, 2004 to March 6, 2004
URL: http://ncwca.stanford.edu.
Contact: John Tinker at jtinker@stanford.edu
Description:
In a remarkably short period of time, little more than a decade, electronic
communication has changed our understanding of writing. Instant messaging
has generated diction, grammar, and a visual language unto itself. The most
basic word-processing programs include tools for combining visual texts
with verbal information. PowerPoint has brought images into oral
presentations. And hyperlinks on the internet have changed our ideas about
organization and about the relationship between writer and reader. Writing
in this digital culture requires verbal facility, but it requires facility
with oral and visual representations as well. This growing respect for
multiple literacies has encouraged us to think about the expanding context
in which writing takes place, about orality, and about writing as public
performance. What opportunities and challenges do multimedia literacy and
the conceptualization of writing as multimedia performance present to
writing centers? How has computer-mediated writing changed the relationship
between the writing center and other academic programs? How has it changed
the act of writing?

We invite all members of your writing center staff--including students--to
propose a presentation for the Northern California Writing Center
Association's 12th annual meeting, March 6, 2004, at Stanford University.
The conference theme is "Acts of Writing," and we encourage you to
interpret this theme in whatever way speaks most meaningfully to your
thoughts and experiences regarding your writing center or writing centers
in general. The following topics and questions suggest how we are thinking
about the conference theme, but these are only suggestions. We hope you
will present at the conference whatever is most important and interesting
to you and your writing center.

Deadline for Proposals: Please complete the NCWCA on-line form for
conference proposals and send a description of your presentation (150-word
maximum for individual presentations; 250-word maximum for panels,
roundtables, and other group proposals) by December 15, 2003. If you prefer
to send your proposal by surface mail, please print out the proposal form
or request a form by mail, and send two copies of the proposal form and 8
copies of your proposal to Stanford Writing Center, Margaret Jacks Hall,
450 Serra Mall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305.

2004 Southeastern Writing Centers Association Conference: "Getting Back to Writing."

Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Date: February 19, 2004 to February 21, 2004
URL: http://www.kennesaw.edu/english/swca/.
Contact: Marcy Trianosky, Proposal Committee Chair at mtrianosky@hollins.edu.
Description:

The Southeastern Writing Center Association will hold its annual conference February 19-21, 2004. The conference will be sponsored by The Writing Center at Kennesaw State University, located in the northern suburbs of Atlanta. Peter Elbow, Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, will be the keynote speaker.

This year’s conference theme, “Getting Back to Writing,” puts the emphasis on the writing that our students bring to the tutorial and the interaction between the tutor and tutee as they respond to that writing. These activities are at the heart of the work we do in our writing centers. The year 2004 marks the 20th anniversary of Stephen North’s article, “The Idea of a Writing Center,” whose challenging ideas about the writing center tutorial were further complicated by North 10 years later in his article, “Revisiting ‘The Idea of a Writing Center.’” The conference theme and North’s thought-provoking reflections challenge us to look closely at the complex collaborative activity of the tutorial and its implications for our writing centers. Proposals are invited that examine the intersection of the tutorial with tutor training, writing center administration, faculty expectations, institutional missions, and administrative pressures. Some questions to consider are:

  • How do we assess the activity of the tutorial effectively? How do we know when our writing centers are really working?

  • How do the relationships between tutors, writers, directors, faculty and institutions affect the tutorial interaction?

  • How can tutor training address the multiple roles that tutors play in the highly contextualized environment of an institution’s writing center?

  • How do writing centers respond to administrative and institutional pressures while maintaining an emphasis on writing improvement through tutoring?

We welcome proposals that address these and related themes. We encourage submissions from staff, administrators, and faculty affiliated with writing centers at all education levels. We particularly want to encourage proposals from peer tutors, since their work is crucial to the success of many writing centers. We encourage you to consider ways in which your proposal will actively engage your audience.

Proposals are invited for poster sessions, 20-minute individual presentations, 3-5 person panels, and 90-minute workshops on topics related to the conference theme. A new award will be presented this year for the best poster session. Posters will be evaluated on the originality, content, and presentation. All posters accepted for the conference will be automatically entered into the competition. A subcommittee of the SWCA Awards Committee will review all submissions and select the recipient(s).

For detailed submission guidelines, please go to the Southeastern Writing Center Association web site and go to the link for the 2004 conference.


South Central Writing Centers 2004 Conference: "Putting Research at the Center"

Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
Date: February 19, 2004 to February 21, 2004
Contact: Melissa Ianetta at ianetta@okstate.edu
Description: In a very real sense, a writing center is the result of someone's research – it is the publication of the writing center director who sets it in motion, and it is revised or updated regularly by that person and by every new director who takes it over later.
                        Muriel Harris, "Presenting Writing Center Scholarship:
                        Issues for Faculty and Personnel Committees" (1997)


        As Harris describes, in many ways a writing center is research incarnate; it embodies the director's research into the best practices of the writing center as well as representing tutors' theories of effective one-to-one writing instruction.  This year's conference focuses on the reciprocal relationship of writing centers and research.  How does the writing center itself challenge our definitions of research? How does research influence the ways in which we conduct tutorials or administer the writing center?    We invite sessions on any topics relevant to writing center studies, but are particularly interested in sessions that engage this issue.  Possible topics include:

·        Theorizing the writing center
·        Writing centers and undergraduate research programs
·        Uses of qualitative and quantitative research
·        Definitions of "research" and the writing center
·        Writing centers as a site of interdisciplinary research
·        Historical research: the relationship of the center's past to its present  

Keynote speaker will be Dr. Carol Mattingly, Director of the Writing Centers Research Project. Dr. Mattingly is Professor of English and Director of the University Writing Center at the University of Louisville.  She also serves as the Director of the Writing Center Research Project.    

Please submit one-page proposals for twenty minute papers or for ninety-minute panel presentations, roundtable discussions or workshops with your name, address, affiliation and email address.  In your proposal, please indicate the format of your presentation (individual paper, panel, roundtable discussion, workshop). Send to:

Melissa Ianetta / Kala Blankenship, SCWCA Conference Co-Chairs
English Department
205 Morrill Hall
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater OK, 74078
 405-744-9365
email: ianetta@okstate.edu

Proposals must be emailed or postmarked by November 1, 2003.

45th Annual Midwest Modern Language Association Convention: "The University"

Location: Hilton Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Date: November 7, 2003 to November 9, 2003
URL: http://www.uiowa.edu/~mmla/.

The Spilman Symposium on Issues in Teaching Writing Celebrates Its 10th Anniversary: Re-Defining English 101: Ten Years Later

Location: Virginia Military Institute
Date: October 25, 2003 to October 25, 2003
Contact: Christina R. McDonald at mcdonaldcr@vmi.edu
Description:

The Spilman Symposium on Issues in Teaching Writing is a one-day, annual event created to bring teachers of writing together for conversations with some of the major scholars in rhetoric and composition studies.  Providing a forum for active engagement of timely issues, the symposium is designed as a think-tank for all faculty who are interested in the teaching of writing, including those involved with writing across the curriculum.

To commemorate the 10th anniversary of the symposium, speakers and participants will revisit the topic with which the Spilman began ten years ago:  Defining English 101: The Goals of Freshman Composition.  This year participants will explore the trends-the questions, challenges, or debates-that have characterized the discipline's view of first-year composition during the last decade, paying special attention to the influence this evolution has had on the day-to-day work of teachers of writing.

Two of the featured speakers from the inaugural program, Erika Lindemann (UNC-Chapel Hill) and Gary Tate (TCU), will return to VMI to participate in the day's events.  Anne Ruggles Gere (U of Michigan-Ann Arbor) will deliver the keynote address.

In the spirit of continuing the symposium's commitment to involvement, for the first time this year the program will include a panel of presentations selected from submissions by symposium participants.

Registration:    Early registration is strongly encouraged.  Participation in limited to the first 80 paid registrants. The conference registration is $40.00 and includes lunch, morning and afternoon refreshments, as well as conference materials.  Registration must be postmarked by October 16, 2003 and cannot be accepted by phone, e-mail, or fax.  A printable registration form is available electronically at: http://www.vmi.edu/show.asp?durki=1947.

For additional information, please contact: Christina R. McDonald, Institute Director of Writing, Department of English and Fine Arts, Virginia Military Institute (540-464-7240) or mcdonaldcr@vmi.edu


IWCA-NCPTW Joint Conference

Location: Hershey, Pennsylvania
Date: October 23, 2003 to October 25, 2003
URL: http://www.wc.iup.edu/2003conference/index.htm.
Contact: Ben Rafoth (Conference Chair) at brafoth@iup.edu
Description:

Who is the conference for?

  • Writing tutors (undergrad, grad, and secondary school)

  • Writing teachers  

  • Writing center directors 

What events will take place at the conference?

  • Many presentations and interactive sessions

  • Keynote address

  • Endnote featured presentation

  • Evening reception, luncheon, 2 breakfasts

  • Tour of Chocolate World

  • Trip to Hershey Theme Park

  • Book and vendor displays

  • Trail walk or hike

What is the IWCA-NCPTW?

The International Writing Centers Association, an NCTE Assembly, was founded in 1983 to foster communication among writing centers and to provide a forum for concerns. Comprising directors and staffs of writing centers at universities, two-year colleges, and public schools, the IWCA is governed by an Executive Board that includes representatives from the regional writing center organizations.

The National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing promotes the teaching of writing through collaborative learning. Peer tutors and NCPTW professionals help students to become self-sufficient writers.  Since the first annual conference at Brown University in 1984,  NCPTW professionals have been leaders in collaborative approaches, responding to the challenges of creating and operating writing centers, developing innovative peer tutoring programs, and promoting the work of peer tutors.


Western States Rhetoric and Literacy Conference: Rhetorics and Literacies: Past, Present, Future

Location: University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
Date: October 23, 2003 to October 25, 2003
URL: http://www.public.asu.edu/~petergo/wsrl/wsrl.html.
Contact: Maureen Mathison at Maureen.mathison@m.cc.utah.edu
Description: The Western States Rhetoric and Literacy Conference was initiated to allow scholars in the Western region to come together and exchange current research in rhetoric and literacy studies. In keeping with the spirit of a small gathering, the conference will be held in a professional but relaxed atmosphere.

Its goal is to address theoretical and pedagogical issues through a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives. Each year, the conference will focus on a particular theme. While we especially welcome proposals that address the theme for each particular year, we may also consider proposals that deal with other relevant topics and issues for our field.

The Fourth Biennial Feminism(s) & Rhetoric(s) Conference: Intersections: Critical Locations of Feminist Rhetorical Practice

Location: Columbus campus of The Ohio State University
Date: October 23, 2003 to October 25, 2003
URL: http://english.ohio-state.edu/femrhet.
Contact: Nan Johnson at johnson.112@osu.edu
Description: Recognizing the cross-disciplinarity and multivocality of feminisms and rhetorics, this conference invites the participation of scholars, activists, and artists in feminist theory, literacy theory, rhetorical theory, speech communication, art and art theory, creative writing, literary theory, women's studies, education, comparative studies, composition, linguistics, history, postcolonial theory, and other fields.

Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication 2003 "Reaching Out: Incorporating the Borders that Inscribe Us"

Location: Potsdam, NY
Date: October 2, 2003 to October 4, 2003
URL: http://www.cptsc.org/conferences.html.
Contact: Jim Dubinsky and Karla Kitalong at kitalong@mail.ucf.edu
Description: The Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC) announces its 30th annual meeting October 2-4, 2003, in Potsdam, NY, which will be hosted by the Department of Technical Communications at Clarkson University. We invite you to submit position papers on the conference theme: "Reaching Out: Incorporating the Borders that Inscribe Us." In addition, for the first time, this year's conference will include poster presentations, which we'll display in a prominent venue to encourage discussion and feedback.

The CPTSC conference emphasizes discussion rather than presentation. Participants present five-minute papers in order to generate discussion. The audience includes people from new, as well as established, programs and anyone with programmatic interests in technical and scientific communication. We welcome participants from secondary, community college, or university levels, as well as representatives of industry.

Multiliteracies: The Contact Zone: 2003 International AILA Conference on Literacy

Location: Ghent, Belgium
Date: September 22, 2003 to September 27, 2003
URL: http://memling.rug.ac.be/aila.
Contact: Ronald Soetaert and Bart Bonamie at literacy@memling.rug.ac.be
Description: This conference is organized under the umbrella of the AILA Scientific Commission on Literacy. The conference will aim to bring together a group of established and emerging scholars from around the world, focus on the changing literacy practices of contemporary times, have an interdisciplinary focus, and focus on cutting-edge work in the distinct and emerging fields of language and literacy research that make up literacy studies, as well as numeracy studies.

Themes on this conference will include, but not be limited to: Literacies and Development (Globalisation, social development, third world development etc); Literacies and Languages (Reading, Writing, Minority Languages, etc); Literacies and Identity; Literacies and Education (Special needs, …); Specific Literacies (Digital, Media, Environmental, Youth, Family, Gender, Scientific, Numeracy, Emergent, etc); Institutional Literacies (Academia, Schools, Museum...); Cultural Literacies (Literacies & Cultural Studies); Literacies & Research Issues; and Literacies and Education (Academic, Special needs, etc).

The Alliance of Rhetoric Societies (ARS) Conference on the Status and Future of Rhetorical Studies

Location: Northwestern University
Date: September 11, 2003 to September 14, 2003
Description: ARS will be publicly launched next September at a conference that highlights four major issues: (1) How ought we to understand the concept of rhetorical agency? (2) Do we have a “rhetorical tradition”? Are we better advised to think of traditions rather than a single tradition? If we do recognize a tradition or several traditions, how do we identify and characterize it (or them)? (3) What should be the institutional and social goals for academic rhetoric in the twenty-first century? How can rhetoric best contribute to the social, political, and cultural environment that extends beyond the University? (4) What does it mean to teach rhetoric? What does it mean to teach composition and performance seriously? What is the relationship between rhetoric and composition? Should they be distinguished?

A plenary speaker will address each of these issues, and another speaker will offer a formal response. The plenary speakers are: Karlyn Campbell, University of Minnesota; Jerzy Axer, University of Warsaw; Steve Mailloux, University of California-Irvine, and Jacqueline Jones Royster, Ohio State University. The respondents are: Sharon Crowley, Arizona State University, Jeffrey Walker, Emory University, James Aune, Texas A&M University, and Wayne Booth, University of Chicago.

Much of the conference will be devoted to sessions involving small working groups. Each group will focus on one of the four issues and will consider substantive ideas, common agendas for scholarship, and plans for future action. Consistent with the objectives of the association, the conference is designed to promote conversation across disciplinary lines and to encourage coordinate effort in rhetorical scholarship.

Participation in the conference is open to all interested parties and requires only submission of a brief position statement (no more than two pages) concerning one of the four issues. Copies of the statement must be sent to both of the conference co-directors:

Andrea Lunsford
Department of English
450 Serra Mall
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 93405-2087
lunsford@stanford.edu

Michael Leff
Department of Communication Studies
1815 Chicago Ave.
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60208-1340
m-leff@northwestern.edu

These statements must be received no later than May 1. E-mail submissions are welcome.

2003 Council of Writing Program Administrators Summer Conference: Better by Design: Building Programs, Strengthening Bridges

Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Date: July 10, 2003 to July 13, 2003
URL: http://www.gvsu.edu/writing/wpa/.
Contact: Chris Anson at chris_anson@NCSU.EDU
Description: Echoing Grand Rapids’ city motto, "Better by Design," WPA 2003 will focus on what builds, sustains, and expands successful writing programs. Unlike many academic departments, which can often function as independent units, writing programs are structurally interconnected to all parts of an institution, providing foundational support for their work. Strong writing programs create strong learners, thinkers, and ommunicators, and allow other departments and programs to build on these characteristics. But for writing programs to create this foundational support, they need to be well maintained, entrepreneurial, and energetic. WPAs well know the challenges to such principles—challenges of funding and financial support, challenges of personnel, challenges of too much work with too little help. WPA 2003 will concentrate on principles of work and design, of reaching maximum potential with available materials, strengthening what we do to serve the needs of our communities while maintaining the integrity of our professional standards, pedagogical knowledge, and principles of equity. To honor Grand Rapids’ dedication to its own improvement and support of its citizens, we borrow from its history and its mission in framing questions that papers and panels might address. We invite you to propose responses to these or any other issues important to the building (or rebuilding), maintenance, and future design of writing programs in all their forms and manifestations.

2003 Council of Writing Program Administrators Summer Workshop

Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Date: July 6, 2003 to July 10, 2003
URL: http://www.gvsu.edu/writing/wpa/.
Contact: Chris Anson at chris_anson@NCSU.EDU
Description: WPA invites up to thirty new and prospective writing program administrators of all kinds—as well as those in need of renewal—to take part in an intensive workshop in writing program administration. Held on the beautiful campus of Calvin College on the southeast side of Grand Rapids, MI, the workshop will provide information, strategies, advice, encouragement, and a rich professional network. Last year’s participants represented regional and national liberal arts colleges, two-year colleges, regional and flagship state universities, and major research institutions.

Rhetoric's Road Trips: Histories and Horizons: The 18th Penn State Conference on Rhetoric and Composition

Location: Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA
Date: July 6, 2003 to July 8, 2003
URL: http://app.outreach.psu.edu/Rhetoric/.
Contact: Rosa A. Eberly at rhosa@psu.edu
Description: The proposal deadline is now March 1, 2003. It has been extended because of brochure printing and mailing woes.

The Eight Conference of the International Federation for the Teaching of English

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Date: July 5, 2003 to July 8, 2003
URL: http://www.ifte.net/2003/index.htm.
Description: The theme for this year's conference is "Transforming Literacies / Changing English / Elsewheres of Potential." Details about the conference are available on the Web.

Humanities Conference: International Conference on New Directions in The Humanities: The Next World Order

Location: University of the Aegean, Island of Rhodes, Greece,
Date: July 2, 2003 to July 5, 2003
URL: http://www.HumanitiesConference.com.
Contact: Tom Nairn at tom.nairn@humanitiesconference.com
Description: This is a conference for any person with an interest in, and concern for, the humanities. The conference will address a range of critically important themes in the various fields that make up the humanities today. Main speakers will include some of the world’s leading thinkers and in the humanities, as well as numerous paper and workshop presentations by teachers and researchers.

Second Biennial Conference of the European Association for the Teaching of Academic Writing: Tutoring and Teaching Academic Writing

Location: Budapest, Hungary
Date: June 23, 2003 to June 25, 2003
URL: http://www.ceu.hu/eataw/.
Description: Writing program administrators, writing centre staff, teachers, researchers and students interested in the teaching of academic writing are invited to participate in the second joint conference of the European Association for the Teaching of Academic Writing and the European Writing Centers Association in Budapest, June 2003.

The aims of both organizations and of the conference is to create a forum for the discussion of teaching and research on academic writing across languages, to support the development of the teaching of academic writing in Europe, and to develop a supporting network of writing centers and writing programme administrators operating within a European context.

Developing Language and Communication in Higher Education: Trends in Teaching and Research

Location: Chalmers Lindholmen University College Department of Language and Communication Goteborg, Sweden
Date: June 17, 2003 to June 18, 2003
URL: http://www.chl.chalmers.se/main/inst_fack/dlc/ .
Contact: Magnus Gustafsson at magusta@chl.chalmers.se
Description: Welcome to Goteborg for an opportunity to exchange ideas and experiences related to language and communication in higher education. We invite teachers, scholars, programme administrators, graduate students, and staff from learning centers to join us in a conversation emphasising the role of written and oral communication in the academy and the workplace. Your work may be in language, communication, linguistics, language for special purposes, second language acquisition, pedagogics, technology, or in related fields. As educators, we face new challenges preparing students for an increasingly communication-rich, multicultural, and global society. How do we design courses, programmes, and support centres to prepare students for success in the academy and workplace? How do we take advantage of multiple literacies, new technologies, learning strategies, and emerging platforms to generate and implement new models for teaching and research? Call for Abstracts (deadline February 28, 2003) We invite individuals and teams to propose workshops, roundtables, and posters on any topic related to the four conference themes. Abstracts for 5-to-10-minute presentations should be designed to stimulate discussion among participants. Each one-page abstract should provide the name, institution, postal address, and e-mail of each presenter and for teams, identify one contact person. Describe the presentation, including such information as the following: - name of the presentation - aim and purpose of the presentation - overview of context, including programmes and levels involved - description of pedagogical issues, research results, or theoretical discussions Conference themes Theme A: Literacy in the academy û industry û workplace - Technical and professional communication, language for special purposes - Transference of skills within the academy and between the academy and workplace - Programme design, development, and implementation - Collaboration with industry Theme B: Learning and language across the curriculum - Writing to learn - Writing / communication-intensive courses - Platforms and learning strategies - Teaching and learning with technology Theme C: Cross-disciplinary connections - General education core units, electives, integrated courses, linked courses - Team teaching - Interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary teaching strategies and curricular activities Theme D: Research and practice - Classroom based - Theoretical, historical, empirical - Assessment - Teacher development Materials and course development - Conference fee: SEK 1600 ($160 / Ç160) including two lunches, refreshments, poster reception, and the conference dinner - Pre-conference workshop: SEK 400 ($40 / Ç40) including workshop refreshments - 50% discount for graduate students

Computers in Writing-Intensive Classrooms

Location: Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan
Date: June 16, 2003 to June 16, 2003
URL: http://www.hu.mtu.edu/ciwic.
Contact: Cheryl E. Ball at ceball@mtu.edu
Description: Computers in Writing-Intensive Classrooms (CIWIC) offers three institutes for 2003: Approaches to Integrating Computers, Integrating New Media, and Independent Projects. See the Web site for more information.

Discovering Digital Dimensions: Computers and Writing 2003 (3-D at Purdue in 2003)

Location: Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Date: May 22, 2003 to May 25, 2003
URL: http://www.cw2003.org/.
Contact: David Blakesley at blakesle@purdue.edu
Description: As in years past, the conference will provide diverse opportunities for engagement on issues of central concern to teachers, scholars, and writers in the emergent culture of the digital age. The theme—3-D at Purdue in 2003—stresses the importance of discovery in the many dimensions of learning, teaching, and writing as digital networks proliferate and make possible new forms of expression, suggest alternative rhetorics, and invite (re)presentation of our disciplinary histories.

Wildacres Retreat

Location: Near Asheville, NC at a beautiful mountain lodge
Date: May 12, 2003 to May 16, 2003
URL: http://www.uncc.edu/writing.
Contact: Deborah S Bosley, Director at Bosley, Deborah [dsbosley@EMAIL.UNCC.EDU]
Description: This year, the keynote will be given by Chris Thaiss (George Mason University) and our workshop leaders will be Rebecca Burnett (Iowa State) and Chris Anson (NC State). The atmosphere is very informal and we usually have around 75-80 people from all over the country. This year's focus will be on Writing in the Disciplines. In addition to the workshops, we'll have faculty from across our university lead a panel discussion on writing strategies and assignments thatwork.

Southern Oregon University 13th Annual Conference on Composition and Rhetoric: Reflecting on Change: Language and Literacy in the 21st Century

Location: Ashland, OR
Date: April 26, 2003 to April 26, 2003
URL: http://www.sou.edu/orcompconf/.
Contact: Mada Morgan at morganm@sou.edu
Description: The conference will bring together educators from high schools, community colleges, and four-year public and private colleges and universities to consider a range of practical and theoretical issues related to rhetoric and composition, language and literacy. We hope to offer a conference filled with conversations between teachers of all levels. Papers, panel proposals, and roundtable proposals are invited (deadline for proposals: February 14, 2003) which address issues in the changing fields of language, literacy, composition, and rhetoric.

Great Plains Alliance For Computers & Writing Conference

Location: Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska
Date: April 25, 2003 to April 26, 2003
URL: http://www.hpcnet.org/peru/schoolartsandsciences/langua ....
Contact: Bill Clemente at bclemente@oakmail.peru.edu
Description: The Great Plains Alliance for Computers and Writing (GPACW) provides a forum for educators to exchange ideas on the theory and practice of electronic literacies. For further information on the GPACW, visit the webpage at http://www.departments.dsu.edu/gpacw.

2004 NEWCA Conference: "Facing the Center: Centering, De-Centering, and Changing the Face of the Writing Center."

Location: Merrimack College, North Andover, Massachusetts
Date: April 17, 2003 to April 17, 2003
Contact: JP Nadeau at jnadeau@bryant.edu
Description: The Steering Committee of the Northeast Writing Centers Association
(NEWCA) invites you to submit proposals for "Facing the Center:
Centering, De-Centering, and Changing the Face of the Writing Center," the 2004 NEWCA conference to be held at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts on April 17, 2004. Paul Kei Matsuda, Associate Director of Composition at UNH and co-editor of On Second Language Writing and Landmark Essays on ESL Writing, will be the keynote speaker.

We are interested in the ways that the various faces of writing centers have changed, are changing, and will change.

Since this year's theme focuses on face, we are especially interested in panels that include tutors, tutees/clients/students who use our spaces, and historically under-represented "faces" of people of color, non-native English speakers, and other individuals often marginalized in writing centers and writing center scholarship.

 

Here are some questions to consider as you reflect on the rich possibilities of “face” and its relationship to writing center practice.

 

·        Who are the faces of your writing center? How have they changed, and how are they changing? Do we wish to change them, and if so, how?  Are there “traditional” writing center faces and, if so, are they the same faces of “traditional” students?

 

·        How is the “face” of the writing center changing? What physical changes have occurred? Where is it located, geographically, politically, pedagogically within your institution and/or elsewhere?  What are the possibilities for writing center collaborations (facing one another)?  How do writing centers reach faces from departments across the curriculum?

 

·        How do you face your own work? How do you do a better job of tutoring and/or help others to do a better job?

 

·        What strategies do you use to manage face-time (publicity)? How do you construct and circulate your writing center image(s) to their fullest advantage?  Within your center, how do you manage face-time?  Consider tutors and tutees, directors and tutors, writing center staff and non-writing center administration.)

 

·        What face-offs (conflicts) do you encounter and how do you manage them? How do you train tutors to negotiate face-offs?

 

 

NEWCA welcomes proposals for presentations, workshops, and panels that explore how our histories have informed our theories and practices in regard to clientele and staff, tutoring strategies, program assessment, research, technology, and design and location.

 

We encourage submissions from professional staff, administrators, and faculty affiliated with writing centers at all educational levels. Moreover, since peer tutors constitute more than half of those who attend our conference, we encourage proposals for presentations by peer tutors.

 

Your proposed presentation, workshop, or panel should actively involve the audience. In addition to interactive panels, we invite proposals that will present original scholarship (developed for courses or for future publication) in a way that benefits authors and engages audiences.

 

Proposal Submission Guidelines

 

Include the following information in your proposal:

·        Proposer’s name, position (tutor, director, etc.), institution, address, telephone number, and e-mail address

·        Presenters’ names plus all of the above

·        Title of presentation, one-page description of presentation, and a 75-word abstract for inclusion in the conference program

·        Type of session: 1) workshop – interactive session; OR 2) panel discussion – two or more presenters giving positions on a topic and then engaging the audience in discussion

·        Specific audiovisual and technical requests.

 

To submit your proposal electronically:

·        Send it as an MS Word attachment (no other formats acceptable, sorry) or include it in the body of the email;

·        Send one complete copy to and another complete copy to mcarroll3@cox.net by December 27, 2003.

 

To submit your proposal by land mail:

·        Send it to Meg Carroll, Writing Center, Rhode Island College, Providence, RI 02908. The proposal must arrive no later than December 27, 2003.

 

If you need more information about submitting your proposal, contact Meg Carroll at (401) 456-8141 or (h) (401)884-5881.


The Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association 15th Annual Conference

Location: McDaniel College, Westminster, MD
Date: April 5, 2003 to April 5, 2003
URL: http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/mawca/.
Description: Tutors, teachers, and researchers are invited to submit proposals on any subject including: (1) the relationship of the tutor and the teacher (2) tutor training (with syllabi) (3) faculty/writing center relationships: How to handle various faculty expectations (4) balancing teaching and Writing Center work-rules, conflicts, benefits, drawbacks.

National Conference on Student Writing and Critical Thinking in Agriculture

Location: Jackson Hole, WY
Date: April 4, 2003 to April 5, 2003
URL: http://uwadmnweb.uwyo.edu/AgWrite/index.htm.
Contact: Julianne Couch, Conference Coordinator at jcouch@uwyo.edu
Description: This conference is designed to be of interest to professionals in all disciplines involved in issues of student writing and critical thinking. A one-day pre-conference series of workshops focusing on various kinds of writing is also planned for April 3. The conference will be designed to provide useful teaching techniques for developing and improving student writing and critical thinking skills, assist in the development of personalized action plans for improving courses and curricula, and stimulate dialogue about teaching and learning within and across disciplines The conference is intended to be highly interactive and will be structured to promote meaningful engagement among all participants.

Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference: Constructing Knowledge Across the Humanities

Location: University of Utah, Salt Lake City
Date: April 4, 2003 to April 5, 2003
URL: http://www.hum.utah.edu/hgc/.
Contact: Paul Ketzle at pketzle@yahoo.com
Description: The University of Utah Humanities Graduate Conference is a graduate student conference developed by graduate students for graduate students.

Northeast Writing Centers Association Conference 2003: Moving Forward and Looking Back: Writing Center Histories, Herstories, and Heresies

Location: Rivier College, Nashua, New Hampshire
Date: April 4, 2003 to April 5, 2003
URL: http://web.bryant.edu/~ace/wrtctr/NEWCA.htm.
Contact: Al DeCiccio at adeciccio@rivier.edu
Description: This conference focuses on the way that histories - personal, public, and political - describe the work of WC's and tutors and considers how those histories may influence our current philosophies and practices. The keynote speaker is Neal Lerner.

The 25th Meeting of the East Central Writing Centers Association

Location: Marietta College, Ohio
Date: March 27, 2003 to March 29, 2003
URL: http://www.marietta.edu/~mcwrite/eastcentral.html.
Contact: Tim Catalano at catalant@marietta.edu
Description: On March 27th, 28th, and 29th of 2003, the East Central Writing Centers Association will be holding its 25th annual conference at Marietta College in Marietta, Ohio. In recognition of its 25th anniversary, we invite the writing center community to compose presentations, panels, and workshop proposals that explore the history of their own writing centers, and reflect on how that history has been shaped by work in related areas such as literacy education, the social sciences, and work in composition and rhetoric. Keynote Speakers include Muriel Harris (Purdue University) and Neal Lerner (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

Association of Teachers of Technical Writing

Location: NYC Hilton, in conjunction with CCCC
Date: March 19, 2003 to March 19, 2003
URL: http://www.attw.org/default.asp.
Contact: Stephen A. Bernhardt at sab@udel.edu
Description: ATTW will meet for its 6th annual conference on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 at the New York Hilton in New York City. Please see the schedule and abstracts (available on the conference Web site at http://www.attw.org/default.asp) for details on sessions, speakers, and times.

Registration is available only at the Web site, and the deadline for registration is March 1. Registration for the conference requires ATTW membership for 2003.

Re-writing Theme for English B: Transforming Possibilities. 54th Annual Conference on College Composition and Communication

Location: New York City
Date: March 19, 2003 to March 22, 2003
URL: http://www.ncte.org/convention/cccc2003/.
Description: The national meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, an NCTE organization, will be held in New York this spring. Visit the conference Web site for information about registration, accommodations, and events.

13th Annual Teaching Academic Survival Skills Conference

Location: Palm Beach Atlantic College, West Palm Beach, Florida
Date: March 9, 2003 to March 11, 2003
URL: http://cit.necc.mass.edu/tass/.
Contact: Harry Prats at Harry.Prats@UC.edu
Description: The 14th annual Teaching Academic Survival Skills (TASS) Conference is sponsored by the University College, University of Cincinnati (UC) and Northern Essex Community College (NECC). All Conference events will be held at Palm Beach Atlantic University (PBAU). Transportation will be provided from the conference hotel to PBAU.

Over the years, the TASS conference has grown and flourished. Generally, there are 30 to 50 sessions, where presenters using a workshop approach describe methods they have used to help students succeed in reading, writing, math, English as a Second Language, computer classes, and student services. Evaluations from participants have indicated that the hands-on approach used by presenters gave them a wealth of ideas, strategies, and materials to take back to their respective institutions.

Northern California Writing Centers Association 11th Annual Conference: Cultivating the Center: Connecting Diverse Writing Communities

Location: California State University, Monterey Bay Seaside, Monterey, California
Date: March 8, 2003 to March 8, 2003
URL: http://www.asap.csumb.edu/ncwca.
Contact: Natasha Oehlman at natasha_oehlman@csumb.edu
Description: As we connect our own writing center communities for this conference, we would like to acknowledge the multiple communities we work with and how best to foster diversity in the center. We look forward to exploring some of these questions:
How do writing tutors connect with communities that are very different than their own? How is a writing center community developed? How is literacy acknowledged and fostered in the center? How is writing across the curriculum supported in the center? What types of writing strategies are used in sessions to support various needs? What techniques are used to support writers with disabilities? How is the distance learner supported in the writing center? What approaches are used to connect and collaborate with faculty? Proposals on aspects of Writing Center practice and/or theory are also encouraged.
We invite writing tutors and consultants, center directors and coordinators, and faculty to work together to cultivate the various communities that make up the center.

The 25th Meeting of the East Central Writing Centers Association

Location: Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio
Date: February 27, 2003 to March 29, 2003
URL: http://www.marietta.edu/%7Emcwrite/eastcentral.html.
Contact: Tim Catalano at Catalant@marietta.edu
Description: On March 27th, 28th, and 29th of 2003, the East Central Writing Centers Association will be holding its 25th annual conference at Marietta College in Marietta, Ohio. In recognition of its 25th anniversary, we invite the writing center community to compose presentations, panels, and workshop proposals that explore the history of their own writing centers, and reflect on how that history has been shaped by work in related areas such as literacy education, the social sciences, and work in composition and rhetoric.

Border Crossings: Interplay within English Studies

Location: Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
Date: February 21, 2003 to February 22, 2003
URL: http://english.ttu.edu/GESconference/.
Contact: Russell Willerton at russell.willerton@ttu.edu
Description: The 8th Annual Graduate English Society Conference will be held February 21-22, 2003 at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The theme of this year's conference, Border Crossings: Interplay Within English Studies, reminds us that our many fields of interest within English studies provide numerous opportunities for exploration through interplay and interactions.

The conference keynote speech will be delivered in the evening of Friday, February 21, 2003, by Dr. N. Katherine Hayles of UCLA, author of _Chaos Bound: Orderly Disorder in Contemporary Literature and Science_ and _How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature and Informatics_, as well as many articles and essays on modern literary theory and the forthcoming book _Writing Machines_. Dr. Hayles will be available to meet with students throughout the day on Saturday, February 22, 2003. See http://www.english.ucla.edu/faculty/hayles/ for more information about Dr. Hayles.

Getting Back to Writing: Southeastern Writing Center Association Conference

Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Date: February 19, 2003 to February 21, 2003
URL: http://www.kennesaw.edu/english/swca/.
Description:

The conference theme “Getting Back to Writing” concerns what writing centers focus on, how we communicate our role to others, and our purposes for existing. In discussing “getting back to writing,” we question whether our theories should be based on commonalities or differences.

Since 2004 marks the twentieth anniversary of the Stephen North’s article on the idea of a writing center, proposals might play upon the themes of collaboration and intervention implied in his essays and the various reactions over the years.

Sessions might also explore to what extent our online emphasis fits our “true” purpose; our tutoring of ESL students; structure in the disciplines; teacher-tutor concerns; and administrative issues, such as numbers vs. improvement in writing.


Introduction to Problem-Based Learning and Problem Writing

Location: Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education, University of Delaware
Date: January 13, 2003 to January 14, 2003
URL: http://www.udel.edu/inst/.
Contact: George Watson at ud-itue@udel.edu
Description: This two-day workshop will demonstrate problem-based learning (PBL) and model ways that PBL can be used effectively in all disciplines, in upper and lower division courses, and in all size classes. This session will incorporate many elements of the Introductory Track at PBL2002. An emphasis of this program will be writing effective problem-based maternials; participants will leave the session with new or revised problems for use in their couses.

International Conference on Computers in Education

Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Date: December 3, 2002 to December 6, 2002
URL: http://icce2002.massey.ac.nz.

The 19th Annual National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW) in collaboration with the 21st Annual Midwest Writing Centers Association Conference (MWCA)

Location: The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas
Date: October 25, 2002 to October 27, 2002
URL: http://www.ceu.hu/eataw/.

6th Annual Western States Composition Conference: Writing and Disciplinarity: Rhetorics, Discourses, and Literacies

Location: University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Date: October 24, 2002 to October 26, 2002
URL: http://web.bryant.edu/~ace/WrtCtr/NEWCA.htm.
Contact: Peter N. Goggin at petergo@asu.edu

International Writing Centers Association-National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing 2003 Joint Conference

Location: Hershey, Pennsylvania
Date: October 23, 2002 to October 25, 2002
URL: http://www.wc.iup.edu/2003conference.

Thomas R. Watson Conference in Rhetoric and Composition:

Location: University of Louisville
Date: October 10, 2002 to October 12, 2002
URL: http://www.louisville.edu/a-s/english/watson/.

Writing Programs Administrators Summer Workshop

Location: Park City, Utah
Date: July 11, 2002 to July 14, 2002
Contact: Kathleen Yancey at Kyancey@clemson.edu

8th International Conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction. Writing Special Interest Group

Location: Staffordshire University, Stafford, UK
Date: July 10, 2002 to July 13, 2002
URL: http://www.staffs.ac.uk/writing02%20.

International Society for the Study of Argumentation, 5th International Conference on Argumentation

Location: University of Amsterdam
Date: June 25, 2002 to June 28, 2002
URL: http://www.hum.uva.nl/issa/.

PBL2002: A Pathway to Better Learning: An International Conference on Problem-Based Learning

Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Date: June 16, 2002 to June 20, 2002
URL: http://www.udel.edu/ce/pbl2002/.
Description: An increasing number of academic institutions throughout the world have recognized that Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is an instructional method that challenges students to develop the ability to think critically, analyze problems, find and use appropriate learning resources. This conference will provide an opportunity for PBL practitioners to communicate with one another and share their ideas for organizing and managing undergraduate problem-based courses, assessing student learning, writing problems, conducting classroom research, integrating PBL with Internet resources, and a variety of related topics. At the same time, faculty who are new to PBL or who are interested in learning about problem-based instruction will have the option to participate in a series of workshops that will help prepare them to use PBL in their own courses.

Rhetoric Society of America 10th Biennial Conference: "Rhetorical Democracy: Discursive Practices of Civic Engagement"

Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Date: May 23, 2002 to May 27, 2002
URL: http://rhetoricsociety.org/.

Teaching and Learning in Virtual Spaces: Computers and Writing 2002

Location: Illinois State University, Normal, IL
Date: May 16, 2002 to May 19, 2002
URL: http://lilt.ilstu.edu/english/cw2002/.

Fourteenth Annual Conference: Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association

Location: Chesapeake College, Wye Mills, MD
Date: April 27, 2002 to January 1, 1900
Description: For information, contact Cathy Sewell, Conference Chair, at csewell@Chesapeake.edu or 410-822-5400, x 1-368

Southern California WPA and Writing Centers Association Spring Conference: The Contexts of Composition: Considering Issues, Defining Goals

Location: California State University, Northridge
Date: April 27, 2002 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.southwestern.edu/~scwca/.
Contact: Irene L. Clark at irene.clark@csun.edu

Futures of World Literatures and Literacies: The Fifth Annual International Red River Conference on World Literature and the Fifth Annual Great Plains Alliance for Computers and Writing join conference

Location: North Dakota State University, Fargo ND
Date: April 25, 2002 to April 28, 2002
URL: http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/RRCWL/cfp02.html.

Northeast Writing Centers Association Conference

Location: Bryant College, Smithfield, Rhode Island
Date: April 20, 2002 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.slcc.edu/wc/rmptc9/.
Contact: JP Nadeau at jnadeau@bryant.edu

9th Rocky Mountain Peer Tutoring Conference

Location: Salt Lake City
Date: April 19, 2002 to April 20, 2002
URL: http://www.hu.mtu.edu/cptsc/conferences/96/program.html.
Contact: Clint Gardner at Clint.Gardner@slcc.edu

International Writing Centers Association Conference: The Art of Writing Centers

Location: Savannah, Georgia
Date: April 11, 2002 to April 13, 2002
URL: http://iwca.syr.edu/conference.

Technology in the College English Classroom: Literature, Culture, Pedagogy

Location: University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina
Date: April 5, 2002 to April 7, 2002
Description: For information, contact Christian Moraru, Conference Director, at c_moraru@uncg.edu or (336) 334-3564

24th Annual East Central Writing Centers Association Conference: The Expanding Center: Big (and Little) Bangs in Writing Center Theory and Practice

Location: Kent State University-Stark Campus, Canton, Ohio
Date: April 4, 2002 to April 6, 2002
Description: For information, contact Jay Sloan at jsloan@stark.kent.edu or (330) 244-3458

Promise or Peril? Reflecting on Computer Technology: Educational, Psychological, and Ethical Implications

Location: Mount Mary College, Milwaukee
Date: March 21, 2002 to March 22, 2002
URL: http://www.mtmary.edu/symposium.htm.

Connecting the Text and the Street. Conference on College Composition and Communication 53rd Annual Convention

Location: Chicago, Illinois
Date: March 20, 2002 to March 23, 2002
URL: http://www.ncte.org/convention/cccc2002/.

Writing the Future: Leadership, Policies, and Classroom Practices. WAC 2002: The Sixth National Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

Location: Rice University, Houston
Date: March 7, 2002 to March 9, 2002
URL: http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~wac2002/.

South Central Writing Centers Association Conference: Explorations in Alter Space: Balancing the Traditional with the Transformational

Location: Houston
Date: February 22, 2002 to February 23, 2002
URL: http://www.public.asu.edu/~petergo/wscc/wscc.html .
Contact: Chloe Diepenbrock at diepenbrock@cl.uh.edu

Writing from the Center: The 18th Annual National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing

Location: Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA
Date: November 2, 2001 to November 4, 2001
URL: http://www.chss.iup.edu/wc/NCPTW/muhlenb.html.

Composition and Rhetoric: Uses of Technology in the Composition Classroom. 11th Annual Central New York Conference on Language and Literature

Location: Cortland College of the State University of New York
Date: October 28, 2001 to October 30, 2001
Description: For information, contact Mary E. Fakler at faklerm@newpaltz.edu.

Fifth Annual Western States Composition Conference: Writing: What is it? Why Study it? Why Teach it?

Location: Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
Date: October 25, 2001 to October 27, 2001
URL: http://www.public.asu.edu/~petergo/wscc/wscc01.html.

Conversations about Composition: An Annual Conference on the Teaching of Writing in Connecticut

Location: New Haven, Connecticut
Date: October 20, 2001 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.southernct.edu/~henderso/conference.htm.

Feminist Literacies: Resisting Disciplines Third Biennial International Feminism(s) and Rhetoric(s) Conference

Location: Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois
Date: October 18, 2001 to October 20, 2001
URL: http://academic.mu.edu/cwshrc/conferences.htm.

2001 Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication: "Managing Change and Growth in Technical and Scientific Communication."

Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Date: October 11, 2001 to October 13, 2001
URL: http://www.gsu.edu/~wwwcpt/.

Writing as a Human Activity: An Interdisciplinary Conference at the University of California, Santa Barbara

Date: October 5, 2001 to October 6, 2001
Description: View the Call for Proposals.

Composition Studies in the 21st Century. Rereading the Past--Rewriting the Future

Location: Council of Writing Program Administrators. Miami University, Oxford, Ohio
Date: October 5, 2001 to October 7, 2001
URL: http://www.cas.ilstu.edu/English/Hesse/wpamiami2001.htm ....

Looking Back, Leaping Forward: Writing Centers in the 21st Century. Midwest Writing Centers Association 2001 Conference

Location: University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Date: September 14, 2001 to September 15, 2001
URL: http://www.ku.edu/~mwca/.

Writing Programs Administrators Summer Workshop

Location: Arizona State University East, Tempe, Arizona
Date: July 8, 2001 to July 12, 2001

The Penn State Conference on Rhetoric and Composition: American Ethnic Rhetorics

Location: State College, Pennsylvania
Date: July 8, 2001 to July 10, 2001
URL: http://www.outreach.psu.edu/C&I/Rhet&Comp/.

What Do the Best Professors Do? Sixth Annual International Institute

Location: Searle Center for Teaching Excellence, Northwestern University, and Larisa Marshall Consortium for Excellence in Learning and Teaching. Evanston, Illinois
Date: June 27, 2001 to July 29, 2001
URL: http://president.scfte.nwu.edu/Bestteachers2001.html.

Summer Institutes on Computers in Writing-Intensive Classrooms

Location: Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan
Date: June 18, 2001 to June 29, 2001

Teaching Academic Writing across Europe. First Conference of EATAW: The European Association for the Teaching of Academic Writing

Location: Groningen, the Netherlands
Date: June 17, 2001 to June 20, 2001
URL: http://www.hum.ku.dk/formidling/eataw/.

The Fifth National Writing Across the Curriculum Conference: Writing, Teaching, and Learning in New Contexts

Location: Bloomington, Indiana
Date: May 31, 2001 to June 2, 2001
URL: http://www.indiana.edu/~wac2001/.

2001: A Cyber Odyssey. The 17th Computers and Writing Conference

Location: Ball State University, Muncie, IN
Date: May 17, 2001 to May 20, 2001
URL: http://www.bsu.edu/xtranet/cw2001/.

Electronic Communities: Experimenting, Writing and Designing. Great Plains Alliance for Computers and Writing, 4th Annual Conference

Location: Dakota State University, Madison, SD
Date: April 19, 2001 to April 22, 2001
URL: http://www.departments.dsu.edu/gpacw/.

Conspiring Together: Promoting Peer Collaboration and Connection. Northwest Regional Writing Centers Conference

Location: Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA
Date: April 7, 2001 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~writepro/Conference.htm.

Literacies, Identities, and Power. Annual Northeast Regional Writing Centers Association Conference

Location: Clark University, Worcester, MA
Date: March 31, 2001 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www2.clarku.edu/resources/writingcenter/NEWCA/.

Pacific Rim Literary Conference

Location: University of Alaska, Anchorage
Date: March 30, 2001 to March 31, 2001
URL: http://www.engl.uaa.alaska.edu/prlc.htm.

Northeast Modern Language Association

Location: Hartford, Connecticut
Date: March 30, 2001 to March 31, 2001
URL: http://www.anna-maria.edu/nemla/.

Writing Center Gumbo: The Mix of Student, Tutor, and Director Roles and Identities. South Central Writing Association 2001 Conference

Location: University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, Louisiana
Date: March 29, 2001 to March 31, 2001
Description: For questions, contact James McDonald at jcm5337@louisiana.edu or (337) 482-6907.

Inquiry and Innovation: Images of Writing Centers. 23rd Annual East Central Writing Centers Association Conference

Location: Denison University, Granville, OH
Date: March 23, 2001 to March 24, 2001
URL: http://www.denison.edu/ecwca2001.

Computers and Writing Online Conference, 2001: A Cyber Odyssey

Date: March 23, 2001 to May 31, 2001
URL: http://web.nwe.ufl.edu/cwonline2001/.

Conference on College Composition and Communication Annual Convention

Location: Adam's Mark Hotel, Denver, Colorado
Date: March 14, 2001 to March 17, 2001
URL: http://www.ncte.org/convention/cccc2001/.

Stepping Through the Looking Glass: Reflections on, Revisions of, and Premonitions about English Studies in the 21st Century. Sponsored by the Graduate English Society, Texas Tech University

Location: Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas
Date: February 23, 2001 to February 24, 2001
URL: http://english.ttu.edu/ges/conference/conf2001.

Southeastern Writing Center Association: "Collaboration at the Center"

Location: Auburn, Alabama
Date: February 16, 2001 to February 18, 2001
Description: For information, contact Isabelle Thompson at thompis@groupwise1.duc.auburn.edu or Glenda Conway at conwayg@montevallo.edu.

Collaboration at the Center: Southeastern Writing Center Association 2001 Conference

Location: Auburn, Alabama
Date: February 15, 2001 to February 17, 2001
Description: View the Call for Proposals.

Making Connections IX: Writing Across the Disciplines Conference: Creating a Community of Educators, #2

Location: Florida International University, Miami, Florida
Date: February 14, 2001 to February 17, 2001
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~wad/.
Description: Click on "WAD 2001" on the menu.

ACM 2000 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work

Location: Philadelphia
Date: December 2, 2000 to December 6, 2000
URL: http://www.acm.org/sigchi/cscw2000/.

Teaching Matters. 90th Annual Convention of the National Council of Teachers of English

Location: Milwaukee, WI
Date: November 16, 2000 to November 19, 2000
URL: http://www.ncte.org/convention/2000/index.shtml.

Community College Humanities Association 2000 Annual Meeting, Eastern Division: Mr. Chips in Cyber College: Humanities, Technology and Education

Location: Montgomery College, Doubletree Hotel, Rockville, Maryland
Date: November 9, 2000 to November 11, 2000
URL: http://www.mc.cc.md.us/Orgs/humanities/ccha/.

The 6th International Conference on Asynchronous Learning Networks: Building Sustainable Online Learning Environments

Location: University of Maryland University College in Adelphi, MD
Date: November 3, 2000 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.aln.org/alnconf2000/cfp.html.

The 42nd Annual Convention of the Midwest Modern Language Association: Crossroads 2000: Reading, Pedagogy, Academic Labor

Location: Kansas City, Missouri
Date: November 2, 2000 to November 4, 2000
URL: http://www.uiowa.edu/~mmla/.
Description: View the Call for Proposals.

The National Writing Centers Association Conference

Location: Omni Inner Harbor Hotel, Baltimore, MD
Date: November 2, 2000 to November 4, 2000
URL: http://www.english.udel.edu/wc/mawca/nwcacon.html.

10th Annual Central New York Conference on Language and Literature

Location: Cortland College of the State University of New York
Date: October 29, 2000 to October 31, 2000
URL: http://english.cortland.edu/departme.htm.

Michigan College English Conference: Literature and Literacies: Teaching English in the 21st Century

Location: Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Arcadia Commons Campus, Kalamazoo, Michigan
Date: October 20, 2000 to October 21, 2000
URL: http://puma.kvcc.edu/mcea/.

Western States Composition Conference: Writing and Diversity: Literacy, Community, and Social Connections

Location: University of Utah, Salt Lake City
Date: October 12, 2000 to October 14, 2000
URL: http://www.public.asu.edu/~petergo/wscc/wscc00.html.

Visions II: Transformations. A Regional Conference for Writing Instructors and Program Administrators

Location: Allerton Conference Center, Monticello, IL
Date: October 8, 2000 to October 9, 2000
Description: View the Call for Proposals.

Looking Ahead, Looking Back. National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing: Peer Tutoring 2000

Location: North Andover, MA
Date: October 6, 2000 to October 8, 2000

Thomas R. Watson Conference on Rhetoric and Composition: Labor, Writing Technologies, and the Shaping of Composition in the Academy

Location: University of Louisville
Date: October 5, 2000 to October 7, 2000
URL: http://www.louisville.edu/a-s/english/watson.html.

Institute for Scientific and Technical Communicators Conference 2000: Communicating by design. Professional Development for Information Designers

Location: UMIST Manchester
Date: September 29, 2000 to October 1, 2000
URL: http://www.istc.org.uk/.

The Third Biennial Communication Skills in University Education (CSUE) Conference

Location: Fremantle, Perth, Western Australia
Date: September 28, 2000 to September 29, 2000
URL: http://www.bs.ac.cowan.edu.au/csue2000/.

2000 Midwest Writing Centers Association Conference: Opening Centers to Diversity

Location: Minneapolis
Date: September 28, 2000 to September 30, 2000
Description: View the Call for Proposals.

Symposium on Second Language Writing: Context of L2 Writing

Location: West Lafayette, Indiana
Date: September 15, 2000 to September 16, 2000
URL: http://icdweb.cc.purdue.edu/~silvat/symposium/2000/.

NCTE International Conference, Utrecht 2000

Location: Utrecht, The Netherlands
Date: August 1, 2000 to August 5, 2000
URL: http://www.ncte.org/convention/global/.

2000 WPA Summer Workshop and Conference: In the Thick of Things

Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
Date: July 13, 2000 to July 16, 2000
URL: http://www.cas.ilstu.edu/english/hesse/2000annwkshp.htm.

Forum 2000: Technical Communicators Leading the Way

Location: Commonwealth Institute in London, England
Date: June 12, 2000 to June 14, 2000
URL: http://www.istc.org.uk/.

LONDON 2000: Roundtable Discussion of European and North American Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication.

Location: University of Delaware London Centre, Bloomsbury, London, England
Date: June 10, 2000 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.kuce.org/app/ncptw/.

ACM Digital Libraries 2000

Location: San Antonio, Texas
Date: June 2, 2000 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.hu.mtu.edu/cptsc/conferences/london_2000.htm.

Noise to Signal: Making Sense of WAC with Technology

Location: Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia
Date: June 2, 2000 to June 7, 2000
URL: http://www.dl00.org/.

Computers and Writing 2000

Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Date: May 25, 2000 to June 3, 2000
URL: http://www.marshall.edu/wac/wac2k/.
Description: See in particular the call for papers related to "Communicating Across the Curriculum" at http://www.eaze.net/~jfbarber/cw2k/cac-strand-cfp.html.

New Information Technologies and Liberal Education

Location: Furman University, Greenville, South Carolina
Date: May 5, 2000 to June 6, 2000
URL: http://web.nwe.ufl.edu/cw2konline.

Fifth Annual Teaching in the Community Colleges Online Conference. A Virtual Odyssey: What's Ahead for New Technologies in Learning?

Date: April 12, 2000 to May 7, 2000
URL: http://www.furman.edu/symposium/.

Conference on College Composition and Communication

Location: Minneapolis
Date: April 12, 2000 to April 14, 2000
URL: http://leahi.kcc.hawaii.edu/org/tcon2000/.

The National Council of Teachers of English 2000 Spring Conference

Location: New York
Date: March 16, 2000 to April 15, 2000
URL: http://www.ncte.org/convention/cccc2000/index.shtml.

Third International Symposium On Electronic Theses & Dissertations: Applying New Media to Scholarship

Location: University of South Florida, St. Petersburg
Date: March 16, 2000 to March 18, 2000
URL: http://www.ncte.org/convention/spring2000/index.shtml.

Computers and Writing 2000 Online

Date: March 15, 2000 to May 28, 2000
URL: http://www.eaze.net/~jfbarber/cw2k/bridge.html.

Great Plains Alliance for Computers and Writing: 3rd Annual Conference

Location: University of South Dakota, /02/ 26, 2000
Date: February 27, 2000 to March 18, 2000
URL: http://etd.eng.usf.edu/conference.

Making Connections VIII: Writing Across the Disciplines Conference: Creating a Community of Educators, #1

Location: Florida International University
Date: February 18, 2000 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.usd.edu/engl/gpacw/.
Description: Click on "Conference 2000" on the menu.

Issues in Assessing Writing: Teaching with Writing Across the University

Location: University of Missouri at Kansas City
Date: December 9, 1999 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~wad/.
Description: View the Call for Proposals.

Writing at the Interface. Online Conference

Location: Purdue University
Date: December 7, 1999 to December 10, 1999
Description: View the Call for Proposals.

National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW)

Location: Plattsburgh State University of New York
Date: November 6, 1999 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~wad/.

Sixteenth Annual National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW): Unmasking Writing: A Collaborative Process

Location: Penn State University
Date: October 29, 1999 to October 16, 1999
URL: http://www.nmsu.edu/techprof/cptsc99/cptsc99Top.html.

Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication: Science, Technology, and Communication: Program Design in the Past, Present, and Future

Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico
Date: October 14, 1999 to December 8, 1999
Description: Program and Abstract are Available at http://www.nmsu.edu/techprof/cptsc99/abstracts/abstracts.html.

The Fourth National Writing Across the Curriculum Conference: Multiple Intelligences

Location: Ithaca, New York
Date: June 3, 1999 to October 31, 1999
URL: http://www.outreach.psu.edu/C&I/PeerTutoring/.

Making Connections VII: Writing Across the Disciplines Conference: Writing and Teaching - Freedom and Authority

Location: Florida International University
Date: February 12, 1999 to June 5, 1999
URL: http://www.arts.cornell.edu/jskwp/wac99.html.
Description: Click on the Conference Listing on the menu.

The 1998 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work

Location: Seattle, Washington
Date: November 14, 1998 to November 8, 1998
URL: http://www.plattsburgh.edu/cas/Conferences/Tutor/tutor. ....

Making Connections VI: Writing Across the Disciplines Conference: Writing and Teaching - Myths and Realities

Location: Florida International University
Date: February 13, 1998 to November 18, 1998
URL: http://www.acm.org/sigchi/cscw98/.
Description: Click on the Conference Listing on the menu.

Making Connections V: Writing Across the Disciplines Conference: Writing and Teaching with Love

Location: Florida International University
Date: February 14, 1997 to February 8, 1997
URL: http://www.citadel.edu/citadel/otherserv/wctr/wac_conf. ....
Description: Click on the Conference Listing on the menu.

The Third National Writing Across the Curriculum Conference

Location: Charleston, South Carolina
Date: February 6, 1997 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~wad/.

CPTSC Annual Meeting: Reinventing Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication

Location: Oxford, Ohio
Date: September 26, 1996 to November 20, 1996
URL: http://www.acm.org/sigchi/cscw96/.
Description: Proceedings are available at http://www.hu.mtu.edu/cptsc/conferences/proceedings96/titlepage.html.

1997 National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW)

Location: University of Kentucky
Date: January 1, 1900 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~wad/.

The 1996 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work: Cooperating Communities

Location: Boston
Date: January 1, 1900 to January 1, 1900
URL: http://www.uky.edu/ArtsSciences/English/wc/NCPTW.html.