Announcements & Calls

Welcome to the WAC Clearinghouse Calls and Announcements Listings. You can view calls and announcements with upcoming and passed deadlines. If you are a member of the WAC Clearinghouse, you can recommend that calls and announcements be added to this list.

Go Hide Past Calls and Announcements   Add Add a Call or Announcement

Calls & Announcements with Passed Deadlines

Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing.

URL: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh
Deadline: June 16, 2017.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu

Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing invites submissions for Volume 5.  The deadline for this volume is 6/16/2017, but this is also an open call for subsequent volumes as well.

Double Helix publishes work addressing linkages between critical thinking and writing, in and across the disciplines, and it is especially interested in pieces that explore and report on connections between pedagogical theory and classroom practice. The journal also invites proposals from potential guest editors for specially themed volumes that fall within its focus and scope.

For more information, please visit the journal at http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh or through its listing at the WAC Clearinghouse at Colorado State University: http://wac.colostate.edu/


.

Deadline: March 11, 2017.

Sweetland Publication Prize in Digital Rhetoric.

URL: http://www.digitalrhetoriccollaborative.org/book-prize/
Deadline: February 1, 2017.
Contact Information
Contact: Mary Francis
Email: SweetlandDRCBooks@umich.edu
Mailing Address:

 

 

We are pleased to announce the call for submissions for the UMPress/Sweetland Publication Prize in Digital Rhetoric. We encourage submissions of completed or very near completion book-length projects that display critical and rigorous engagement in the field of digital rhetoric. For information about submissions, please visit the Call for Submissions: http://www.digitalrhetoriccollaborative.org/book-prize/

Please send submissions to Mary Francis, Editorial Director for the University of Michigan Press, and the DRC directors, using this email address: SweetlandDRCBooks@umich.edu.

The prize is open to scholars of all ranks, though preference is for first and single-author projects of younger scholars. A prize of $5000 will be awarded, along with an advance contract for publication in the series. The recipient will be announced on the DRC, U-M Press, and Sweetland websites, and at Computers and Writing 2017.

 

 

 

 


Creative Connectivity: 6th Biennial Conference on Critical Thinking and Writing.

URL: https://www.qu.edu/institutes-and-centers/writing-across-the-curriculum/biennial-conference/
Deadline: July 29, 2016.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta, Research and Writing Institute Director
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Phone: 203-582-8509
Mailing Address:

ABL N126, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT 06518

 

 

 

QUWAC and the Quinnipiac University Learning Commons are pleased to announce a call for presentations:


Creative Connectivity
6th Biennial International Critical Thinking and Writing Conference


Friday, November 18th, and Saturday, November 19, 2016
Quinnipiac University, Mt. Carmel Campus

Featuring the Keynote Address

The Meaningful Writing Project: A Site of Creative Connectivity

 

Michele Eodice, University of Oklahoma

Neal Lerner, Northeastern University

Anne Ellen Geller, St. John's University?


The speakers will be available for consultation on Saturday, November 19th.

Proposals are due Friday, July 29, 2016.

 

Our Theme: Connectivity in its diverse and expanding forms – technological, institutional, glob- al, social, neurobiological, linguistic, and textual - has a profound effect on the way we process, comprehend and apply what we learn. The exponential growth and complexity of knowledge, along with our virtually unlimited access to it, have en- hanced the need to make meaningful connections between what we know and what we seek to understand. In an educational environment that is increasingly dependent on the ability to forge connections, how are meaningful connections made? By whom and for whom are they made? How is the need for creative connectivity evidenced in the classroom? What role does connectivity play in the achievement of learning outcomes? 

 

Our conference theme, Creative Connectivity, is intended to explore the many ways that writing, as a critical and reflective practice, can be used to support the creation of deep and meaningful connections within and across the range of experiences that contribute to learning: first-year writing, disciplinary seminars, general education requirements, major and minor programs of study, professional internships, and co-curricular activities. We welcome presentations that explore pedagogical approaches to integrating writing in ways that 

 

  • articulate and witness commonalities and differences across a range of learning experiences
  • facilitate the application of language to thought, and thought to language
  • deepen understanding by observing synergies and distinctions among related course concepts
  • foster inquiry and reflection in ways that broaden knowledge and the opportunity to establish linkages across disciplinary divides
  • integrate co-curricular and curricular experiences
  • create new opportunities for faculty-to-faculty, student-to-faculty, and student to-student dialogue
  • identify and foster connections between student experiences, assignments, and outcomes
  • recognize and appreciate disciplinary distinctions; collaborate across disciplines, and create new modes of inquiry
  • connect thinking across a range of academic cultures and social media
  • bridge academic and professional identities 

Proposals can be submitted via email to the Research and Writing Institute director: paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu. We welcome individual and group proposals. Panel sessions will be 90 minutes to allow for discussion. Individual presentations will be limited to roughly 20 minutes each. 

 

Please include the following in your proposal:

 

  • ?Title of panel or presentation
  • Information about each presenter, including name, title, institutional affiliation, phone number and email.
  • 500-750 word abstract/session description 


Submission Deadline Extension for Double Helix Volume 4, "Critical Thinking and Writing in the Age of Globalization".

URL: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh
Deadline: June 1, 2016.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Phone: 203-582-8509
Mailing Address:

Quinnipiac University, 272 Mount Carmel Avenue, Hamden, CT 06518

 

 

 

 

Call for Submissions

Critical Thinking and Writing in the Age of Globalization

 

Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing

Volume 4 (2016)

Guest Editor: Tim John Moore

Tim John Moore is a Senior Lecturer in Academic Literacy and Linguistics at Swinburne University of Technology (AUS) and an Adjunct Research Associate in the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics at Monash University (AUS).  He is the author of Critical Thinking and Language: The Challenge of Generic Skills and Disciplinary Discourses, a founding member of the Association of Academic Language and Learning, and co-editor of the Journal of Academic Language and Learning.

The deadline for submissions is June 1, 2016.

 

Double Helix publishes work addressing linkages between critical thinking and writing, in and across the disciplines, and it is especially interested in pieces that explore and report on connections between pedagogical theory and classroom practice. 

 

Authors are invited to submit work for any of the following sections:

 

RESEARCH ARTICLES

5,000 to 10,000 words.

 

REPORTS FROM THE FIELD

2,500 to 5,000 words. Reports from the Field focus more exclusively on specific pedagogical practices and are less invested in theory than Research Articles. They address assignment design, instructor response, readings of student work, and evaluation criteria. Their modest length provides readers with an opportunity to learn quickly about a new practice and its implementation.

 

BOOK REVIEWS

750 to 1,800 words. DH accepts reviews submitted within two years of the book’s publication date.

 

LETTERS

Up to 750 words, in response to the special topic or cover image of the forthcoming volume or to any type of work appearing in the most recently published volume.

 

THE PROVOCATEUR

Of potentially any length and/or form, The Provocateur focuses on disrupting scholarly, institutional, and pedagogical conventions. Submissions for The Provocateur are reviewed by the Advisory Board.

 

All submissions should be made online at the journal site, which provides complete guidelines for authors: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/index


Critical Thinking and Writing in the Age of Globalization.

URL: http://://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/index
Deadline: March 31, 2016.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasqauretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Phone: 203-582-8509
Mailing Address:

Paul Pasquaretta

Research and Writing Institute

ABL-N121

Quinnipiac University

Hamden, CT 06518

Call for Submissions

Critical Thinking and Writing in the Age of Globalization

Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing

Volume 4 (2016)

Guest Editor: Tim John Moore

Globalization, understood as the expanding integration of economic, cultural, political, technological and social activities on a worldwide scale, presents challenges, opportunities, and crises, which can involve emerging literacies and changing modes of thought.  How might critical thinking and writing pedagogies shape and/or be shaped by this growing complexity?  DH welcomes the submission of work that both explores linkages of critical thinking and writing and considers how that work might contribute to, and perhaps to some extent define, the role of the university in the context of globalization.

 

 The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2016.

 

         All submissions should be made online at the journal site:

         http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/index

 

Tim John Moore is a Senior Lecturer in the area of Academic Literacy and Linguistics at Swinburne University of Technology (AUS) and an Adjunct Research Associate in the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics at Monash University (AUS).  He is the author of Critical Thinking and Language: The Challenge of Generic Skills and Disciplinary Discourses, a founding member of the Association of Academic Language and Learning, and co-editor of the Journal of Academic Language and Learning.


Job Announcement: Assistant Director, WAC Program.

Deadline: October 15, 2015.
Contact Information
Mailing Address:

Assistant Director

Writing Across the Curriculum Program

 

Application review begins October 15, 2015

Position open until filled

The University of Minnesota has opened a search for an Assistant Director of its well-established Writing Across the Curriculum Program. This position helps lead, track, and assess writing across the curriculum (WAC) and writing in the disciplines (WID) programs that include the pioneering intra-disciplinary Writing-Enriched Curriculum Program (WEC) and the interdisciplinary Teaching with Writing Program (TWW). For the WEC Program, s/he serves as lead contact, facilitator, and resource for academic departments engaged in a process of developing, implementing, and assessing comprehensive Undergraduate Writing Plans. For TWW, s/he designs, facilitates, and assesses interdisciplinary instructional support workshops and research-based discussions, facilitates faculty writing groups, and conducts one-to-one and small group instructional consultations.

 

We welcome applications from candidates who prize an opportunity to lend full-time attention to investigating and supporting effective writing instruction across academic disciplines and to facilitating quietly radical curricular and pedagogic transformations. This is an annually renewable position; salary commensurate with candidate's experience and qualifications. We will conduct a first round of interviews on campus or via Skype. Please apply online via the Employment System.

 

The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities is among the largest public research universities in the country, offering 53,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students a multitude of opportunities for study and research.  Our campus spreads across the heart of a vibrant, arts-rich, diverse, and eminently livable metropolitan community.  For more information, see http://umn.edu.

 

Minimum Qualifications: at time of application, candidate will have…

 

Desired Qualifications:  Preference will be given to candidates with…


Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing - Call for Submissions, Volume 3 (2015).

URL: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org
Deadline: March 28, 2015.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Phone: 203-582-8509
Mailing Address:

The Research and Writing Institute

ABL-N126

Quinnipiac University

275 Mount Carmel Avenue

Hamden, CT 06518

In 2008 The Times Literary Supplement included the publication of C. P. Snow’s 1959 Rede Lecture, The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution, on its list of the 100 books that have most influenced Western public discourse since the Second World War. Although Snow’s lecture prompted a dustup between scientists and literary elites over who could lay claim to the superior form of knowledge, over time the sides and tenor of the “Two Cultures Debate” have changed. As the debate has expanded throughout the natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences to include various disciplinary groups and the beliefs, attitudes, and perspectives with which they are bound together as “cultures,” it has evolved into a conversation about how knowledge is recognized, valued, and taught across the cultures of the university. DH invites submissions that explore pedagogical linkages between critical thinking and writing within the unfolding legacy of the Two Cultures Debate.

 

 Double Helix is an international, peer-reviewed journal of pedagogy. It welcomes

 

The deadline for submissions is March 28, 2015. For submission guidelines and other information, please visit the journal’s website: qudoublehelixjournal.org.


CFP: ATD Special Issue.

URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions.cfm
Deadline: January 15, 2015.
Contact Information
Contact: Neal Lerner and Elizabeth Boquet
Email: n.lerner@neu.edu and E.Boquet@fairfield.edu
Mailing Address:

Call for Proposals

A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Fall/Winter 2015

Writing Across the Curriculum and High-Impact Practices

Guest editors: Neal Lerner, Northeastern University

Elizabeth Boquet, Fairfield University


A central tenet of writing across the curriculum and in the disciplines is that the use of writing (or composing broadly understood, including speaking and visualizing) goes far beyond improvement of students’ skills. Instead, writing is essential to learning and to the processes of development that higher education aims to foster. What might not be as clear to those of us in WAC and WID programs is how we map the work we do on to these higher-level outcomes. We believe that one path is to look toward the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) research on High-Impact Practices.

The AAC&U defines High-Impact Practices as “an investment of time and energy over an extended period that has unusually positive effects on student engagement in educationally purposeful behavior” (Kuh, “Foreword” viii). More specifically, the AAC&U describes 10 types of experiences that research suggests contribute to transformational educational opportunities when made widely available to undergraduate students: First Year Seminars and Experiences; Common Intellectual Experiences; Learning Communities; Writing-Intensive Courses; Collaborative Assignments and Projects; Undergraduate Research; Diversity/Global Learning; Service Learning, Community-Based Learning; Internships; Capstone Courses and Projects.

WAC initiatives routinely deepen student learning by promoting or supporting many of these practices, and WAC programs are uniquely positioned at many institutions to integrate the localized efforts of individual courses, programs, and departments with the university’s broader goals related to academic engagement, as those goals are articulated in strategic plans, vision statements, accreditation reports and governance documents. However, the WAC/WID literature rarely conceptualizes these initiatives collectively nor does it regularly refer to the body of literature developing on these practices.

To that end, we invite proposals for articles integrating research, theory, and practices in the following areas, as well as others that explore the relationship between High-Impact Practices and Writing Across the Curriculum/Writing in the Disciplines. We seek articles that move beyond program description and that instead report on research, explore key questions, and/or wrestle with central tensions in these or related areas:

• Research on the relationship between the distinguishing features of High-Impact Practices and WAC/WID initiatives. (These features typically include frequent and significant contact with faculty, peers, material; contact with material in active-learning, novel, and culturally diverse settings; continuous feedback on performance; and integration, synthesis, and application of knowledge.)

• Research on efforts to incorporate WAC/WID into initiatives that support the distribution and scaffolding of High-Impact Practices across the undergraduate experience from the first year to graduation.

• Research that draws on WAC/WID principles to promote educational access, or to address gaps in access to, High-Impact Practices.

• Research on WAC/WID partnerships supporting High-Impact Practices at sites beyond campus (e.g. international, community, pre-college, workplace).

• Research that specifically engages with, responds to, or shapes nationally normed instruments (such as the National Survey on Student Engagement) in areas related to HIPs and WAC/WID.

We welcome proposals focused on these and other questions related to the intersections between WAC/WID and the AAC&U High-Impact Practices. We especially welcome collaborations between WAC scholars and other institutional stakeholders, such as writing programs and writing centers, offices of international programs, institutional research, academic advising, and community engagement; directors, staff, and faculty working with internships, libraries, and athletics; and other partners. 

Deadline for Proposals: January 15, 2015

Notification of Acceptance: February 15, 2015

Manuscripts Due: July 15, 2015

Publication: Fall/Winter 2015

Proposal Format: Please submit a one-page proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article, following the general guidelines for ATD at http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions.cfm. Send your proposal to guest editors Neal Lerner (n.lerner@neu.edu) and Elizabeth Boquet (E.Boquet@fairfield.edu), and also to ATD editor Michael Pemberton at michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu. Please provide full contact information with your submission.


Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Cultures: STEM, WAC/WID, and the Changing Academy.

URL: http://http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes-and-centers/writing-across-the-curriculum/biennial-conference/
Deadline: July 15, 2014.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Phone: 203-582-8509
Mailing Address:

ABL-N126

Quinnipiac University

Hamden, CT 06518

Call for Presentations:

Fifth Biennial International Critical Thinking and Writing Conference:

Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Culture: STEM, WAC/WID, and the Changing Academy

Friday, November 21st and Saturday, November 22nd,
 

In 2008 The Times Literary Supplement included the publication of C. P. Snow’s 1959 Rede Lecture, The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution, on its list of the 100 books that have most influenced Western public discourse since the Second World War.  Although Snow’s lecture prompted a dustup between scientists and literary elites over who could lay claim to the superior form of knowledge, over time the sides and tenor of the “Two Cultures Debate” have changed.  As the debate has expanded throughout the natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences to include various disciplinary groups and the beliefs, attitudes, and perspectives with which they are bound together as “cultures,” it has evolved into a conversation about how knowledge is recognized, valued, and taught across the cultures of the university.  The 2014 conference aims to advance this conversation through presentations that attend to the unfolding legacy of the Two Cultures Debate as well as those that revisit and challenge Snow’s original formulation.

Friday Evening Conversation:

Vaughan Turekian, Chief International Officer, American Association for the Advancement of Science

“Science Diplomacy: Critical Thinking and Writing across the Academy and the World,”

 

Dr. Vaughan Turekian is the Chief International Officer for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In this role, he leads, develops and coordinates the broad range of AAAS’s international activities. He is also the Director of AAAS’s Center for Science Diplomacy and Editor-in-Chief of Science & Diplomacy, a quarterly publication from the Center. Both the Center and the publication aim to bring together stakeholders from the scientific and foreign policy communities to identify better ways to apply science cooperation to building relationships between and among nations.

 

Saturday Morning Keynote:

Kathleen Blake Yancey, Kellogg W. Hunt Professor and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University

“Concepts and Practices in Flux: Critical thinking and Writing across the Disciplinary Cultures of the Academy.”

An elected leader of many scholarly organizations, including the National Council of Teachers of English; the Conference on College Composition and Communication; and the  Council of Writing Program Administrators, Kathleen Blake Yancey is Editor of College Composition and Communication and Co-Director of the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research. She has focused much of her research on writing across the curriculum and writing assessment, especially portfolios, authoring or co-authoring over 70 articles and book chapters and authoring, editing, or co-editing eleven scholarly books—among them Portfolios in the Writing Classroom, Reflection in the Writing Classroom, Assessing Writing across the Curriculum, and Portfolios 2.0. Her co-authored Writing across Contexts: Composition, Transfer, and Sites of Writing, a study of the role that content and reflection play in students’ transfer of writing knowledge and practice from first-year composition into multiple sites of writing across the university, will be published in spring 2014. Her numerous awards include the  Florida State University Award for Graduate Teaching, the WPA Best Book Award, and the Donald Murray Writing Prize.

 

 

Deadline for Proposals: Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 2014

The conference will be organized into three categories, each focusing on a different dimension of the

debate: Philosophy and Politics; Pedagogies, Programs, and Curricula; Critical Thinking and Writing.  While scholars and teachers are invited to submit proposals that engage in or with one of these dimensions of the debate, the conference intends to promote, across categories, a multidimensional conversation that addresses the following questions (and perhaps others):

 

How do linkages between critical thinking and writing operate within and/or even define a “culture” of the university?          

 

How do linkages between critical thinking and writing vary among cultures that exist as the    major divisions of knowledge (natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences), within the major divisions of knowledge (biology, literature, criminal justice, etc.), and across the major divisions of knowledge (science journalism, sports studies, medical humanities, etc.)?

 

How are linkages between critical thinking and writing shared across the cultures of the

      university?

 

How might linkages between critical thinking and writing influence and/or be influenced by the shifting cultures of the university?

 

How do linkages between critical thinking and writing interface with technology in and/or across the cultures of the university?

 

How might linkages between critical thinking and writing be part of integrating high school

      students and their prior knowledge into the cultures of the university?

 

How might linkages between critical thinking and writing aid in transfer of learning within and/or across the cultures of the university?

 

How might linkages between critical thinking and writing in and/or across the cultures of the  university prepare students for graduate and/or professional work?

 

Send your proposal to Paul Pasquaretta, coordinator of the Research and Writing Institute: paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu. We welcome both individual and group proposals. Panel sessions will be 90 minutes to allow for discussion; individual presentations will be limited to 20 minutes. Please include the following in your proposal:

 

Presenters are invited to submit their work for review for publication in the 2015 edition of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/index
 

For more information about “Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Cultures,” contact Paul Pasquaretta, coordinator of the Quinnipiac University Research and Writing Institute, at 203-582-8509, or paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu.


Job Posting: WAC/WID Teaching Consultant.

URL: https://employment.umn.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/search/Search_css.jsp
Deadline: June 23, 2014.

JOB POSTING

 

WAC/WID Teaching Consultant

 

Application review begins: June 23, 2014

Position open until filled

 

The University of Minnesota has opened a search for a Writing Across the Curriculum / Writing In the Disciplines Teaching Consultant.  Responsibilities of this position include co-leading our popular Teaching with Writing series and serving as key members of the Writing-Enriched Curriculum (WEC) project team.  This is an annually-renewable administrative position.  See full job description below. 

 

We welcome applications from candidates who prize an opportunity to lend full-time attention to investigating and supporting effective writing instruction and to facilitating quietly radical curricular transformations. These are annually renewable positions; salary commensurate with candidate experience and qualifications. We will conduct a first round of interviews on campus or via Skype. We hope to have the successful candidate in place by September, 2014.The priority deadline is June 23, 2014. Please apply online via the Employment System at: employment.umn.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=120877 or go to https://employment.umn.edu/ and enter requisition number 191632

 

More about the Teaching with Writing Series (TWW):  Since 2001,TWW has offered University of Minnesota faculty and instructors panel discussions and practical workshops on topics ranging from “Coaching the Capstone Project” to “Teaching with Writing in Five-Minutes” and from “What’s Grammar Got to Do with It?” to “Writing Instruction Meets the Large-Enrollment Course.”  It also includes provocative issues-oriented discussions, intensive multi-day seminars for faculty and graduate student instructors, and faculty writing retreats. Thousands of University instructors have participated in TWW events, a situation that has enabled us to develop a critical mass of faculty members and instructors committed to infusing intentional and relevant writing instruction into their courses. This is a significant achievement at a large, public, research university.

 

More about the Writing-Enriched Curriculum Project (WEC):  An interest in supporting optimal infusion of relevant writing and writing instruction within undergraduate curricula led us to develop the innovative WEC model in 2007.  Since then, we’ve engaged 45 departments in a process of partnering with faculty as they generate, implement, and assess unit-specific and long-term undergraduate Writing Plans. For more information, see http://wec.umn.edu.

 

More about the Center for Writing: The Center’s mission of enhancing student learning, improving writing instruction, and deepening our understanding of literacy and the writing process, is achieved by five coordinated programs.  In addition to Writing Across the Curriculum, we offer Student Writing Support (face-to-face and online writing consultations), the Minnesota Writing Project (a branch of the National Writing Project), Interdisciplinary Studies of Writing (a literacy-oriented research grants program), and a free-standing Literacy and Rhetorical Studies minor.  For more information, see: http://writing.umn.edu.

 

More about the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities is among the largest public research universities in the country, offering 53,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students a multitude of opportunities for study and research.  Our campus spreads across the heart of a vibrant, arts-rich, diverse, and eminently livable metropolitan community.  For more information, see http://umn.edu.

 

More about the position:

 

Writing Across the Curriculum Teaching Consultant

Full-time, annually renewable

Classification: Education Specialist series 9931


Start date: September 2014


1. Serve as a core member of the Writing-Enriched Curriculum (WEC) team

 

2. Manage and serve as lead facilitator and instructional consultant for WAC workshops, discussions, and consultations  

3.  Contribute to WAC scholarship locally, regionally, and nationally   

Minimum Qualifications: at time of application, candidate will have…

 

Desired Qualifications:  Preference will be given to candidates with…


Application Instructions:

The priority deadline is June 23, 2014. Please apply online via the Employment System at: https://employment.umn.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/search/Search_css.jsp   Enter requisition number 191632


Deadline Extension for Special STEM Issue of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing .

URL: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh.
Deadline: May 23, 2014.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Phone: 203-582-8509
Mailing Address:

Quinnipiac University

ABL-N126

Hamden, CT 06518

Volume 2 (2014): Critical Thinking and Writing in the STEM Disciplines

Guest Editor: Lisa Emerson, Massey University (N.Z.)

Double Helix is an international journal devoted to linkages between critical thinking and writing in and across the disciplines, and is particularly interested in pieces that explore and report on connections between pedagogical theory and classroom practice. For this issue on STEM, we are especially interested in those pieces that address the following concerns at the nexus of critical thinking and writing:

In addition to research articles on these topics (5000-10,000 words), the journal is interested in publishing reports from the field (2,500-5,000 words), book reviews (750-1,000 words), and letters (up to 500 words). The editors also seek submissions to The Provocateur section of the journal, which publishes pieces that disrupt scholarly, institutional, and pedagogical conventions.

Lisa Emerson is an Associate Professor in the School of English and Media Studies at Massey University, New Zealand, where she teaches science writing and writing for technology. A winner of the Prime Minister’s Supreme Award for excellence in teaching, Dr. Emerson has published widely on both scientists' engagement with writing and integrating writing into the science curriculum. She is currently working on an international project - the lifecycle of the scientific writer - which explores the beliefs, attitudes, experiences and development of mathematicians and scientists as writers. The deadline for submissions is Friday, May 23rd, 2014. For submission guidelines and other information, please visit the journal’s website: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh.

Queries may be directed to Paul Pasquaretta, the journal manager, at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu.


Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Cultures: STEM, WAC/WID and the Changing Academy.

Deadline: April 21, 2014.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu
Phone: 203-582-8509
Mailing Address:

ABL-N126

Quinnipiac University

Hamden, CT 06518

Call for Presentations:

Fifth Biennial International Critical Thinking and Writing Conference:

Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Culture: STEM, WAC/WID, and the Changing Academy

Friday, November 21st and Saturday, November 22nd,
Quinnipiac University, 275 Mount Carmel Avenue, Hamden, CT 06518

Hosted by QUWAC and the RWI, with support from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Office of Academic Affairs

In 2008 The Times Literary Supplement included the publication of C. P. Snow’s 1959 Rede Lecture, The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution, on its list of the 100 books that have most influenced Western public discourse since the Second World War.  Although Snow’s lecture prompted a dustup between scientists and literary elites over who could lay claim to the superior form of knowledge, over time the sides and tenor of the “Two Cultures Debate” have changed.  As the debate has expanded throughout the natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences to include various disciplinary groups and the beliefs, attitudes, and perspectives with which they are bound together as “cultures,” it has evolved into a conversation about how knowledge is recognized, valued, and taught across the cultures of the university.  The 2014 conference aims to advance this conversation through presentations that attend to the unfolding legacy of the Two Cultures Debate as well as those that revisit and challenge Snow’s original formulation.

Friday Evening Conversation:

Vaughan Turekian, Chief International Officer, American Association for the Advancement of Science

“Science Diplomacy: Critical Thinking and Writing across the Academy and the World,”

Dr. Vaughan Turekian is the Chief International Officer for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In this role, he leads, develops and coordinates the broad range of AAAS’s international activities. He is also the Director of AAAS’s Center for Science Diplomacy and Editor-in-Chief of Science & Diplomacy, a quarterly publication from the Center. Both the Center and the publication aim to bring together stakeholders from the scientific and foreign policy communities to identify better ways to apply science cooperation to building relationships between and among nations.

 

Saturday Morning Keynote:

Kathleen Blake Yancey, Kellogg W. Hunt Professor and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University

“Concepts and Practices in Flux: Critical thinking and Writing across the Disciplinary Cultures of the Academy.”

An elected leader of many scholarly organizations—including the National Council of Teachers of English; the Conference on College Composition and Communication; and the  Council of Writing Program Administrators—Kathleen Blake Yancey is Editor of College Composition and Communication and Co-Director of the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research. She has focused much of her research on writing across the curriculum and writing assessment, especially portfolios, authoring or co-authoring over 70 articles and book chapters and authoring, editing, or co-editing eleven scholarly books—among them Portfolios in the Writing Classroom, Reflection in the Writing Classroom, Assessing Writing across the Curriculum, and Portfolios 2.0. Her co-authored Writing across Contexts: Composition, Transfer, and Sites of Writing, a study of the role that content and reflection play in students’ transfer of writing knowledge and practice from first-year composition into multiple sites of writing across the university, will be published in spring 2014. Her numerous awards include the  Florida State University Award for Graduate Teaching, the WPA Best Book Award, and the Donald Murray Writing Prize.

 

Deadline for Proposals: Friday, May 23, 2014

The conference will be organized into three categories, each focusing on a different dimension of the

debate: Philosophy and Politics; Pedagogies, Programs, and Curricula; Critical Thinking and Writing.  While scholars and teachers are invited to submit proposals that engage in or with one of these dimensions of the debate, the conference intends to promote, across categories, a multidimensional conversation that addresses the following questions (and perhaps others):

How do linkages between critical thinking and writing operate within and/or even define a “culture” of the university?          

How do linkages between critical thinking and writing vary among cultures that exist as the    major divisions of knowledge (natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences), within the major divisions of knowledge (biology, literature, criminal justice, etc.), and across the major divisions of knowledge (science journalism, sports studies, medical humanities, etc.)?

How are linkages between critical thinking and writing shared across the cultures of the

      university?

How might linkages between critical thinking and writing influence and/or be influenced by the shifting cultures of the university?

How do linkages between critical thinking and writing interface with technology in and/or across the cultures of the university?

How might linkages between critical thinking and writing be part of integrating high school

      students and their prior knowledge into the cultures of the university?

How might linkages between critical thinking and writing aid in transfer of learning within and/or across the cultures of the university?

How might linkages between critical thinking and writing in and/or across the cultures of the  university prepare students for graduate and/or professional work?

 

Send your proposal to Paul Pasquaretta, coordinator of the Research and Writing Institute: paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu. We welcome both individual and group proposals. Panel sessions will be 90 minutes to allow for discussion; individual presentations will be limited to 20 minutes. Please include the following in your proposal:

 

Presenters are invited to submit their work for review for publication in the 2015 edition of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/index
 

For more information about “Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Cultures,” contact Paul Pasquaretta, coordinator of the Quinnipiac University Research and Writing Institute, at 203-582-8509, or paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu.


Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Cultures: STEM, WAC/WID and the Changing Academy.

URL: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/institutes-and-centers/writing-across-the-curriculum/biennial-conference/
Deadline: April 21, 2014.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Phone: 203-582-8509
Fax: 203-582-8970
Mailing Address:

ABL-N126

Quinnipiac University

Hamden, CT 06518

Call for Presentations:

Fifth Biennial International Critical Thinking and Writing Conference:

Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Culture: STEM, WAC/WID, and the Changing Academy

Friday, November 21st and Saturday, November 22nd
Quinnipiac University, 275 Mount Carmel Avenue, Hamden, CT 06518


Hosted by QUWAC and the RWI, with support from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Office of Academic Affairs

 

In 2008 The Times Literary Supplement included the publication of C. P. Snow’s 1959 Rede Lecture, The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution, on its list of the 100 books that have most influenced Western public discourse since the Second World War.  Although Snow’s lecture prompted a dustup between scientists and literary elites over who could lay claim to the superior form of knowledge, over time the sides and tenor of the “Two Cultures Debate” have changed.  As the debate has expanded throughout the natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences to include various disciplinary groups and the beliefs, attitudes, and perspectives with which they are bound together as “cultures,” it has evolved into a conversation about how knowledge is recognized, valued, and taught across the cultures of the university.  The 2014 conference aims to advance this conversation through presentations that attend to the unfolding legacy of the Two Cultures Debate as well as those that revisit and challenge Snow’s original formulation.

Friday Evening Conversation:

Vaughan Turekian, Chief International Officer, American Association for the Advancement of Science

“Science Diplomacy: Critical Thinking and Writing across the Academy and the World,”

Dr. Vaughan Turekian is the Chief International Officer for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In this role, he leads, develops and coordinates the broad range of AAAS’s international activities. He is also the Director of AAAS’s Center for Science Diplomacy and Editor-in-Chief of Science & Diplomacy, a quarterly publication from the Center. Both the Center and the publication aim to bring together stakeholders from the scientific and foreign policy communities to identify better ways to apply science cooperation to building relationships between and among nations.

 

Saturday Morning Keynote:

Kathleen Blake Yancey, Kellogg W. Hunt Professor and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University

“Concepts and Practices in Flux: Critical thinking and Writing across the Disciplinary Cultures of the Academy.”

An elected leader of many scholarly organizations—including the National Council of Teachers of English; the Conference on College Composition and Communication; and the  Council of Writing Program Administrators—Kathleen Blake Yancey is Editor of College Composition and Communication and Co-Director of the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research. She has focused much of her research on writing across the curriculum and writing assessment, especially portfolios, authoring or co-authoring over 70 articles and book chapters and authoring, editing, or co-editing eleven scholarly books—among them Portfolios in the Writing Classroom, Reflection in the Writing Classroom, Assessing Writing across the Curriculum, and Portfolios 2.0. Her co-authored Writing across Contexts: Composition, Transfer, and Sites of Writing, a study of the role that content and reflection play in students’ transfer of writing knowledge and practice from first-year composition into multiple sites of writing across the university, will be published in spring 2014. Her numerous awards include the  Florida State University Award for Graduate Teaching, the WPA Best Book Award, and the Donald Murray Writing Prize.

 

Deadline for Proposals: Friday, May 23, 2014

The conference will be organized into three categories, each focusing on a different dimension of the

debate: Philosophy and Politics; Pedagogies, Programs, and Curricula; Critical Thinking and Writing.  While scholars and teachers are invited to submit proposals that engage in or with one of these dimensions of the debate, the conference intends to promote, across categories, a multidimensional conversation that addresses the following questions (and perhaps others):

Send your proposal to Paul Pasquaretta, coordinator of the Research and Writing Institute: paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu. We welcome both individual and group proposals. Panel sessions will be 90 minutes to allow for discussion; individual presentations will be limited to 20 minutes. Please include the following in your proposal:

 

Presenters are invited to submit their work for review for publication in the 2015 edition of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/index
 

For more information about “Thinking and Writing Beyond Two Cultures,” contact Paul Pasquaretta, coordinator of the Quinnipiac University Research and Writing Institute, at 203-582-8509, or paul.pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu.


Deadline Extension for Special STEM Issue of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing.

URL: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh
Deadline: March 24, 2014.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu
Phone: 203-582-8509
Mailing Address:
Quinnipiac University

ABL-N126

Hamden, CT 06518

Dear Colleagues,

The deadline for submissions to the special STEM issue of Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing has been extended to Friday, May 23rd. Details of the call are below; please share them with your associates across the disciplines.
 
Call for Papers:

Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing
Volume 2 (2014): Critical Thinking and Writing in the STEM Disciplines
Guest Editor: Lisa Emerson, Massey University (N.Z.)

Double Helix is an international journal devoted to linkages between critical thinking and writing in and across the disciplines, and is particularly interested in pieces that explore and report on connections between pedagogical theory and classroom practice. For this issue on STEM, we are especially interested in those pieces that address the following concerns at the nexus of critical thinking and writing:

-the role of language in the construction of scientific and mathematical knowledge
-the impact of oral discourse on scientific and mathematical knowledge
-the engagement of students with and their enculturation into practices of STEM disciplines
-the boundaries of STEM discourse

In addition to research articles on these topics (5000-10,000 words), the journal is interested in publishing reports from the field (2,500-5,000 words), book reviews (750-1,000 words), and letters (up to 500 words). The editors also seek submissions to The Provocateur section of the journal, which publishes pieces that disrupt scholarly, institutional, and pedagogical conventions.

Lisa Emerson is an Associate Professor in the School of English and Media Studies at Massey University, New Zealand, where she teaches science writing and writing for technology. A winner of the Prime Minister’s Supreme Award for excellence in teaching, Dr. Emerson has published widely on both scientists' engagement with writing and integrating writing into the science curriculum. She is currently working on an international project - the lifecycle of the scientific writer - which explores the beliefs, attitudes, experiences and development of mathematicians and scientists as writers.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, May 23, 2014. For submission guidelines and other information, please visit the journal’s website: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh.

Queries may be directed to Paul Pasquaretta, the journal manager, at Paul.Pasquaretta@Quinnipiac.Edu.


CFP for Across the Disciplines: TAs and the Teaching of Writing Across the Curriculum.

URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions.cfm
Deadline: February 15, 2014.
Contact Information
Contact: Tanya Rodrigue and Andrea Williams
Email: trodrigue@salemstate.edu and al.williams@utoronto.ca
Mailing Address:

Call for Proposals

A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Spring/Fall 2015

TAs and the Teaching of Writing Across the Curriculum

Guest editors: Tanya K. Rodrigue, Salem State University

                      Andrea L. Williams, University of Toronto

 

Graduate Teaching Assistants (TAs) play a key role in helping students learn how to write in the disciplines. TAs who teach their own courses are responsible for all facets of student learning, including the instruction and assessment of writing. Even when they are not the instructors of record, TAs are often the official or unofficial writing instructor for courses. Undergraduate students rely heavily on TAs to answer questions and provide guidance about their written work. In addition, TAs help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills in recitations, labs, and in face-to-face and online consultations. For all intents and purposes, many TAs across the disciplines are de facto teachers of writing.

 

Despite the important role many TAs play in teaching writing, relatively little scholarly work discusses their role or potential role in WAC. Most of what we know about disciplinary TAs and the teaching of writing emerges from anecdotal evidence passed along by faculty or TAs at our own institutions, or from talk among colleagues at conferences. However, sustained discussion and research about disciplinary TAs in WAC is essential. With crunched budgets, dwindling faculty positions, and larger class sizes, the number of graduate instructors is rising dramatically. In fact, in some institutions, TAs even outnumber faculty: in 2007, TAs at public research/doctoral granting institutions in the US comprised 41 percent of instructional staff while faculty made up 28.9 percent (US Department of Education Report, 2009). These statistics speak to the growing role TAs are likely playing in disciplinary writing instruction and the critical role they play in achieving the goals of the WAC movement.

 

The guest editors of this issue of ATD invite proposals that explore theoretical, pedagogical, practical, and administrative issues that attend to TAs as writing instructors across the disciplines. We are seeking articles based on qualitative or quantitative research, such as case studies, surveys, ethnographies or narrative inquiry, in local, national or international contexts. Research may document WAC programs with active TA participation on a local, regional, or national scale, describe/critique WAC TA training and professional development programs, or explore the diverse ways in which TAs take on the role of writing instructors in various contexts. We are also open to theoretical and pedagogical pieces that shed light on TAs' disciplinary enculturation, and the effects this enculturation has on the teaching and assessment of writing in WAC programs. The guest editors hope to receive proposals from faculty and TAs that address the various forms of disciplinary graduate student involvement in writing instruction in multiple contexts. Proposals may address questions such as the following:

 

·      What does a TA writing pedagogy across different disciplines look like, both within and outside of, formal WAC programs, and in local, national, or international settings?

·      What does scholarly research reveal about best practices for building and sustaining WAC programs with TA participants?

·      What are current models of WAC TA professional development and how do these models prepare disciplinary TAs to achieve WAC goals?

·      What does a cross-institutional study reveal about how WAC administrators address TA resistance in training and professional development?

·      How might institutional forces, administration, disciplinary faculty, disciplinary histories, English departments, TA unions/organized labor, or teaching and learning centers play a role in developing or maintaining WAC programs with graduate instructor participants?

·      What factors contribute to how disciplinary TAs identify (or do not identify) themselves as writing instructors? What role does training and development play in this identity formation?

·      How do TAs' own disciplinary writing practices and knowledge prepare them for working with undergraduate student writers? In what ways does this knowledge inform their writing pedagogy?

·      How do TAs involved in writing instruction position themselves as nascent-experts (both in the discipline and as disciplinary writing instructors) when they themselves are still in the process of disciplinary enculturation?

·      In what ways might writing center theory, assessment research, or other theoretical and professional perspectives offer insight into the roles TAs play in WAC programs?

 

These questions are meant to provide a general direction for articles.  Proposals for related topics and issues are most welcome.

 

Deadline for Proposals: February 15, 2014

 

Notification of Acceptance: March 15, 2014

 

Manuscripts Due: August 15, 2014

 

Publication: Spring 2015

 

Proposal Format: Please submit a one-page proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article, following the general guidelines for ATD at http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions.cfm.  Send your proposal to guest editors Tanya Rodrigue (trodrigue@salemstate.edu) and Andrea Williams (al.williams@utoronto.ca), and also toATD editor Michael Pemberton at michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu.  Please provide full contact information with your submission.

 


CFP: Special Issue of Across the Disciplines.

URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions.cfm
Deadline: November 1, 2012.
Contact Information
Contact: Jessie Blackburn
Email: jbb35@pitt.edu

Call for Proposals

A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Spring 2014 WAC/WID Program Administration at Rural, Regional, and/or Satellite Institutions

Guest editors: Jessie Blackburn, The University of Pittsburgh, Bradford, and Heidi Skurat Harris, Eastern Oregon University

Rural, regional, and/or satellite college and university campuses face shrinking budgets alongside increasing demands to educate and prepare students for twenty-first century technologies and workplaces. In these environments, rural WAC or WID program administrators are asked to provide multimodal professional and program development, encourage instructional technology use, redesign and modernize curriculum, and redefine assessment strategies in blended and online courses throughout the disciplines. Yet little research examines twenty-first century WAC or WID work at rural, regional, and/or satellite institutions where technology access, budget limitations, first-generation learners and teachers, and contingent faculty development are often constrained by institutional settings or community/regional pressures. Scholarship focused on the work of rural WAC/WID programs in the twenty-first century is especially important in light of the Obama administration’s recent appropriation of $182 million in federal stimulus money to expand high-speed Internet networks in underprivileged rural communities in Appalachia, New England, Alaska, Arizona, and other remote areas of the country that are often considered at risk as a result of the “digital divide” or “participation gap.”

In an effort to fill this scholarly void as well as support rural and remote WPAs charged with digitizing their WAC or WID curricula, this special issue of Across the Disciplines will be anchored around three pivotal questions: (1) What unique material and/or philosophical constraints do rural WAC/WID programs face in the twenty-first century? (2) What are the processes through which rural WAC/WID program administrators secure adequate program resources and provide professional development for faculty across the disciplines? (3) How can writing program administrators and college and university faculty leverage multimodal composition to help provide rural institutions, students, faculty, and the communities around them new and unique opportunities for literacy development across and beyond the curriculum? In particular, this issue will focus on the role of the rural WPA charged with the professional development of faculty and/or the digitization of curricula in writing across the curriculum programs.

The guest editors invite proposals for articles that highlight innovative ideas from a variety of rural WAC/WID faculty; practical, qualitative experience from rural WPAs in the digital era; and case studies of successful and not so successful WPAs and faculty who have attempted to increase literacy—particularly techno-literacy—in their classrooms, across the disciplines, and in their communities. While we especially invite proposals that engage new literacies in rural WAC/WID programs, we also invite proposals that seek to explore rural WAC programs in general at branch, regional, or satellite institutions or writing centers. We invite proposals that explore the following:

 

We welcome proposals focused on these and other questions related to rural WPA work in WAC/WID programs. We also welcome collaborations among WAC scholars, community literacy administrators, and faculty from fields “outside of” (yet incorporating) composition.

Deadline for Proposals: November 1, 2012

Notification of Acceptance: by January 2013

Manuscripts Due: May 1, 2013

Publication: Spring 2014

Proposal Format: Please submit a one-page proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article. Proposals and manuscripts should follow guidelines for Across the Disciplines (http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions.cfm). Send your proposal electronically (in MS Word format) to guest editors Jessie Blackburn at jbb35@pitt.edu, Heidi Skurat Harris at hharris@eou.edu, and the editor of ATD, Michael Pemberton (michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu). Please be sure to include your full contact information.


Academic Exchange Quarterly Winter 2012 Issue.

URL: http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/center2.htm
Deadline: August 31, 2012.
Contact Information
Contact: Kellie Charron
Email: kajr10@comcast.net

 

The Winter 2012 (Vol. 16, Iss. 4) Issue of Academic Exchange Quarterly is now accepting submissions for its special section on Writing Center Theory and Practice.  Articles may explore issues of theory, practice, and experience in writing center work, including qualitative and empirical studies and discussions of pedagogy.

Articles may also consider the following: How writing center professionals cope with change and the eventuality of needing to expand their efforts in response to new economic and demographic challenges.  Furthermore, as we move towards increasingly viral and technologically dependent learning communities, how can these efforts help meet the evolving demands of our students? 

In addition to Writing Center Directors and other Administrators, submissions are also welcome from professional staff, faculty tutors, and graduate students who work in the writing center.  Manuscript length should be between 2,000 and 3,000 words.  Please identify your submission with the keyword “Center-2.”

Submissions will be accepted now until the end of August; however, early submissions are encouraged as they offer the following incentives:

-   opportunity to be considered for Editor’s Choice

-   eligibility to have article’s abstract and/or full text posted on journal’s main webpage

-   opportunity to be considered for inclusion in Sound Instruction Series

For more information, please visit http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/center2.htm, or email Feature Editor Kellie Charron at kajr10@comcast.net


CFP: Special issue of ATD on Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum.

URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions.cfm
Deadline: June 1, 2012.
Contact Information
Contact: Alice Horning
Email: horning@oakland.edu
Mailing Address:

 

 

 

Call for Proposals
A special issue of Across the Disciplines, Spring/Fall 2013
 
Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum
 
Guest editor: Alice Horning, Oakland University
 
When faculty members are asked what they consider the single greatest problem they face in their classrooms on a daily basis, they almost always include reading as a key issue.  Faculty comments reflect what could be described as the “don’t, won’t, can’t” problem.  That is, students don’t read in the ways that faculty expect, and they won’t unless faculty find ways to force or coerce reading compliance.  Underlying these two significant aspects of the problem is a third, much bigger problem, which is that many students are not able read in the ways faculty would like.  Qualitative and quantitative studies such as Jolliffe and Harl’s analysis of students’ reading journals at the University of Arkansas and ACT’s 2006 study, relating ACT reading performance to success in college among 563,000 students, support the idea that students lack the reading skills needed to do college work successfully. This situation is becoming increasingly serious in the face of ever larger amounts of material available in print and online that faculty expect students to read, comprehend, and critically assess.  Understanding and addressing the “don’t, won’t, can’t” problem is everyone’s job, in every course, in every discipline.  In this special issue of Across the Disciplines, we invite proposals for articles that explore this issue across disciplines, along the following (and other possible) lines:
 
 
These questions are meant to provide a general direction for articles.  Proposals for related topics and issues are most welcome.
 
Deadline for Proposals: June 1, 2012
 
Notification of Acceptance: July 2012
 
Manuscripts Due: December 15, 2012
 
Publication: Fall 2013
 
Proposal Format: Please submit a one-page proposal explaining your topic, the research and theoretical base on which you will draw, and your plans for the structure of your article, following the general guidelines for ATD athttp://wac.colostate.edu/atd/submissions.cfm.  Send your proposal to Alice Horning, guest editor, at horning@oakland.edu, and also to ATD editor Michael Pemberton at michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu.  Provide full contact information with your submission.


CFP for Across the Disciplines: Anti-Racism Activism.

URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/
Deadline: September 1, 2011.
Contact Information
Contact: Michael Pemberton
Email: michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu
Mailing Address:

 Call for Proposals: A special issue of Across the Disciplines (http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/), Spring/Fall 2012

Anti-Racist Activism: Teaching Rhetoric and Writing

Guest editors: Frankie Condon, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; and Vershawn Ashanti Young, University of Kentucky

Despite widely circulated pronouncements of the death of racism in the U.S. following the election of President Barack Obama, politicians continue to appeal to race as a means of galvanizing their (predominantly white) bases, legislation across the States taps into deeply held racist beliefs and connects those beliefs with notions of citizenship and national identity, and efforts are underway nationwide to limit the ability of teachers and students to study the history of race and racism in the U.S. as well as the cultural and scholarly production of artists and intellectuals of color. Teachers of color, particularly those most expert and experienced in teaching English as a Second Language,  and who speak and write World Englishes are being castigated in public and exiled from their classrooms. Indeed, racist logics and rhetorics are morphing rapidly such that explicit racism in public discourse is not only frequently overlooked but also rationalized and legitimated, and implicit (coded) racism continues unabated as what clinical psychologist Derald Sue Wing et al. term “racial microaggressions of everyday life” (largely unintentional racial insults and exclusions) or as what Tim Wise has termed “racism 2.0 or enlightened exceptionalism.” (Young, Present Tense, v1 Issue 1, 2010)    

The editors of this special issue of ATD perceive a pressing need to continue and deepen a critical dialogue about race matters, particularly as they pertain to the teaching of rhetoric and writing. To this end, we invite artists and teachers, intellectuals and scholars from two broad sites — disciplinary (e.g., critical pedagogy, English studies, gender studies, performance studies, writing center studies, writing in the disciplines, and teacher development, etc.) and public (writing groups, performance troupes, after school programs, literacy centers, etc) — where writing takes place to join us in keeping the dialogue alive.

We are particularly interested in essays that are richly informed by activist epistemologies, critical autoethnography, performance ethnography, models of anti-bias organizing, critical race theory, and theories of intersectionality (race, class, gender, sexuality). Subjects for articles submitted for consideration might include (but need not be limited to):
 
CRITICAL THEORY/PRACTICE/PERFORMANCE
 
•        anti-racist, anti-phobic praxis in  writing intensive multidisciplinary classrooms (particularly articles that explore the junctions and disjunctions of performance/enactment of theory/practice)

•        rich or thick descriptions of writing performances and course design, including teaching principles or teaching philosophies, learning goals, syllabi and assignments, student and/or participant engagement, writing, and feedback

•        rich or thick description of program design or revision including shifting explicit and implicit program missions, curricula design

•        cultivation or organizing of faculty engagement across disciplines and communities, and/or teacher or facilitator development

•        rich or thick description and critical analyses of multi-racial, multi-gender, cross-class, multigenerational collaborations, teaching partnerships, or organizing of writing events

•        rich or thick description of community action research informed by anti-racist, anti-phobic organizing models, leadership theories, activism and/or performance.

•        critical or theoretically grounded narratives of teaching, learning, performing, researching and writing as raced, gendered, classed, sexualized subjects

We are also interested in co-authored essays that explore connections between the academy and community, across disciplines, and among those who occupy different institutional roles or positions (i.e. faculty and community agencies partnerships, faculty and graduate student writing partnerships, partnerships between colleagues across disciplines, multi-racial writing partnerships, and/or partnerships between engaged administrators and faculty or graduate students).  

Since ATD is an online journal, authors are not limited to traditional essay formats, but may engage writing that includes images, video, and footage, or that otherwise performs the argument. Our hope is that this issue will principally inform and enrich anti-racist education through the teaching of rhetoric and writing.

Deadline for Submission of Manuscripts: September 1, 2011

Notification of Acceptance and Requests for Revision: by November 1, 2011

Final Manuscripts Due: December 15, 2011

Publication: Spring/Fall 2012

Proposal Format: Emailed queries regarding topics, research and theoretical bases, and the structure of proposed articles are welcome. Manuscript drafts submitted for consideration should follow APA documentation style, which is the standard for Across the Disciplines. Send your manuscript electronically (in MS Word format) to guest editors Frankie Condon and Vershawn Ashanti Young (atdantiracism@gmail.com) and the editor of ATD, Michael Pemberton (michaelp@georgiasouthern.edu). Please be sure to include your full contact information. Submissions will be peer reviewed.


Preparing New Leaders for the Multicultural, Digital, and Global Era of the "Digital Platform".

Deadline: August 1, 2011.
Contact Information
Contact: Donald Pardlow
Email: dpardlow@claflin.edu

The writer Daniel Pink prophesizes widely on what he describes as a cultural transition from our era—an “Age of Information,” to an alleged “Age of Conception,” a transition which has induced educators in British and in many Southeast Asian countries to attempt to inculcate creativity in their students in order to better prepare them for competition in the global marketplace. One symptom of this new age, the development of a global cyber network, or what Thomas Friedman calls the “digital platform,” has given to each and every entrepreneur the potential to expand his or her trade and sale of services and products to consumers worldwide, making those marketplaces more competitive on a global scale.

In response to this challenge, the Historically Black University (HBCU) Claflin University has set a goal known as the Claflin Imperative, which “[prepares] students for leadership and service in a multicultural, global, and technological society.” Furthermore, for each of the past ten years the university has hosted the Claflin University Conference on Contemporary English and Language Arts Pedagogy to give local and regional educators a chance to share and to keep abreast of the latest developments in language teaching. Former contributors to the conference are invited to submit proposals for (1) a section on the history of the conference. Faculty (and former faculty) of any HCBU are invited to submit proposals for (2) a section of pedagogy practices used at HCBU’s. Moreover, faculties at every type of institution are invited to submit proposals for (3) a section on mainstream pedagogies used to prepare students for mounting the digital platform.

Editors: Donald Pardlow, Sharynn Etheridge, Susan Till, and Mary Alice Trent, Claflin University

Preliminary abstracts of 300 words or less should be sent by August 1, 2011. Possible subjects include but are not limited to the areas of foreign-language pedagogy, classical rhetoric, language acquisition, computer literacy, creative-writing pedagogy, creativity, assessment, portfolios, service learning, literary studies, literary criticism, writing across the curriculum, writing program administration, writing center administration, and basic writing. Accepted manuscripts(due by October 31, 2011) should be written between 2500 and 6250 words, should be written in the current MLA format, and should be sent electronically in Word or a Word-compatible format (.doc, .docx, or .rtf) to Donald Pardlow (dpardlow@claflin.edu).


2011 BWe Special Issue: Multimodal Composing.

URL: http://orgs.tamu-commerce.edu/BWE/
Deadline: October 15, 2010.
Contact Information
Contact: Barbara Gleason
Email: inquiries: bgleason@ccny.cuny.edu submissions: bwespecialissue@gmail.com

Multimodal Composing:
Opportunities and Challenges in Basic Writing Contexts
 
Basic Writing Electronic (BWe) Journal
Guest Editor: Barbara Gleason
 
                        Traditional print essays (8-15 pages) and webtexts &
                        other multimodal/digital compositions are welcome.
 
                        Submission Deadline: October 15, 2010
                        Send inquiries to bgleason@ccny.cuny.edu
                        Submit manuscripts to bwespecialissue@gmail.com
 
For the upcoming issue of BWe, we seek essays on multimodal writing in college and pre-college composition and rhetoric classes. As Cynthia Selfe argues in the June 2009 issue of College Composition and Communication, our profession's continuing tendency to focus primarily on print literacy limits our understanding of rhetoric, discourages students from "identify[ing] their own communication needs" and needlessly limits individuals who have developed expressive identities in a digital age ("The Movement of Air, The Breath of Meaning: Aurality and Multimodal Composing" in CCC, June 2009, 618). By widening the possibilities for composing in their classrooms, instructors may establish more compelling and inclusive learning environments for students of diverse races and cultures, language backgrounds, ages, and communication interests. Teachers also may create classes that can better serve the needs of students who have learning differences, e.g., in the areas of vision, hearing, or attention.
 
Along with the potential advantages of incorporating multiple modes of composing into their curricula, instructors may well experience challenges that can obstruct curricular change or dampen enthusiasm of both instructors and students. Integrating new technologies into classes sometimes creates unwanted hurdles.  Instructors may experience new technologies as more burdensome than beneficial, especially when faculty are not rewarded for integrating new communication technologies into their curricula. In addition, educational institutions are increasingly demanding that digital texts and multimodal composing options be integrated into their curricula--sometimes before they have acquired the funds or the staff to support these efforts. We already know that we are experiencing a major transformation in communications that is permeating both our daily lives and our institutional realities. Most of us are struggling to develop our own expertise in multimodal composing while simultaneously teaching others to compose in digital environments.
 
We encourage prospective authors to consider both opportunities and challenges associated with teaching/learning multimodal composing. We hope to receive submissions that focus on one (or more than one) of these roles/perspectives: writer, student, teacher, tutor, program administrator. We also welcome reviews of books & web sites that enhance instructors' knowledge of teaching with new technologies OR that facilitate adult learners' expertise in multimodal composing. Finally, since basic writing instruction is moving into new venues (e.g., as test-preparation courses in for-profit companies or in adult education programs), we welcome submissions that explore uses of multimodal composing in a variety of institutional environments.
 
            All submissions must be submitted electronically.
                 Both multimodal texts and traditional print essays are welcome.
                 Print essays should be saved in Word or in Rich Text Format before being
               emailed as attachments.
           
 
    
     Citation Style: Submissions should be formatted in MLA style.
     Manuscript Submission Deadline: October 15, 2010
     Email inquiries to Barbara Gleason at bgleason@ccny.cuny.edu.
     Submit manuscripts to bwespecialissue@gmail.com.
 
 


BWe Special Issue: Multimodal Composing *Deadline Extended*.

Deadline: October 14, 2010.
Contact Information
Contact: Barbara Gleason
Email: bgleason@ccny.cuny.edu
Mailing Address:

 

Multimodal Composing:                                                    Council on Basic Writing
Opportunities and Challenges                              
in Basic Writing Contexts
 
BWe Guest Editor:
   Barbara Gleason, City College-CUNY
    Assistant Editors:
   Wynne Ferdinand & Lynn Reid
 
Extended Deadline for Submissions: November 15, 2010
Technical Guidelines for Submissions appended.
 
                                                                        2011 BWe Special Issue: Call for Submissions
 
For the upcoming issue of BWe, we seek essays on multimodal writing in college and pre-college composition and rhetoric classes. As Cynthia Selfe argues in the June 2009 issue of College Composition and Communication, our profession's continuing tendency to focus primarily on print literacy limits our understanding of rhetoric, discourages students from "identify[ing] their own communication needs" and needlessly limits individuals who have developed expressive identities in a digital age ("The Movement of Air, The Breath of Meaning: Aurality and Multimodal Composing" in CCC, June 2009, 618). By widening the possibilities for composing in their classrooms, instructors may establish more compelling and inclusive learning environments for students of diverse races and cultures, language backgrounds, ages, and communication interests. Teachers also may create classes that can better serve the needs of students learning differences, e.g., in the areas of vision, hearing, or attention.
 
Along with the potential advantages of incorporating multiple modes of composing into their curricula, instructors may well experience challenges that can obstruct curricular change or dampen enthusiasm of both instructors and students. Integrating new technologies into classes sometimes creates unwanted hurdles. Access to technology and digital literacies can sometimes encumber students. Instructors may experience new technologies as more burdensome than beneficial, especially when faculty are not rewarded for integrating new communication technologies into their curricula. In addition, educational institutions are increasingly demanding that digital texts and multimodal composing options be integrated into their curricula--sometimes before they have acquired the funds or the staff to support these efforts. We already know that we are experiencing a major transformation in communications that is permeating both our daily lives and our institutional realities. Most of us are struggling to develop our own expertise in multimodal composing while simultaneously teaching others to compose in digital environments.
 
We encourage prospective authors to consider both opportunities and challenges associated with teaching/learning multimodal composing. We hope to receive submissions that focus on one (or more than one) of these roles/ perspectives: writer, student, teacher, tutor, program administrator. We also welcome reviews of books & web sites that enhance instructors' knowledge of teaching with new technologies OR that facilitate adult learners' expertise in multimodal composing. Finally, since basic writing instruction is moving into new venues (e.g., as test-preparation courses in for-profit companies or in adult education programs), we welcome submissions that explore uses of multimodal composing in a variety of institutional environments.
 
 
 
 
Technical Guidelines for Submissions:
 
1. All submissions must be sent electronically to bwespecialissue@gmail.com
 
2. Use MLA style.
 
3. Acceptable submission formats include: MS Word or other word processing formats, web texts, and texts that include embedded multimedia elements. Images may be in .jpg, .gif, or .png format. Videos must be submitted as files, not as links to external sites.
 
4. Links to external sites may appear as in-text references or in a works cited list only. Web-based examples used to illustrate key ideas or arguments should be included in the text as embedded images, screen captures, video files, etc. Multimedia content hosted at an external site should be submitted as a file that can be hosted on the BWe server.
 
5. Submissions should be original work. Submissions containing work published or created by other authors must include their consent and/or follow fair use guidelines.
 
7. Submissions should be accessible in current versions of different browsers (e.g., Safari, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Google Chrome).
 
8. To ensure accessibility, a script or summary must accompany all multimedia submissions and/or video and audio content embedded in a manuscript.
 
 
Manuscript Submission Deadline: November 15, 2010
Email inquiries to Barbara Gleason at bgleason@ccny.cuny.edu.
Submit manuscripts to bwespecialissue@gmail.com


Crossing the Great Divide: Critical Thinking and Writing in the Majors.

URL: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/wacconference.xml
Deadline: April 30, 2010.
Contact Information
Contact: Robert Smart
Email: robert.smart@quinnipiac.edu
Phone: 203-582-3325
Mailing Address:

 Robert Smart, English Department Chair, Quinnipiac University, 275 Mount Carmel Avenue, Hamden, Connecticut  06518

 We invite submissions for inclusion in the conference program for Quinnipiac University’s third International Critical Thinking/Writing-Across-the-Curriculum conference which will be held on the Quinnipiac campus on Friday November 19th and Saturday November 20th, 2010.

For this third conference, our theme is framed around the linkages between critical thinking, usually associated with general education, and thinking within the majors – the disciplinary thinking students must master before they graduate.  We are calling this move from general education to major study “crossing the great divide” because students often find that what they are asked to master in their major  differs in focus and complexity from the critical thinking pedagogies that most general education curricula require of undergraduates.  Our conference will address a number of important questions:

1.       Is critical thinking broadly defined the same as disciplinary thinking? Not the same?

2.       How is WAC implicated in critical thinking pedagogy? Critical thinking implicated in WAC pedagogy?

3.       Do majors with heavy content requirements by necessity have to require less critical thinking of their students?

4.       Are there specific writing strategies and techniques that foster critical and disciplinary thinking?

5.       What constitutes “mastery” or “proficiency” within a major?

6.       Can WAC thrive in majors where there is a good deal of “teaching to forms?”

7.       What is the best preparation for students to master disciplinary thinking?

8.       Can we even teach critical thinking skills to undergraduates?

9.       How can WAC enrich and be enriched by a critical thinking pedagogy?

Papers and talks on these and other related issues are welcome for submission to the selection committee. We invite 350 word proposal abstracts to be submitted by April 30, 2010.  We welcome both individual proposals and panel proposals. Individual papers/presentations will be held to 15 minutes in length, panels will be held to 50 minutes total, with time left at the end of every session for questions. Proposals can be submitted at: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/wacconference.xml Registration cost for the conference is $300 and includes meals, materials, etc.

The keynote speaker for the Saturday luncheon is Sally Mitchell, coordinator of the Thinking Writing Program at Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL).  Since 2001, Thinking Writing has forged academic partnerships with faculty in various disciplines on campus, and more recently with secondary schools in the London metropolitan area to facilitate the design of materials and activities for writing instruction, to participate in course and curricular review and to develop new approaches for evaluating and assessing written work.  Prior to working at QMUL, Sally conducted research related to the role and nature of argument in secondary and higher education.  She is the co-editor of a book entitled Learning to Argue in Higher Education (2000).  Most recently, she has been involved in research that is designed to unpack disciplinary instantiations of argument and critical thinking, working in the discipline of Politics at QMUL.  Drawing on data from this project, her talk will consider the usefulness of highly general terms such as “argument” and “critical thinking” for students attempting to enter disciplinary conversations.


Academic Writing and Beyond in Multicultural Societies.

URL: http://web.mac.com/michael_dickel/iWeb/IFAWConf.html
Deadline: January 15, 2010.
Contact Information
Contact: Trudy Zukermann
Email: trudy@vms.huji.ac.il

 

 

IFAW

(Israel Forum for Academic Writing)

(Institute of Research, Curriculum and Program Development for Teacher Education)

Announce

First Call for Abstracts

 

“ACADEMIC WRITING AND BEYOND
IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETIES”

Israel’s First International Conference on Academic Writing
July 28-29, 2010

 

 

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations? | Contact? | Abstracts? | Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


Keynote Presenters

Deborah HoldsteinDeborah H. Holdstein, PhD
Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Columbia College Chicago
Editor, College Composition and Communication

Dr. Holdstein has published widely in such areas as film, literary studies, and rhetoric and composition; until December, 2009, she continues her term as Editor of the premier journal in rhetoric and composition, College Composition and Communication. As Editor, she is also an Officer of the international organization, the Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Before her arrival at Columbia, Holdstein served as a member of the graduate faculty at Northern Illinois University, where she was Chair of the PhD-granting Department of English. For twenty years, Holdstein taught and advised graduate and undergraduate students at Governors State University, where she also led the program in English, chaired the Graduate Council, and served as Faculty Associate for Graduate Studies and Research in the Office of the Provost. From 1997-2000, she also led GSU's university-wide North Central Association re-accreditation effort.

Dr. Holdstein's books include On Composition and Computers; Rhetorical Choices (with Charles Schuster and Keith Gilyard); The Prentice-Hall Anthology of Women Writers; and her most recent volume, Judaic Perspectives in Rhetoric and Composition (edited with Andrea Greenbaum). Deborah Holdstein also serves as a consultant to colleges and universities (and directs the Consultant-Evaluator Program of the Council of Writing Program Administrators), and is a regular speaker at major scholarly conferences.

 

 

Chris AnsonChristopher M. Anson, Ph.D.
University Distinguished Professor of English; Director, Campus Writing and Speaking Program; North Carolina State University

An avid writer, Chris has published 15 books and over 90 journal articles and book chapters and is on the editorial or reader's boards of ten journals, including CCC, CE, RTE, Across the Disciplines, Written Communication, Assessing Writing, and The Journal of Writing Assessment. He has recently co-authored a new book on digital literacies, Teaching Writing Using Blogs, Wikis, and other Digital Tools (Christopher-Gordon Publishers, 2009).

Chris has given over 425 conference papers, keynote addresses, and invited lectures and faculty workshops across the U.S. and in 21 foreign countries.

Chris served as President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators from 2002-2005 and spent seven additional years on the WPA Executive Board. He has also served on the CCCC Executive Committee (1993-96), the CCCC Outstanding Book Award Committee (2008-9), the CCCC Resolutions Committee (2002 and 2005), the CCC Editor Search Committee (2003-4), the CCCC Committee on Professional Standards (1990-93, co-chair 1993), the CCCC Committee on Issues in the Profession (2004-present), the CCCC Nominating Committee (1988 and again as chair in 1999), the CCCC Exemplar Award Committee (1996), the NCTE/CEE Nominating Committee (1987), the NCTE Committee on Language Across the Curriculum (1988-91), and the NCTE Board of Directors (1985-99). He chaired the NCTE Assembly for Research in 1992-3 and was program co-chair of the NCTE Global Conference on Language and Literacy (2000, Utrecht, Netherlands) and the Sixth Conference of the National Testing Network in Writing (1987). He chaired the WPA Task Force on Plagiarism and the WPA Task Force on Internationalization. He formed and chaired the MMLA's WAC Section (1989-1994).

 

Otto KruseOtto Kruse, Ph.D.
Director of ZHAW Center for Professional Writing at Zurich University of Applied Sciences, School of Applied Linguistics; Board Member of European Association of Teachers of Academic Writing

More detailed information to come.

 

 


The conference will address current issues in first, second, and foreign language academic writing in English, Hebrew, Arabic, and other languages. Parallel sessions will include individual presentations, panels, round table discussions, and workshops for those in higher education and those who prepare students for higher education.

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations?
Contact? | Abstracts? | Important Dates? Organizers? | Top


Tel Aviv

Who should submit abstracts?

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference?
Types of presentations? | Contact? Abstracts? Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


 

What are some suggested themes for presentations?

  • Writing within and across disciplines
  • Writing and technology
  • Academic writing in different cultures
  • History of writing pedagogy
  • Feedback and assessment of writing
  • Reflective writing
  • Writing in the workplace
  • Bridging the gap between writing in secondary school and at tertiary level
  • Academic writing and creativity
  • Dealing with plagiarism
  • Development of writing centers
  • Gaining administrative support for writing programs
  • Supporting doctoral students and post-graduate writers
  • Issues in translation and translation instruction
  • Writing as engaged citizenship
  • Writing in a second/foreign language

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations? | Contact? | Abstracts? | Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


 

What is the venue?

The new facilities of MOFET
(Institute of Research, Curriculum, and Program Development for Teacher Education)
15 Shoshana Persett Street, Tel-Aviv

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations? | Contact? | Abstracts? | Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


 

Rationale

Tel Aviv BuildingsAt the end of the first decade of the 21st century, more and more educators have come to realize the importance of academic writing programs both in and beyond academia. The view that those entering higher education are able to cope with their writing tasks without guidance has been widely challenged. The need for quality writing ability after leaving higher education is clear. Beyond the academy, with globalization in today’s worlds of business, research, and culture, writing skills are a necessity for all who wish to advance professionally. Especially in multicultural societies where students come from many different cultural and linguistic traditions and are often expected to write in more than one language, supporting student writers at all levels of study and preparing them for writing after their studies are pedagogical imperatives.

Two years ago, the Israel Forum for Academic Writing held its first meeting at Tel Aviv University. Its purpose was to connect people engaged in the teaching and research of academic writing in Israel. Instructors in academic writing in Hebrew and English from colleges and universities throughout the country attended this meeting. Since then, our organization has grown – we now have over 150 members on our mailing list. Visitors from abroad as well as local members have addressed issues such as responding to and assessing student writing, the use of technology in the teaching of writing, and how to gain administrative support for our programs. We have been fortunate in finding a home and support for our organization through the MOFET Institute.

In keeping with the intercultural and multi-linguistic nature of today’s societies, invited speakers at the first international conference on academic writing in Israel will address current issues in first language, second (third, fourth, etc.) language and foreign language writing. We are also planning to present a panel of writers in English, Hebrew, Arabic, and perhaps other languages on the topic, “Universals and Specifics of Academic Writing across Languages”. Participants will address the question of what it means to write in their various languages. Parallel sessions will include individual presentations, round table discussions, and workshops.

The program is designed to engage all those interested in academic writing programs and the writers they educate. Keynote and plenary sessions will be delivered in English. Papers and small group presentations may be given in Hebrew, English, or Arabic. Research-based contributions, as well as practical approaches to the teaching and learning of academic and professional writing are welcome.

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations? | Contact? | Abstracts? | Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


 

 

Types of Presentations

 

 

Who? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations? | Contact? | Abstracts? | Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


 

 

Where can I get further information?

From the conference chair, Dr. Trudy Zuckermann

 

Further information about the conference (e.g., registration, accommodation) will be available on our permanent website, which is currently being developed.

 

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations? | Contact? | Abstracts? | Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


 

Abstracts

Abstracts for all proposals should consist of a maximum of 300 words, and should be written in English. Abstracts written in another language should include a translation into English. All abstracts should include:

  • Title
  • Language of presentation
  • Type of presentation and participant interaction (e.g., workshop, paper, demonstration of classroom practice/method or technological program)
  • The issues/approaches/skills to be explored

Completed Abstracts

Email completed abstracts as word documents, Times New Roman, 12-point font, double-spaced

To: Miri Yochanna, myochanna@yahoo.ca
Subject line: IFAW Abstract
Include in the body of your email:
  • title of presentation
  • name of presenter(s)
  • institutional affiliation(s)
  • contact information, and
  • country

Do not include presenter information in the word document.

Selection of Abstracts for Presentation

Abstracts will be evaluated blindly, based on the following criteria:

  • Is the topic relevant to the conference theme?
  • Is the approach to the topic original?
  • Are the issues presented appropriate for the conference participants?
  • Is the presentation placed within a theoretical framework?
  • Is the issue that prompted this presentation clearly stated?
  • Are the implications for pedagogy or research clearly stated?

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations? | Contact? | Abstracts? | Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


Important Dates

Deadline for submission of abstractsJanuary 15,

2010
Notification of accepted abstracts — March 1, 2010
Conference — July 28-29, 2010

Old Yaffo

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations?
Contact? Abstracts? | Important Dates? | Organizers? | Top


 

 

 

 

 

Tel Aviv Art MuseumOrganizing Committee

Trudy Zuckermann — Achva Academic College of Education; Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Bella Rubin — Tel Aviv University
Hadara Perpignan — Bar Ilan University
Sue Schneider — David Yellin College of Education; Open University of Israel
Michael Dickel — Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Ohalo College
Miri Yochanna — Seminar Hakibbutzim College of Education; CET (the Center for Educational
Technology)
Bev Stock — David Yellin College of Education
Ziona Snir — Tel Aviv University; Seminar Hakibbutzim College of Education
Cherryl Smith — California State University, Sacramento

 

Who? | Keynote Speakers? | Some suggested themes? | Where? | Rationale of conference? | Types of presentations?
Contact? | Abstracts? Important Dates? | Organizers? Top


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CFP: Xchanges online journal Undergraduate issue, TechWriting/Rhet/Writing/WAC .

URL: http://www.nmt.edu/~xchanges
Deadline: September 30, 2009.
Contact Information
Contact: Julianne Newmark
Email: jnewmark@nmt.edu
Phone: 505-835-5901
Mailing Address:

Dr. Julianne Newmark

Xchanges journal, Editor 

Humanities Department; New Mexico Tech

801 Leroy Place

Socorro, NM 87801

 Call for Papers:

The Xchanges online journal is a refereed interdisciplinary Technical Communication and Rhetoric/Writing journal published by New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (New Mexico Tech).  Xchanges is seeking submissions of major research projects or Senior theses completed by TC, TW, or Composition/Rhetoric students during the 2007-2008 or 2008-2009 academic years.  For our inaugural issue from our new home at New Mexico Tech, we are seeking undergraduate theses/research projects in both traditional print and hypertextual or multimedia formats.  Theses or research projects must present innovative, original research of interest to technical communicators or Rhetoric/Writing professionals and students in a range of professional or academic settings. The focus of the journal Xchanges is broad and inclusive, thus the journal editors are not stipulating research-topic parameters for this issue. 

 

The journal’s address is www.nmt.edu/~xchanges.

 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Submissions can be of various lengths, as some submissions will be in journal-article format and others will be web-based (often called “webtexts”).  The form of an author’s text should be at once comprehensible, innovative, and appropriate to the information the author is presenting.  Text-based (or “traditional”) submissions should be sent as Word attachments and should conform to MLA style.  Authors of webtexts should check for cross-browser compatibility and should make all efforts to ensure that links are functional and that markup is clean. Email all submissions to jnewmark@nmt.edu.

 

PRODUCTION SCHEDULE

The schedule for the inaugural issue is as follows:

September 30, 2009 – Manuscript/Webtext submissions due

October 21, 2009 – Editorial decisions announced

December 2, 2009 -- Publication date of issue

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Submissions to or questions regarding this issue should be sent to jnewmark@nmt.edu.

 

Submissions to Xchanges are evaluated by the journal editor and the Editorial board.  Texts published in Xchanges are indexed in MLA International Bibliography.  Authors whose texts are selected will be required to submit a brief biographical statement.


New Position: Writing Across the Curriculum Survey Manager.

URL: http://www.quinnipiac.edu
Deadline: August 7, 2009.
Contact Information
Contact: Robert Smart, English Department Chair
Email: robert.smart@quinnipiac.edu
Phone: 203-582-3325
Fax: 203-582-8703
Mailing Address:

Robert Smart, English Department Chair, Quinnipiac University, 275 Mount Carmel Avenue, Hamden, CT

06518

 

JOB DESCRIPTION
 
Since 2004, the Writing Across the Curriculum program at Quinnipiac University has trained over 350 faculty in over 40 majors to use writing to learn techniques to advance the learning objectives in their classrooms. The WAC program has just been awarded additional funds from the Davis Educational Foundation to initiate a three-year project to initiate a writing in the disciplines (WID) program. The first phase of this project (2009-2010) will involve gathering data from departments across the campus to: 1) document learning goals and the extent to which writing is currently (or is not) occurring in majors; and 2) to learn more about the writing strategies that Quinnipiac faculty trained under a previous grant are finding most useful in their disciplinary work with students. The survey, and possible follow-up in focus groups, will be used as the means through which we begin to collect faculty assignment samples and student work samples and to compile a “WAC database” that will be retained for program development, research and pedagogy.
            We seek to hire a one-year Survey Manager, with possible renewal, to coordinate the first phase of this project. The Survey Manager will be responsible for developing and carrying out a survey research project to assess faculty attitudes toward writing and learning. In addition, s/he will conduct focus groups and/or qualitative interviews with selected faculty to validate and elaborate on the survey findings.  The Manager will develop appropriate data collection methodologies and protocols, oversee the implementation of the survey, and will be responsible for distributing the survey findings across the University community.
 
We will begin reviewing materials from qualified candidates on August 7th, 2009, with an aim to recommend a final hire by the end of August at the latest. Send application materials (cv/resume, three letters of reference and a 1-2 page narrative that describes work experience/training that would be relevant to the position as described) to Robert Smart, English Department Chair, Quinnipiac University, 275 Mount Carmel Avenue, Hamden, CT 06518, Robert.smart@quinnipiac.edu. Salary and benefits are competitive.
1.      Develops survey questions, in consultation with WAC Committee
2.      Pilot tests survey questions and reformats, based on feedback
3.      Implements a campus-wide survey, including follow-up with non-respondents
4.      Assists in monitoring quality assurance by re-contacting respondents to validate data collected
5.      Codes written survey results and enters data into appropriate format for data analysis. Conducts data analysis in collaboration with WAC Committee. Extracts data from surveys and transcribes information into appropriate format. Performs support services involving word processing, spreadsheet, database programs.
6.      Presentation of survey and interview results to faculty groups on campus to assess validity of findings
7.      Qualitative follow-up with faculty in interviews and/or focus groups to validate findings
8.      Integrate findings, writing samples and other materials provided by faculty to start a WAC database that will be used for further research and program development
QUALIFICATIONS
The ideal candidate will demonstrate previous success with managing research projects and interacting with clients in the nonprofit or government sectors, or will have experience conducting similar research in a post secondary context. Experience with writing (WAC) research in a University setting is a plus. An advanced degree in survey methodology, marketing research, composition/writing or in the social sciences or related field required. Knowledge of WAC programming a plus.
 
.              Strong analytical, organizational, communications and interpersonal skills.
.              Excellent writing skills including writing and editing of instruments, protocols, reports and presentations targeting wide ranges of audiences. Ability to write and edit easy-to-use survey instruments and clear, succinct, well structured written reports.
.              Strong understanding of the research process including survey design, qualitative and quantitative methods, writing and editing, and strong attention to detail and coordination skills.
.              Moderation/ interviewing skills.
.              Strong skills in Microsoft office including Word, Excel and PowerPoint. SPSS and experience working with survey software required.

.              Excellent interpersonal skills, team leadership and communications skills.


Faculty Development Position at Widener University.

URL: http://www.widener.edu
Deadline: February 1, 2009.
Contact Information
Contact: Janine Utell, Assistant Prof. of English and Co-Chair, Search Committee
Email: jmutell@mail.widener.edu
Phone: 610-499-4527
Mailing Address:

Widener University

Humanities Division

One University Place

Chester, PA 19013

 

Faculty Developer Position
 
Widener University has been nationally recognized for our innovative practices in experiential learning and active scholarship. We seek a dynamic Director for the Office of Pedagogical Support to serve as a consultant to faculty, a collaborator in pedagogical design, and a conduit for support and resources. The office is integral to a comprehensive, multidimensional model of a continuum of support for faculty as part of our mission and strategic commitments to academic excellence and civic engagement. The Director will provide consultative services for faculty innovation in curriculum design, pedagogy, and assessment; assist faculty in effective use of technology for instruction and its delivery; coordinate programs promoting scholarly activity and  recognition; and support diversity, leadership, collaboration, service learning, faculty mentoring and other strategic priorities related to exemplary teaching, learning, and assessment. The successful candidate will be expected to sustain the exciting work already being done by Widener faculty, staff, and administrators while serving as a partner in holistic and lifelong faculty development at all career stages.
 
The position is administrative with a faculty appointment; the individual filling the position will be expected to teach one to three courses a year. The Director will be situated organizationally within the Office of the Provost.
 
The desired candidate will have:
 
Qualifications: Candidates must have a doctoral degree and strong evidence of exemplary college teaching experience, as well as at least three years of faculty development experience that includes: planning and implementing faculty activities addressing innovative teaching, learning, and assessment; consultative services for faculty innovation in curriculum design and pedagogy; effective use and integration of technology; and support for diversity, leadership, cross-disciplinary collaborations, and other strategic initiatives related to teaching and learning.
 
Interested candidates may submit cover letter, curriculum vitae, references (including phone numbers and email addresses), and salary requirements to mrlehman@mail.widener.edu. Review of applications will begin in early January 2009 and will continue until the position is filled.


CFP: Race and Racism in Writing Assessment (edited collection).

Deadline: August 1, 2008.
Contact Information
Contact: Asao B. Inoue or Mya Poe
Email: ainoue@csufresno.edu
Phone: 559.278.4921
Mailing Address:

Department of English

5245 North Backer Ave. M/S PB98

California State University, Fresno

Fresno, CA 93740-8001

 

The editors of this collection ask for chapter proposals that consider issues of race and racism in college writing assessments. For instance, can our current theories and practices of writing assessment serve the changing face of higher education? Are the methods that we currently use really the best ones to assess the literacies of our diverse students? What about new technologies of assessment such as machine scoring and directed self-placement (DSP)? And what about the expectations that students bring to tests, the uses (and abuses) of test scores, and the machinery of testing systems that “inevitably” track students along certain educational paths?

The editors invite you to consider proposing an essay, scholarly piece, classroom study, or research article. Chapters may consider all aspects of writing assessment, including histories of assessment practices, test design, administrative policies, program applications of test outcomes, machine scoring, validation studies, discursive or genre functions of assessment, or other closely related work. Our goal is to begin new dialogues about writing assessment, ones that go beyond simplistic explanations about racial achievement gaps, ethnic literacies, or cultures of deficit.

All submissions should discuss or inquire specifically about racial formations (race/ethnicity), racism in writing assessments, or commiserate issues such as the intersections of socio-economic status, gender, and race. We are most interested in newer empirical studies that inquire into race/ethnicity and racism in writing programs, or scholarly essays that discuss writing assessment theory alongside frameworks that highlight racial formations, such as critical race theory, whiteness studies, multiculturalism, racial identity development, anti-racist pedagogy, post-colonial theory, or comparative rhetorics. We also want to encourage international or cross-national studies that complicate our discussions of racial/ethnic identity and literacy testing.

The primary audience for this collection will be U.S. Writing Studies scholars, educational assessment researchers, writing teachers and writing program administrators. Additionally we are encouraging international submissions.

Currently, contributors for this collection who have already agreed to offer either chapters or responses to sections of chapters are: Chris Anson, Wayne Au, Valerie Balester, Elisabeth Bautier, Adam Banks, Bill Condon, Tom Fox, Keith Gilyard, Anne Herrington, Malea Powell, Victor Villanueva, and Morris Young.

Background and Context

According to statistics from the 2005 U.S. Census Bureau, 45% of children under the age of 5 are of color. In fact, the National Center for Educational Statistics’ 35th edition of Projections of Educational Statistics to 2016 (2007) reports that by 2016 enrollment in degree-granting institutions will increase in the following ways:

Not only will U.S. college students increasingly be of color, but internationally, many other countries are experiencing major changes in cultural diversity with influxes of immigrants from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Such demographic changes have and will continue to have a major impact on educational systems. The changing demographics of educational systems also raise important questions about current educational practices, in particular the assessment of writing. For example, given the U.S. history of racial inequality and our understanding of the way that assessment has historically reasserted those inequalities, how do the new demographics of U.S. universities affect, or should affect, the ways that we assess students’ literacies? How does diversity, as a global set of racial formations, in schools complicate and require new ways to see socio-economic status, language proficiency and attainment, and education policy? How can the scholarship and research on racialized rhetorics, racial histories, and language diversity in the classroom offer productive, new ways to theorize, practice, understand, and validate writing assessments in higher education? This collection, we hope, will address these important writing assessment needs and composition studies issues.

Collection’s Organization and Guiding Themes

The collection will be organized around the following sections, which we offer as a guide for submissions:

Rac(ism) in Assessment Histories

Rac(ism) in Assessment Theory

Rac(ism) in Classroom Assessment Practices

Rac(ism) in Writing Program Administrations

Rac(ism) in Community, Literacy, and Immigration

Editors and Timeline

The editors of this collection are Asao B. Inoue (California State University, Fresno) and Mya Poe (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). All inquires may be emailed to either editor at ainoue@csufresno.edu or myapoe@MIT.EDU.

Proposal Details and Contact Info

All proposals are due by August 1, 2008 to Asao B. Inoue (ainoue@csufresno.edu) by email attachment. All accepted proposed chapters will be determined by Aug 30, 2008, and writers will be notified shortly thereafter. All review drafts for chapters will be due by Jan 01, 2009 emailed to Asao B. Inoue (ainoue@csufresno.edu). All submissions will undergo a double-blind review before acceptance.

All proposals should be 2-4 pages (around 600-1,200 words) and provide the following information: a proposed title for your chapter, an abstract, and the author’s contact information, title, and institutional affiliation. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified and sent chapter style guidelines. Full chapters will be in APA style.


CFP:Caribbean Journal of Education (CJE) Special Edition .

Deadline: June 15, 2008.
Contact Information
Contact: Paulette Ramsay
Email: wac.uwimona@gmail.com

 

Call for Papers
 
Caribbean Journal of Education (CJE) Special Edition    
Integrating Discourse Communities in the Academy: Writing Across the Curriculum
 
Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) isa pedagogical approach that gives emphasis to the centrality of writing to all academic disciplines. Two basic positions sustain WAC programs: (1) writing helps students to learn disciplinary content, and (2) writing is integrally linked to the field in which one writes. Therefore, writing should be a component in all college classes, rather than limited to writing/ composition courses in English departments. In keeping with this position, The English Language Section, Dept. of Language, Linguistics and Philosophy, University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona initiated a WAC programme in November 2006.
 
As WAC at UWI moves forward, this special issue of the Caribbean Journal of Education (CJE) seeks to bring discussions about WAC to the forefront of the debate on curriculum reform. We invite papers which investigate ways in which various disciplines are linked to writing, as well as how WAC strategies may be integrated into other academic disciplines. Other specific areas of research may include the following:
 
  1. Development and implementation of WAC at UWI
  2. Integration of WAC strategies into courses at UWI in the Faculty of Humanities and Education (FHE), Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences (FPAS) and Faculty of Social Sciences (FSS)
  3. Issues related to the implementation of WAC at UWI
  4. Approaches to and models for the implementation of WAC at all UWI campuses
  5. Curriculum reform and WAC
  6. The role of administrators in the implementation and sustainability of WAC in the academy.
 
Other papers which address the concerns and challenges facing WAC implementers and advocates elsewhere are also welcome.
 
The CJE is a refereed journal. All articles submitted for publication for this edition must be related to WAC pedagogy. The authors of articles submitted for consideration are responsible for crediting their sources and are required to follow the format of the Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition). Articles should not exceed thirty (30) pages, double-spaced, inclusive of tables, figures and reference page(s). Further, they should not have been published nor submitted for publication elsewhere. An accompanying abstract of approximately 150 words, single spaced, which provides a concise overview of the essay, is required at the beginning of the paper.
 
All articles should be sent electronically to the email address listed below. For each article submitted, the author’s name and address should appear on a separate (cover) page to ensure anonymity in the peer review process. The editors will receive the articles for publication by July 15th 2008. They can also be contacted for further information regarding this special publication or related issues. The Guest Editor for this special issue of the Journal is Dr Paulette Ramsay who is an interdisciplinary academic at The University of the West Indies, Mona. She participated in the Writing Across the Curriculum Programme at Berry College and the University of Iowa International Writing Workshop. She has published articles, review essays , interviews and translations in academic journals such as The Langston Hughes ReviewAfro- Hispanic Review, Bulletin of Latin American Review, College Language Association Journal, Caribbean Quarterly among others.Dr. Ramsay has recently been selected as one of the “UWI Sixty Under Sixty” awardees, recognized by the Vice Chancellor for excellence in research and teaching.
 Please send articles or questions to:  wac.uwimona@gmail.com
 


call for book chapters: research on assessment.

Deadline: March 1, 2008.
Contact Information
Contact: C. S. Schreiner, Chair, M.A. Program in English, University of Guam
Email: csscamel@yahoo.com
Phone: 671-735-2738
Fax: 671-734-2731

CALL FOR CHAPTERS

Proposal Deadline: November 1, 2007

Chapter Deadline: March 1, 2008

HANDBOOK OF RESEARCH ON

ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES, METHODS, AND APPLICATIONS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Editor: Dr. Christopher Schreiner, University of Guam, Guam U.S.A.

 

Introduction

Articles and essays on learning assessment across the disciplines (Liberal Arts, Social Sciences; Science, Math, Engineering, and Technology) are welcome. The research emphasis of this new volume in the Handbooks of Research series published by IGI Global accommodates in-depth studies that elucidate both the prospects and problems of learning assessment in higher education. Contributors are invited to share their research on both commonly used and new, highly innovative instruments and concepts.

 

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

I. Assessment Technologies and Instruments

PTA (Primary Trait Analysis); ACT; CLEP; Compass; Compass/ESL;GMAT;MAT; NBPTS Tests; Nelson-Denny; PRAXIS; SAT; TOEFL; GRE; LSAT; PCAT;WLOE; ETS’ MAPP (Measurement of Academic Proficiency); Web-based SALG (Student Assessment of Learning Gains); and CAT (Classroom Assessment Techniques); Accuplacer; Digital/Information Literacy Assessment Tools.

II. Assessment Cases and Initiatives

Capstone Assessment; Assessing Critical Thinking; Honors Education; General Education; Ethical Behavior; Learning Styles, Attitudes, Beliefs; Developmental Learning; The Composition Class; The Laboratory; Literature Class; Oral Communication Assessment; Performance Assessment; CBT (computer-based testing); Logical Reasoning Assessment; Literacy Assessment; Assessing Originality and Creativity; E-Portfolios; Distance Education; Alternative Assessment; Program Review.

III. Assessing Assessment

The Difference that Assessment Makes; The Limits of Assessment; Historical Studies of Assessment in Higher Education; The Discourses of Assessment; What is Worthy of Assessment?; Roundtable on Assessment: Administrative, Faculty, and Student Interpretations of Assessment; Review-Essay of Recent Books and Articles on Assessment; Quantitative versus Qualitative Methods; Critique and Assessment.

 

Submission Procedure

Researchers, professors, and administrators are invited to submit by November 1, 2007 or earlier, a 2-4 page proposal explaining the mission and concerns of the proposed chapter. Microsoft WORD is preferred. Your proposal should contain 1) proposed title of your chapter, 2) abstract of the paper, 3) relevance to the book, and 4) your brief professional profile and contact details (including mailing and e-mail addresses). Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by December 1, 2007 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter organizational guidelines. Full chapters in APA style are expected to be submitted by March 1, 2008. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a blind review basis. The book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), (http://www.igi-global.com/) in early 2009.

 

Inquiries and Submissions can be forwarded electronically (Word document) or by mail to:

 

Dr. Christopher Schreiner

College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences

UNIVERSITY OF GUAM

Mangilao, Guam 96923 USA

Tel.: 671-735-2738 • Fax: 671-734-2731

E-mail: csscamel@yahoo.com

 


Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in WAC .

URL: http://www.lasalle@edu
Deadline: February 28, 2007.
Contact Information
Contact: Margot Soven
Email: soven@lasalle.edu
Phone: 610-664-0491
Fax: 610-664-0491

Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy .

Deadline: January 1, 2007.
Contact Information
Contact: James Inman and Doug Eyman
Email: kairosed@technorhetoric.net

Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy is an online, peer-reviewed journal that has been active since 1996 and publishes two issues a year. We accept submissions all year as well as issuing special calls for webtexts, and are interested primarily in articles dealing with the intersections (be they theoretical or practical) between technology, rhetoric, and pedagogy as they pertain to written, visual, or oral discourse.  Texts submitted for consideration should be designed as web pages, and we encourage authors to integrate new media technologies such as Flash and/or digital video. For a full description of submission guidelines, please visit http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/guides/author/index.htm.


The fall 2005 issue will be the 10th Anniversary issue!


The co-editors, James Inman and Doug Eyman, welcome your submissions or questions via e-mail at kairosed@technorhetoric.net.


Faculty position at North Dakota State U: Tech/Professional Comm and English Education--3/2 load.

URL: http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/ndsu/english
Deadline: November 10, 2006.
Contact Information
Contact: Muriel Brown
Email: muriel.brown@ndsu.edu
Phone: 701-231-7160
Mailing Address: Muriel Brown, Search Committee Chair
English Department, 320 Minard Hall
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND  58105-5075

The English Department at North Dakota State University is looking for a new colleague, someone who can help us with our technical communication program and with English education. We have a very collegial department that is deep for its size in rhetoric and composition professionals. Below is the official position description with a little information about NDSU and Fargo.



POSITION TITLE:   
Tenure Track Faculty (Open Rank)
DEPARTMENT:    English
CLOSING DATE:    Consideration of applications will begin on November 10th and continue until the position is filled.
DESCRIPTION:   
The English Faculty at North Dakota State University invites applications for a faculty position, open rank. Ideally, we seek someone who can teach technical and professional communication, advise graduate students, support our secondary English education program, and possibly assume administrative responsibilities in the English Department. The successful applicant’s duties will consist of a 3/2 teaching load (with additional course release(s) available for administrative responsibilities), conducting research that leads to publication, and serving on appropriate committees. This position has a joint appointment in the School of Education. We expect this person will teach a secondary English methods course and undergraduate and graduate classes in professional and technical communication. The appointment begins August 15, 2007, pending funding.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATION
S:    
Doctorate in English, English Education, or related field
University-level teaching experience
Effective written and oral communication skills

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:    
Background in international professional / technical communication
Secondary English teaching experience
Graduate course work in English education
Program administration experience.

TO APPLY:   
Please send letter, CV, three letters of recommendation, writing sample, one-page teaching philosophy, and one-page research agenda to:

Muriel Brown, Search Committee Chair
NDSU Department of English
320 Minard Hall
Fargo, ND 58105-5075

Please visit the department website (http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/ndsu/english> or email Muriel.Brown@ndsu.edu if you have questions about the position.

An Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action institution, NDSU encourages women, persons of color and persons with disabilities to apply.



THE UNIVERSITY
North Dakota State University is the state's Morrill Act land-grant institution. Located on the state's eastern border in Fargo, North Dakota's largest city, the university strives to be a leader in information systems, technology transfer, economic development, and lifelong learning and encompasses a broad spectrum of curricular offerings, scholarly activity and service. It is one of two major research universities in an 11-institution state university system. NDSU has enjoyed steady enrollment growth for the past decade.

The university is striving to substantially increase the number of international students currently enrolled in the university at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Current enrollment is about 12,100 students on the campus in Fargo. NDSU also serves several thousand people throughout the state in continuing education and extension programs. NDSU researchers are leading major initiatives in nanotechnology, microelectronics, polymers, food safety, materials science, and more. In a partnership with Alien Technology Inc., NDSU's new research park will be home to the world's first mass scale Radio Frequency Identification tag manufacturing facility.

Innovative teaching and learning is conducted in nine academic units: the Colleges of Agriculture, Food Systems and Natural Resources; Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; Business Administration; Engineering and Architecture; Human Development and Education; Pharmacy; Science and Mathematics; University Studies; and the Graduate School. NDSU has 39 doctoral and professional programs, 49 master's degree programs and 99 bachelor's degree programs. The North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and NDSU Extension Service are integral parts of the University.

NDSU participates in the Tri-College University consortium with neighboring Minnesota State University-Moorhead (more than 7900 students) and Concordia College (about 2900 students). NDSU has approximately 1,500 staff members and 800 faculty and academic staff.

THE COMMUNITY
Recently named one of the most desirable places in the country to live by Money magazine, Fargo is quickly earning a reputation as a perfect place to make a home. Nestled in the rich farmlands of the Red River Valley, the Fargo-Moorhead community has many qualities that contribute to this reputation, including the highly-respected educational system, advanced medical technology, a progressive business community, numerous cultural and arts opportunities, clean air and water, and good-hearted, friendly people.

With more than 166,000 people in the community and about 500,000 people in the service area, Fargo-Moorhead is among the largest metropolitan centers between Minneapolis and Seattle and was recently named an All-American City. To learn more about what national publications are saying about the community's quality of life, visit http://www.fmchamber.com/community/qualityoflife.html.


Writing as Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines Conference.

Deadline: June 15, 2006.
Contact Information
Contact: Timothy Dansdill
Email: timothy.dansdill@quinnipiac.edu
Phone: 203-582-8454
Mailing Address:

Timothy T Dansdill

Assistant Professor, English

Quinnipiac University

CLA#1

275 Mt. Carmel Avenue

Hamden, CT 06518-1949

                     Quinnipiac University's First National Conference on

                  Critical Thinking as Writing Across the Disciplines

We invite proposals from all disciplines, and especially from inter-curricular and cross-disciplinary teams, which highlight the integration of Critical Thinking Research with the best practices of teaching Writing and Rhetoric Across the Disciplines. Once the exclusive province of Philosophy, over the past two decades Critical Thinking has emerged across the curricula of many disciplines-Health Sciences, Business, Legal Studies-and is taking on the status of a "Movement" that our conference would like presenters and participants to consider in parallel with the 30 year old Writing Across the Curriculum Movement. Another, more useful analogy for imagining the actual integration of these two "critical" movements might be that of a bridge under construction. The analogy of a bridge in this case raises the question that motivates this national conference: What are the challenges in, and new pedagogical possibilities for, joining these two far reaching movements in higher education? How can faculty across the disciplines help one another build new bridges between cross-curricular writing and critical thinking?

Our key note speaker will be John Bean, professor of English at Seattle University, where he holds the title of "Consulting Professor of Writing and Assessment." The author of the widely used Engaging Ideas: The Professor's Guide to Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom, he has been active in the writing-across-the-curriculum movement since its inception in the 1970's. He will present his most recent research assessing the critical thinking skills of graduating seniors, and will draw connections between critical thinking, argumentative writing, and rhetoric across the disciplines.   

We welcome individual, panel, and roundtable session proposals that are grounded in the traditional principles and practices from Writing Across the Curriculum and Writing in the Disciplines, as well as those that employ more recent evolutions in critical reading and writing using Electronic Communication and Digital Rhetoric. We are particularly interested, however, in presentations that connect findings from the last twenty years of research on Critical Thinking with the goals of general educational reform that are now associated with the WAC movement. 

We invite colleagues to consider one of three different themes for defining proposals and organizing presentations.

Theme A--Starting Out: Writing to Learn as Critical Thinking or Vice Versa?

Theme B--Getting Across: Critical Thinking Research and Writing to Communicate

Theme C--Going Beyond: New Directions in Critical Thinking and Writing  Across the Disciplines

To ensure broad participation, proposal for individual papers are limited to 20 minutes and may be grouped into panels at the discretion of the conference committee. Panel presentations are limited to 80 minutes, including 20 minutes for discussion.

Proposals will be read and email replies as to acceptance by August 15, 2006.

All proposals should include the following information:

Individual Proposals (300-500 words) should include: Description of the paper topic and appropriate contact information.


Panel Proposals (300-500 words) should include: Description of the panel topic, panel participants, and appropriate contact information.


bbbto Timothy Dansdill, Assistant Professor of English,

                Timothy.Dansdill@quinnipiac.edu <mailto:Timothy.Dansdill@quinnipiac.edu>

Please Type: QUWAC Conference Proposal in the Subject Window.


No Proposals will be Considered After June 15.


Coordinator, Writing Across the Curriculum Program.

URL: http://www.lehigh.edu/~infdli/WAC.htm
Deadline: December 7, 2005.
Contact Information
Contact: Pamela Steigerwalt
Email: pss2@lehigh.edu
Mailing Address: Pamela Steigerwalt Library and Technology Services 8A East Packer Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18015.

Lehigh University is seeking a Writing Across the Curriculum Program Coordinator to provide leadership, faculty support, planning, resource development, and program assessment for the Writing Across the Curriculum Program.

Duties include: develop, implement, and manage a strategic plan for the WAC program; assist faculty, individually and through workshops, in the development of assignments, teaching methods, and course designs that foster improvements in student writing within disciplinary contexts; coordinate programming with other writing and faculty development programs on campus; enhance writing instruction with appropriate uses of instructional technologies and library resources; initiate and support proposals for program funding enhancements from outside organizations; and perform other related duties as assigned. May teach one course per semester, pending departmental and supervisory approval.

Qualifications: Doctoral degree in English, Rhetoric, Composition, Education or related field; knowledge of Writing Across the Curriculum research, theory, and pedagogy; experience in the development, administration, and assessment of a writing program; ability to work in a collaborative manner with faculty and staff; excellent teaching and coaching skills; experience with the use of instructional technologies for teaching and learning; strong communication and leadership skills; and successful completion of standard background checks.

This position will report to the Director of Faculty Development, will contribute to the efforts of the Lehigh Lab, and will work closely with the directors of the First-year Writing Program and the Center for Writing, Math, and Study Skills. Initial appointment is for three years, renewable upon review. Salary commensurate with experience and qualifications. Lehigh University has excellent benefits. For a full description of the position, duties, and qualifications, see http://www.lehigh.edu/~infdli/WAC.htm

Please send a letter and cv or resume by December 7th to Pamela Steigerwalt either electronically (pss2@lehigh.edu) or via US mail to Pamela Steigerwalt, Library and Technology Services, 8A East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015. AA/EEO Employer; minorities encouraged to apply.


Research Network Forum at CCCC 2006.

URL: http://www.rnfonline.com
Deadline: November 15, 2005.
Contact Information
Contact: Risa P. Gorelick
Email: rgorelic@monmouth.edu
Phone: 732-571-3623
Mailing Address: Monmouth University
Dept. of English
400 Cedar Ave.
West Long Branch, NJ 07764

Please join us in Chicago to present a Work-in-Progress presentation or serve as a Discussion Leader (for those who are seasoned, established researchers). Electronic proposal forms will be available at www.rnfonline.com after the 2005 CCCC. Deadline: To appear in the official CCCC Program as a Work-in-Progress presenter, Discussion Leader, or Editor, please reply by July 31, 2005. You may appear on the RNF Program in addition to having a speaking role at the Conference on College Composition & Communications.  Final Deadline for inclusion in the RNF Program is November 15, 2005 (note earlier deadline)!

For more information, please contact Risa P. Gorelick, RNF Chair, at rgorelic@monmouth.edu, risa1804@aol.com, or 732-571-3623.


Eighth National Writing Across the Curriculum Conference.

URL: http://www.clemson.edu/pearce/wac2006
Deadline: September 26, 2005.
Contact Information
Contact: Art Young, Kathi Yancey
Email: wac2006-L@clemson.edu
Phone: 864.656.3062, 864.656.5394
Fax: 864.656.1846
Mailing Address: Department of English, 616 Strode Tower, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0523

We solicit proposals for The Eighth National Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, May 18-20, 2006, at Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina.

We encourage proposals from all disciplines—and from cross disciplinary teams—on a wide range of topics of interest to faculty, graduate students, and administrators at two and four year colleges. These topics include: WAC: writing across the curriculum; WID: writing in the disciplines; CAC: communication across the curriculum, which includes oral, visual, digital, and written communication; and ECAC: electronic communication across the curriculum. The keynote address will be delivered by Anne Herrington and Charles Moran, both of the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Proposal Deadline: September 26, 2005. Please submit proposals in one of five session types—individual presentations; full panels; roundtable sessions; poster sessions; and pre-conference workshops—and in one of six broad themes—teaching; research; history; theory; politics; assessment; technology; program administration; and topics that cross categories.

For program proposal forms and additional conference information, please see our website at http://www.clemson.edu/pearce/wac2006 .

Please also feel free to contact the conference planners via email, wac2006-L@clemson.edu or fax, 864.656.1846. You may also contact the conference co-directors: Art Young (864.656.3062) or Kathi Yancey (864.656.5394), Department of English, 616 Strode Tower, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0523.


Director, Language Arts Student Success & Readiness Programs.

URL: http://www.fhda.edu
Deadline: April 22, 2005.
Contact Information
Contact: Employment Services
Email: employment@fhda.edu
Phone: (650) 949-6217
Mailing Address: Employment Services Foothill-De Anza Community College District 12345 El Monte Road Los Altos Hills, California 94022

ANNOUNCEMENT OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY De Anza College Director, Language Arts Student Success & Readiness Programs

Job #05-049 Review Date: 04/22/05 The Foothill-De Anza Community College District is currently accepting applications for the faculty position of Director, Language Arts Student Success & Readiness Programs, De Anza College.

The Director of Language Arts Student Success and Readiness Programs provides vision, leadership, and coordination for student success in developmental courses in Language Arts and beyond to ensure the quality and effectiveness of the college's efforts. The Director facilitates cross-departmental communication among faculty who teach and all other staff who tutor, counsel, coordinate or otherwise support developmental education and instructional support, so as to improve the college's comprehensive approach to student success.

This faculty member is responsible for the various processes necessary to provide high-quality instruction and support in a variety of programs in the Language Arts division (see below).

The College Readiness Program (CRP) is an instructional support program for students enrolled in developmental Language Arts classes. Readiness classes are 1/2 unit co-requisites for the two levels of developmental Writing, Reading, and ESL classes prior to transfer-level English (1A). The Language Arts Student Success/Writing Center is in development. Plans for this center include: offering credit, co-requisite, and non-credit individual, group, and online reading and writing assistance; workshops, and courses; as well as student counseling and advising, resources for faculty; support for writing-across-the-curriculum, and literary and cultural events.

The Listening/Speaking Lab provides a place for students to practice their listening skills, pronunciation, and conversation, and presentation skills through a variety of credit and non-credit options.

The Tutorial and Academic Skills Center offers individual, group, and online tutoring; Adjunct Study Skills small group support linked to content courses, and self-paced Skills classes.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE POSITION INCLUDE: Teach in one or more of the associated programs and courses as needed. Provide training, as needed, for teaching assistants, instructors, counselors, staff and administrators. Research recent developments in pedagogy and innovations in curricula, technology, and methodology pertaining to developmental education and instructional support, and shares findings with the college community. Design and oversee procedures for the collection, analysis, and communication of diagnostic and outcome data on students in developmental and instructional support programs in order to evaluate program effectiveness. Identifies ways to improve quality and effectiveness of support programs. In consultation with appropriate departments, coordinate the revision and development of curricula and/or new delivery systems as needed. In consultation with appropriate departments coordinate improvements in placement, diagnostic, and exit assessments as needed. Monitor the allocations and expenses for the various instructional support programs. Assist with the hiring, training, evaluation and monthly payroll process of teaching assistants. Coordinate the quarterly campus scheduling process for classes and services in associated programs, in consultation with faculty coordinators and departments. Participate in grant development as needed to enable the college to increase its services to developmental learners. Assist with the hiring, training and scheduling of instructional staff for summer session classes in associated programs. Participate in Language Arts Division Council, departmental meetings, and other efforts that affect the programs, instruction and support for students in developmental courses. Participate in District, campus, division, and department projects as appropriate. Standard duties expected of all faculty include development and evaluation of curricula, maintaining scheduled office hours, attendance at department and division meetings, pursuing professional growth activities, and performing other duties consistent with the role of an instructor. Instructors also have the opportunity to serve on district and college committees and participate in campus extra-curricular activities.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Understanding of, sensitivity to, and respect for the diverse academic, socio-economic, ethnic, cultural, disability, religious background and sexual orientation of community college students, faculty and staff. 2. Applicants must meet the State minimum qualifications in ONE of the following Disciplines:

English ESL Reading

Minimum qualifications for faculty and administrators for the California Community Colleges can be viewed at http://www.cccco.edu/divisions/hr/f_sdev/min_qual.htm

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: 1. Experience developing, coordinating and directing developmental and/or instructional support programs at the secondary, community college or college/university level. 2. At least four years experience teaching ESL, reading, composition or similar developmental courses to adult learners in a multicultural academic setting and incorporating diverse cultural, linguistic, international, gender, and ethnic perspectives in courses. 3. Experience designing and implementing curricula, including curricula for a variety of learning styles via different delivery systems. 4. Two years experience managing budgets in an instructional setting. 5. Experience hiring, training, supervising and evaluating faculty, staff, paraprofessionals, instructional assistants, teaching assistants, or tutors. 6. Familiarity with recent theory in developmental education methodology and assessment techniques, and instructional support programs. 7. Familiarity with current psycholinguistic and learning theory on language acquisition and language processing, including learning differences and disabilities. 8. Experience with collaborative or interdisciplinary teaching and computer-assisted and online or distance instruction.

APPLICATION PACKET: 1. A District application to be completed at www.fhdajobs.net (a paper application is available by visiting www.fhda.edu or by contacting Employment Services). 2. A cover letter detailing your qualifications, skills and abilities as they relate to the position. 3. A current resume of all work experience, formal education and training. Your cover letter must address the qualifications. 4. In a separate document provide information which demonstrates your understanding of, sensitivity to, and respect for the diverse academic, socio-economic, ethnic, cultural, disability, religious background and sexual orientation of community college students, faculty and staff. 5. Photocopies of all college transcripts. 6. In a single document, respond to the three questions below. Do not exceed 300 words for each question. a. Describe your experience developing, coordinating, or directing developmental and/or instructional support programs (i.e. writing or tutorial centers). Explain some of the challenges of this experience. b. Explain a particular pedagogical approach you have used in teaching developmental students. c. Describe a time you collaborated with colleagues to change or initiate a policy or program. What role did you play in the collaboration?

Incomplete application packets will not be forwarded to the search committee for review.

Application materials become the property of the District and will not be returned.

SALARY RANGE: $52,813-$82,163 annually plus benefits; actual placement is non-negotiable and is based on applicant’s verified education and experience.

Excellent benefits package which includes full cost medical coverage for employee and eligible dependents, dental, vision care, employee assistance program, long term disability, retirement benefits and basic life insurance. Faculty are also eligible for paid sabbatical leaves and stipends for educational and professional development.

TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT: Full-time, Permanent, 11 months per year.

STARTING DATE: August 2005

Persons with disabilities who require reasonable accommodation to complete the employment process must notify Employment Services no later than the closing date of the announcement.

The successful applicant will be required to provide proof of authorization to work in the U.S.

The Foothill-De Anza Community College District does not reimburse applicants for travel, lodging or any other costs incurred by applicant to attend interviews. All interviewing costs incurred will be the responsibility of the applicant.

For information on our benefits package that includes fully paid medical for employees and dependents, visit our web site: http://hr.fhda.edu/benefits

For more information about our application process contact: Employment Services Foothill-De Anza Community College District 12345 El Monte Road Los Altos Hills, California 94022 (650) 949-6217 Email: employment@fhda.edu http://www.fhda.edu


Computers and Composition: Special Issue in Second Language Writing and Technology.

Deadline: March 1, 2004.
Contact Information
Contact: Kevin Eric De Pew
Email: pepepew@purdue.edu

I invite proposals for a special issue of Computers and Composition, entitled “Second Language Writing and Technology,” which will explore the theoretical and pedagogical implications of writing technologies for second language writers.

 

The guest editor encourages submissions that explore a wide range of topics from a variety of perspectives.  The articles should be guided by, but are not limited to, the following questions:

 

·   What are the technological writing practices of SLWs and how do these practices correspond to what we already know from SLW theory or computers and writing theory?  In particular, how does the technology affect the writing practices of various SLW populations (American students learning a second language, international undergraduate students, international graduate students, immigrant students/writers, generation 1.5 students/writers, pre-college students/writers, technical and business writers)?

·   What curricular designs that incorporate technology have been conducive to the literacy development of SLWs?  In particular, what writing and researching technologies are most conducive and why?

·   How do writing technologies affect the classroom dynamic in a class populated with all SLWs? In a class with one or two SLWs?

·   How does the design of various writing technologies position the writer?  Is this position conducive for SLWs’ needs?

·   In what ways, if any, does the technology facilitate the cultural negotiation writers may experience when composing in a second language?

·   How does the nature of the second language writing populations influence our research on computers and writing?

·   How might recent scholarship about subjectivity and technology inform our understanding of SLWs and technology? In particular how can scholarship on race and technology, gender and technology, and sexuality and technology inform our research of and technological practices with SLWs and technology?

·   What is the relationship between women and technology outside of the US?  In specific contexts, how does this relationship affect their technological literacy practices?

·   What role should writing technologies play in oral English courses?

·   What are the technological literacy practices of SLWs who use various writing technologies for social purposes (e.g., social MUDs/MOOs, instant messaging, blogs, web authoring)?

 

In as much as possible, all articles should take into consideration current scholarly work in both second language writing studies and the teaching of writing with technology.  The guest editor is more than willing to assist interested scholars in locating appropriate sources.

 

The audience for Computers and Composition is teachers, scholars, educational administrators, and technology users with a particular interest in computer-enhanced writing instruction. Manuscripts should be 15-25 pages long, double-spaced, and be formatted according to APA style.

DEADLINES:

500-word abstract:  March 1, 2004

Draft of manuscript:  September 1, 2004


LLAD Special Issue: “The Linguistically Diverse Student: Challenges and Possibilities Across the Curriculum”.

Deadline: February 1, 2004.
Contact Information
Contact: Ann Johns
Email: ajohns@cox.net.
Mailing Address: Department of Rhetoric & Writing Studies, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4452

Language and Learning Across the Disciplines invites proposals for a special issue entitled “The Linguistically Diverse Student: Challenges and Possibilities Across the Curriculum,” to be guest edited by Ann Johns. Proposals are welcome (500-1000 words) that relate to EFL/ESL, ELL, ELD, bilingual, Generation 1.5 or a combination of linguistically diverse students in disciplinary classrooms. Proposals due: February 1, 2004. Publication: Winter 2005. Send proposals and inquiries to Ann Johns, Department of Rhetoric & Writing Studies, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4452. Electronic submission preferred: ajohns@cox.net.


Call For Proposals: Book Culture in Composition Studies.

Deadline: January 15, 2004.
Contact Information
Contact: Peter Vandenberg and Laura Micciche
Email: pvandenb@depaul.edu
Mailing Address: Department of English,
DePaul University,
McGaw Hall,
Chicago, IL 60614

Original essays examining the emergence, evolution, and consequences of book publishing in composition studies are sought for a collection titled Book Culture in Composition Studies. The editors are interested in contributions that address the rise of the book in composition scholarship from theoretical perspectives (e.g., materialist, feminist, multicultural), various locations in the academic hierarchy (e.g., graduate students, adjunct faculty, tenure-track and tenured faculty) and the publishing industry (commercial and academic presses), and in relation to composition’s institutional, departmental, and disciplinary history. Possible topics might include the following: book culture and the teaching/research binary; books as material social practice; the effect of book culture on academic journals; books and tenure requirements; local and/or disciplinary definitions of “the book”; book culture and alternative discourses; the role of edited collections in composition studies; the politics of university and commercial presses; the incredible shrinking academic book; book culture and the dissertation; the nature of book reviewing in composition studies; book culture and digital scholarship; book culture and academic power relations; and composition’s book culture as an expression of wider developments in the Humanities. Send one copy of a 1 pg., single-spaced proposal, or full-length essay, by January 15, 2004 to Peter Vandenberg, Department of English, DePaul University, McGaw Hall, Chicago, IL 60614; and to Laura Micciche, Department of English, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858. Send queries to miccichel@mail.ecu.edu or pvandenb@depaul.edu. 

 


Call for Webtexts: Kairos CoverWeb 9.1: The Rhetoric and Pedagogy of Portable Technologies.

Deadline: January 1, 2004.
Contact Information
Contact: Beth L. Hewett and Cheryl E. Ball
Email: kcoverweb@cfcc.net

Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, an online, peer-reviewed journal, is seeking submissions for the Spring 2004 CoverWeb issue on Rhetoric and Pedagogy of Portable Technologies. Including technology in our lives and our classrooms used to mean being tied to a wire and an outlet. As one television commercial implies, communicative tools with wires are becoming outmoded and valueless to many users, and they are losing ground to portable technologies, such as laptop computers, wireless Internet connections, PDAs, and cell telephone text and photographic messaging. As these portable technologies enable greater flexibility of communication, they also push us rhetorically and pedagogically.

For example, some universities provide and/or require laptops and PDAs for their students and faculty. Some schools are trying to move entirely to wireless systems and entire classes with wireless cohorts. Some students come to these environments very facile with such tools, while others must climb both a learning curve and, quite often, a financial access curve. Teachers, as well, face challenges when their institutions ask them to use these technologies in their classrooms. We all know of times where our colleagues or we have hit a technological wall, perhaps crying out to the wind: Why? How? Now what am I supposed to do with this thing (e.g., laptop, PDA, text messaging phone)? Such questions concern not only our teaching plans and expected outcomes, but also our understanding of rhetoric and how to represent and relate rhetoric to students and the world at large.

This CoverWeb seeks to explore both the potential and challenges that influence our understanding of rhetoric and our pedagogical practices when portable technologies are incorporated into our lives. We seek theoretical, as well as highly practical, web and new media texts that address these concerns. Example questions that authors and composers might consider are:

  • What is/are the "rhetoric/s" of portable technologies?
  • What underlying rhetorical principles remain stable when technology becomes portable or when it changes rapidly?
  • With the addition of portable technologies, at what point are we simply teaching one experiment to another, semester to semester?
  • How do we decide what to teach about technological tools versus what to teach with those tools?
  • How can we effect strong online training—beyond technological "how to" and into sound methods—for orienting teachers to these portable online contexts?
  • What challenges and concerns arise for students/teachers who are forced into using technology when they have not used it before?
  • When an institution requires portable technologies of students, who should pay? How are electronic tools different from textbooks or other learning tools?
  • How do we judge student preparedness for technological literacies, and how do we level the learning playing ground for those who lack comfort with them?
  • When text-messaging language arises in a classroom, such as that which has evolved through instant messaging, how do we address it with students?
  • How do portable technologies affect distance learning?

We invite authors to consider these questions, as well as to propose alternate approaches to portable technologies.

Kairos accepts submissions designed specifically for web-deliverable media. Submissions may be designed in alternative modes such as Shockwave, Flash, and digital video, as well as HTML. We will not accept texts created in Microsoft Word, and Web pages created with themes in FrontPage will not be accepted without prior approval from the co-editors. For a full description of submission guidelines, please see the Kairos website: http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/guides/author/index.htm. The deadline for CoverWeb submissions is January 1, 2004.

If you have questions, please contact the CoverWeb co-editors, Beth L. Hewett and Cheryl E. Ball, at kcoverweb@cfcc.net.


Call for Papers: Up Close and Personal: The Possibilities of Narrative Inquiry in Writing Centers.

Deadline: November 15, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Rebecca Jackson and Valerie Balester
Email: rj10@swt.edu
Mailing Address: Rebecca Jackson
Department of English
Southwest Texas State University
San Marcos, TX, 78666

Over the last several years, researchers from across the disciplines have
begun to (re)discover the value of narrative approaches to qualitative
research.  Interests are varied, ranging from analysis of individual, group,
organizational, and cultural narratives-narratives as the focus of
analysis-to the use of narrative as a methodological tool, a way of both
inviting and writing "stories" that celebrate subjectivity, contingency,
intimacy, and possibility.  To date, discussions of narrative in writing
center studies have focused almost exclusively on this last objective, on
the use of researchers' and participants' narratives as both a
legitimate-epistemologically appropriate-form of scholarly discourse and way
of knowing.

The emphasis on researchers' stories is an important one, particularly
because it lays the groundwork for an extended discussion of narrative
research in our field, on narrative as a mode and site of inquiry.  As
writing center researchers, teachers, administrators, and tutors, we have
much to gain by making a full and formal "turn toward narrative."  Narrative
analysis of previously published work in writing centers, for example, would
enable us to map changes in our disciplinary identity over time; narrative
analysis would offer insight, as well, into tutor socialization, the nature
of consultant-writer talk and interaction, or the institutional,
disciplinary, and cultural narratives that shape our approaches to such
things as tutor training or work with faculty from across the disciplines.
As a mode of inquiry, narrative interviews might be used to create rich
portraits of writers, tutors, and administrators, while research written in
experimental narrative forms would give voice to both researchers and
research participants.  As we hope these potential topics illustrate,
narrative inquiry in writing centers is rich, yet largely unexplored,
territory.

We invite proposals for an edited collection entitled Up Close and Personal:
The Possibilities of Narrative Inquiry in Writing Centers.    We envision
the collection organized around three key sections:  (1) research using
narrative as a mode of inquiry; (2) research on narrative(s) as a site of
inquiry; and (3) theoretical and practical discussions of the promises and
limitations of narrative inquiry in writing centers.  We are particularly
interested in essays that explore the intersections of narrative, culture,
and identity and the ways in which narratives are both inescapable and
malleable-shaping, yet capable of being resisted, transformed, and/or
altered.

Possible topics and questions include, but are not limited to, the
following:

I.    Narrative as a mode of inquiry

How might narrative-based interviews be used to understand tutors',
students', administrators', and faculties' writing center-related
experiences, attitudes, identities, constructions of others, etc.?

What do narrative-based interviews suggest about tutors', students',
administrators', and faculties' writing center-related
experiences, attitudes, identities, constructions of others, etc.?

How might narrative-based interviews contribute to outcomes assessment and
program evaluation?  How have narrative-based interviews contributed to
outcomes assessment and program evaluation?

How might narrative be used to prompt student, tutor, administrator
reflection?  How has narrative prompted student, tutor, administrator
reflection?

What portraits of writers, administrators, and tutors emerge from
narrative-based interviews and/or written reconstruction of
experience in narrative form?

What does a narrative approach to writing center space-location,
architecture, layout-tell us about issues of identity, status, power,
institutional relationships, etc.?

II.    Narrative as a site of inquiry

What kinds of narratives get told in various writing center
interactions-tutor/tutor, tutor/student, tutor/administrator,
administrator/administrator, administrator/faculty?  What forms do these
narratives take?

How do student writers negotiate, enact, complicate, and/or resist various
institutional narratives and identities?

How do particular writing centers enact, complicate, and/or resist the
institutional narratives that shape their work?

What "master narratives" shape and are shaped by writing centers and writing
center work?

How do various forms of discourse analysis-conversation analysis, critical
discourse analysis, for example-illuminate actual instances of narrative
talk in writing centers?

What disciplinary narratives compete for privilege in our field?

What stories emerge from various kinds of writing center documents:  tutor
training materials, publicity materials, instructional materials?

III.   Promises and Challenges of Narrative Inquiry

What is the future of narrative inquiry in writing centers?  What directions
are we moving in?  What directions should we move in?

What are the limitations of narrative inquiry in writing centers?

What challenges does narrative inquiry present?

What do tutors and administrators need to know about narrative inquiry?  How
might narrative inquiry be integrated
into tutor training and/or professional development initiatives?

What kinds of experimental forms does narrative inquiry make possible?

Deadline for Proposals:  Please send 2 copies of a 300-500 word proposal,
including your name, institutional affiliation, and tentative paper title,
by November 15, 2003 to Rebecca Jackson, Department of English, Southwest
Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, 78666.   Email submissions are also
welcome and should be sent to Rebecca Jackson,
rj10@swt.edu.

For information or inquiries, please email Rebecca Jackson (address above)
or Valerie Balester,
v-balester@tamu.edu.  We are happy to meet with
potential contributors at the 2003 IWCA conference in Hershey, PA.


The Human Interface with Technology in WAC: Special Issue of The Writing Instructor.

Deadline: November 1, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Linda Bergmann
Email: lbergmann@purdue.edu

This special issue of TWI is aimed both at disseminating knowledge about the development of WAC/WID resources on the web and at investigating how people working in WAC develop and use those resources. Celebrations and critiques are both appropriate. One particular concern is how using technology to reach a wider population can allow us to maintain (or perhaps lose) the human contact between disciplines that tends to be one of the forces that drive WAC. Another is the danger that on-line resources may be primarily “storehouses” that may encourage product-oriented thinking and teaching, and that may reduce disciplinary knowledge to formatting rather than thinking.

 

Possible topics include:

  • the use of web sites and other technological applications in WAC initiatives and programs—new developments, sites, and initiatives
  • the analysis of WAC and WID web sites (including issues of usability across disciplines)
  • the usefulness (or not) of local discussion lists and their interface with other intra-institutional WAC projects
  • developing technological support for programs and projects and keeping it usable over time
  • other human and administrative issues WAC programs encounter when initiating and maintaining a web presence

Send articles, hypertexts, multimedia projects, and other submissions (TWI is completely on-line now, raising all kinds of possibilities) to Linda Bergmann, WAC Issues Editor, Purdue University, lbergmann@purdue.edu. For detailed submission and format information, see www.writinginstructor.com


Call for Essays: Critical Collection in English Studies.

Deadline: October 23, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Jeff Ludwig
Email: jlludwi@ilstu.edu
Mailing Address:

Essays are invited for a collection tentatively entitled, Interdisciplinarity, Fusion, and Reform: New and Critical Inquiries into English Studies.

This collection examines the field of English as it is conceived of by James Berlin, Michael Berube, Sharon Crowley, Gerald Graff, Stephen North et. al, Robert Scholes, etc. Within this conversation, English Studies is "a new disciplinary enterprise" (North), one that encourages "a clash of paradigms, frameworks, languages, and methodologies" (Waller) in the field of English, and one that also generates interdisciplinarity, "fusion" (North), and integration of English’s sub-disciplines.

The editors feel that this collection is an opportunity to develop the material, administrative, and epistemological rationales for a fusion approach to field reform. We welcome works that critique current curricular models of separation or corporate compromise, that integrate the various sub-disciplines, or that offer alternative models of English. As a conversation, we feel that this collection will engage questions about the maintenance of a single disciplinary identity for English, acting as a "locked room" (North) from which new visions of the field emerge.

Submissions for this collection may examine the theoretical and historical underpinnings of curricular reform, including cultural studies, rhetoric(s), ethics, and postmodern approaches to English. Essays may integrate several of the following: research, scholarship, administration, theory, professionalization, and/or teaching, or demonstrate a fusion approach to scholarship through synthesis of multiple sub-disciplines and/or genres. We hope that essays in this collection will demonstrate an awareness of the epistemological and methodological differences between the sub-disciplines.

Questions and/or topics of interest include:

  • In what spaces is integration of the sub-disciplines of English natural, imperative, or beneficial?
  • How are our research methodologies (qualitative and quantitative) complementary or contradictory?
  • What kinds of epistemological frameworks inform English Studies as a field (overlap, disparity, etc.)?
  • How have calls for curricular reforms been enacted, battled, and/or rehearsed?
  • Have these reforms affected practice? How and why?
  • Have these reforms affected the marketability of our graduates?
  • How has English Studies as an "integrated" field been constructed?
  • What can our institutional histories tell us about new models for English Studies?
  • How can scholarship between the sub-disciplines of English be fused?
  • How have current moves to social responsibility (ethics, rhetoric(s), disability studies, queer studies, multiculturalism, feminism(s), etc.) affected the work of English?

The deadline for submission is October 23rd, 2003.

Please submit the following:

  1. A short proposal examining the context of your essay (500 words)
  2. An abstract of your essay (150 words).

Please submit materials electronically (Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format). jlludwi@ilstu.edu

This collection is jointly edited by Jeff Ludwig and Lori A. Ostergaard (Illinois State University).


CFP: International Writing Centers: Issues and Answers.

Deadline: September 30, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Leigh Ryan or Joan Mullin
Email: LR22@umail.umd.edu

While writing centers have a strong recorded history in the United States, the accomplishments of colleagues around the world have not been as extensively documented. The recent publication Teaching Academic Writing in European Higher Education focuses on the many ways in which writing is taught in Europe, and includes writing centers.  However, we seek submissions not only from Europe, but from around the world in order to compile a publication that views specifically how writing centers operate, using theory, pedagogy and administrative knowledge as it emerges within particular contexts. In a community of scholars seeking to reflect on and recreate new knowledge, we would like to challenge and/or support our “Idea of a Writing Center” by expanding our understanding of the term “writing center.” Additionally, we want to establish an exchange of global writing center perspectives that will be useful for practitioners as well as for the writers with whom we work and send into the world.

We invite anyone within or collaboratively connected to the international writing center community to contribute to this collection that will illuminate current practices around the world while pointing to issues particular to contexts that have not been fully explored by our international community. So that a variety of facets that make up writing center work can be examined in depth, we would like each contributor to focus on the most significant issue/problem/question confronted in theorizing, establishing, maintaining, or making changes in a writing center. By September 30, 2003, submit a (maximum) two- page summary of your proposed chapter in which you explain

  • What issue/problem/question you will address
  • How/why did that issue/problem/question manifest itself? 
  • How you handle it?  What was successful?  What wasn’t?  or
  • What have you learned from confronting the issue/problem/question that is of use to the international writing center community?

Final drafts will address the context in which the issue/problem question arose, but timely topics to propose include the

    • Material conditions and placement of a writing center (e.g., getting administrative support, physical location and structure, fitting into the academic/community structure, funding and workloads);
    • Theoretical impact of writing centers (e.g., changing the curriculum; getting faculty support; finding and training staff and tutors; changing faculty pedagogy)
    • Challenges to current models (reflective practice that led to new pedagogies; theories emerging out of practice;

Authors of proposals will be notified of acceptance by October 31 and completed manuscripts (MLA format) will be due May 1 2004.

Please send electronic proposal by September 30, 2003 and all questions to either:

Leigh Ryan                            or                                    Joan Mullin

LR22@umail.umd.edu                         JMullin@UTNet.Utoledo.Edu


"Identifying New Media," Winter 2003 special issue, Post Identity.

Deadline: September 30, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Rosemary Weatherston
Email: weatherr@UDMERCY.EDU
Mailing Address:

Post Identity, a national, fully-refereed journal of the humanities, publishes scholarship that problematizes the narratives underlying individual, social, and cultural identity formations; that investigates the relationship between identity formations and texts; and that argues how such formations can be challenged.

Increasingly we, our contributors, and our readers are finding that the most powerful of these cultural formations and their most provocative critical challenges are combining text, images, and sound: we use to watch films; we now consume DVD assemblages of multiple cuts, interviews, and games. We use to only print our work; we are now publishing web sites that embed that work in multimedia settings.

In response to these cultural and disciplinary changes, Post Identity has partnered with the University of Michigan’s Scholarly Publishing Office to transform itself into an audio-, graphic-, and video-enhanced web-based journal that can make available the new forms and subjects of contemporary critiques of identity, as well as more traditional text-based scholarship.

The theme for our Winter 2003 special issue is "Identifying New Media." We are looking for submissions that theorize how new media forms (DVDs; e-books; Internet blogs, digital archives, interactive gaming; etc.) are changing cultural and academic understandings of identity and authorship, and/or how new media might provide models for new forms of scholarship. We especially are interested in experimental work that performs its theory, such as essays or projects that offer alternative models to the standard academic essay. We are interested in the relationship between the form and content of academic discourse, and the ways in which this discourse might evolve in light of the new media scene.

We invite the immediate submission of 300-word abstracts of essays and other academic projects on this theme. We encourage submissions from a variety of theoretical perspectives and from all disciplines for which the critique of identity is of vital and central concern. Final essays/projects should fall within the range of 3,000 to 10,000 words and will be due September 30, 2003.

Please submit abstracts to Professor Rosemary Weatherston at weatherr@udmercy.edu. Past print issues of Post Identity are available until September 2003 at http://liberalarts.udmercy.edu/pi/. The new web-based format of PI is under construction at http://www.hti.umich.edu/p/postid/.


Graduate Research Network.

URL: http://www2.gasou.edu/facstaff/jwalker/cfp/cw2003/grn.html
Deadline: April 23, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Janice R. Walker
Email: jwalker@gasou.edu
Phone: 912-871-1327
Fax: 912-681-0783
Mailing Address: Department of Writing and Linguistics Georgia Southern University P.O. Box 8026 Statesboro, GA 30460

COMPUTERS & WRITING (GRADUATE) RESEARCH NETWORK 2003

It's not too late to be a part of this exciting event! We need both participants and discussion leaders!  SIGN UP NOW!

This year's event will take place on May 22, 2003, at the Computers and Writing Conference hosted by Purdue University.  The GRN is designed to be as low-stress and helpful as possible.  We welcome people (graduate students or others) who just want an opportunity to talk about their ideas, their projects in gestation or in progress, or at any stage of development. 

If you have specific questions you need answered, bring them along, or, if you just want a chance to explore where you might go with a project or where you have been--that will work, too.  Or keep us informed about your progress (or opportunities) on projects you presented to us previously.  Some people will be presenting their projects more formally later in the conference; the GRN is a chance to discuss your presentation informally and get feedback beforehand.  Some projects are dissertations, theses, or other works at various stages of completion, and some are just beginning to explore ideas.  All of these projects are welcome! Not a graduate student but still want to present your work in progress and get feedback?  Not a problem, either!

For more information about this year's GRN, see our Call for Participation at
http://www2.gasou.edu/facstaff/jwalker/cfp/cw2003/grn.html.  Use the online submission form, or email jwalker@gasou.edu for more information.

We hope you can attend this year.  Please pass this along to other people who you know might benefit from this event. Whether or not you plan to attend, we invite you to subscribe to the GRN-L listserv!  For information on subscribing, see http://www2.gasou.edu/facstaff/jwalker/GRN/grn-l.html

Don't forget to register for the Computers and Writing Conference before April 20 to get the special early-registration discount.  A special graduate student conference fee of $100 is available which includes all events, and the GRN workshop is FREE to all registered conference participants.  More nformation can be found on the Conference Web site at http://www.cw2003.org.

For information about this year's GRN Online, contact ???

We look forward to seeing you at CW2003!!!


Refiguring Style: Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.

Deadline: April 1, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: T. R. Johnson
Email: trjohnso@uno.edu
Mailing Address: Dept of English
University of New Orleans
New Orleans, LA 70148

Since the early 1980s, many teachers of composition have associated the teaching of style with a product-oriented pedagogy that emphasizes standards of form and rules of usage and that relies on exercises that are stripped of rhetorical context and unconnected to the student's actual writing. In short, many of us understand pedagogies interested in style as counter to pedagogies interested in critical and creative thinking. Conversely, many figures in the history of rhetoric have understood style very differently -- as inherently interwoven with the sorts of reflection that generate ideas for writing.

Classical rhetoricians such as Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian, for instance, recognized style’s capacity as a tool of invention. What's more, much recent scholarship in the field of composition suggests we should re-evaluate style-based pedagogies. In her book The Emperor’s New Clothes (1995), Kathryn Flannery argues for a rhetorical conception of style that advocates artifice and a range of styles; Robert Connors questions the demise of sentence-level pedagogy since the 1980s in his article "The Erasure of the Sentence" (2000); and Peter Elbow laments the dismissal of style in a recent College English opinion piece, "The Cultures of Literature and Composition: What Could Each Learn from the Other?" (2002).

Therefore, we are seeking essay-proposals from a wide range of composition teachers for a book called Refiguring Style: Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy. We are particularly interested in works that address one or more of the following questions: How can we teach style as a tool for invention and/or critical reflection? How has style figured historically in writing classrooms and/or in the minds of writers? What sorts of theories can help us understand the ways an awareness of style might figure in students' experience of the composing process? How should we think about style-based pedagogies in the context of institutional and disciplinary politics, even the wider politics of race, class, gender, and sexuality? How might we re-imagine the role of literary texts in a style-based writing classroom? How can style help us rethink the conflicting interests in authorial voice and academic discourse? How might style-based pedagogies figure within composition teachers' anxieties about their status as professionals, as belonging to an academic discipline?

Please send a 500 word proposal by April 1, 2003 to T. R. Johnson / Dept of English / University of New Orleans / New Orleans, LA 70148 trjohnso@uno.edu or to Thomas Pace / Dept of English / John Carroll University / 20700 North Park Blvd. / University Heights, OH 44118, tpace@jcu.edu


Council of Writing Program Administrators, 2003 MLA Annual Convention, San Diego, CAPanel Sessions.

Deadline: February 28, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Susanmarie Harrington
Email: sharrin@iupui.edu

Each year, the WPA sponsors two panel sessions at the Modern Language Association conference in December. The following call will also appear in the next MLA newsletter, due out Feb. 7. Please note that the deadline is Feb. 28, in order for the committee to make decisions and assemble the panels by the (very strict) MLA deadline of 1 April. You need to send your proposal to Susanmarie Harrington.

Panel #1

Topic: "Plagiarism: Multiple Complicities, Needed Interventions"

Call: Papers addressing the complexities of plagiarism in academic contexts and ways in which teaching and administrative practices encourage or discourage plagiarism.

Panel #2

Topic: "Teacher Preparation in English: The State of the Profession"

Call: Papers addressing the current status and possible future directions of teacher preparation (in all groups) across the domain of English studies.

Send proposals (one page maximum) by email or as attached files no later than Feb. 28, 2003, to Susanmarie Harrington, Selection Committee Chair sharrin@iupui.edu

Proposals should include a cover sheet with all identifying information (including contact information); the one page proposal with no identifying information; and a statement that the proposer is a member of both the MLA and the WPA.


The WAC Journal: Call for Submissions.

URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/
Deadline: February 28, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Roy Andrews
Email: roya@mail.plymouth.edu

The WAC Journal is an annual collection of articles by educators about their WAC ideas and WAC experiences. It is a journal of both practical ideas and pertinent theory. The editorial board of The WAC Journal seeks WAC-related articles from across the country for volume 14. Our national review board welcomes inquiries, proposals, and 5-15 page double-spaced manuscripts on WAC-related topics: WAC Techniques and Applications, WAC Writing Experiences, Reflections on WAC, WAC Literature Reviews, Interviews with WAC Personalities, WAC and Writing Centers.

Send inquiries, proposals, or 5-15 page double-spaced manuscripts to Roy Andrews via email, roya@mail.plymouth.edu, by February 28, 2003. Any standard document style (MLA, APA, etc.) is acceptable. The WAC Journal is perfect-bound, peer-reviewed and approximately 150 pages long. It is published annually in the spring.


Call for Submissions: IWCA Update.

Deadline: February 15, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Bill Macauley
Email: MACAULWJ@MUC.EDU

The next issue of IWCA Update will be coming out at the end of February. So, the deadline for submissions will be February 15, 2003. A few guidelines:

  • Personal and hiring announcements should be kept to 50 words.
  • Conference, book, grant, award, and other public announcements should be kept to 100 words.
  • CFPs should be kept to 250 words.
  • "One Question" pieces should be no longer than 500 words.
  • Articles, conference reviews/responses, short fiction, and other extended prose should generally be no longer than 1500 words.
  • Poetry, book reviews, short text selections, and any other submissions will be handled on a case-by-case (i.e., space and topic) basis.

If you have other materials you would like to submit, please do so. I am willing to work with you to make this publication the most lively, substantive publication it can be.

Thank you.

Bill Macauley, Editor

Please make a note of that deadline. Please also continue to send the wide variety of texts.


Call for Proposals: The Fourth Biennial Feminism(s) & Rhetoric(s) Conference.

URL: http://english.ohio-state.edu/femrhet
Deadline: February 1, 2003.
Contact Information
Contact: Nan Johnson
Email: johnson.112@osu.edu
Phone: (614) 292-5774
Mailing Address: Feminism(s) and Rhetoric(s) Conference
Rhetoric and Composition Program
Department of English
The Ohio State University
421 Denney Hall
164 West 17th Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210

The Rhetoric and Composition Program of the Department of English at Ohio State University is pleased to announce the Fourth Biennial International Feminism(s) and Rhetoric(s) Conference, "Intersections: Critical Locations of Feminist Rhetorical Practice," to be held October 23-25, 2003 on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University. Recognizing the cross-disciplinarity and multivocality of feminisms and rhetorics, this conference invites the participation of scholars, activists, and artists in feminist theory, literacy theory, rhetorical theory, speech communication, art and art theory, creative writing, literary theory, women's studies, education, comparative studies, composition, linguistics, history, postcolonial theory, and other fields.

 

We invite proposals that explore critical intersections of rhetorics and feminist discourse. Topics might include (but are certainly not limited to) theoretical and practical explorations of the rhetorics of gender, race, class, culture, age, sexuality, and ability in the areas of performance/enactment; space, place, and mapping; digital technologies and media; visual culture; feminist research methodologies; literacies; historical-rhetorical depictions of women; rhetorical discourses of the body; individual and professional identities; revisions of canonical, literary, artistic, historical and rhetorical perspectives; the rhetorics of masculinities and men's studies; geopolitical and public policy; institutional practices of school, church, home, and workplace; and the rhetorics of recovery and revisions of marginalized groups. Featured speakers include Susan Jarratt and Andrea Lunsford. The conference web site address is http://english.ohio-state.edu/femrhet

 

Formats may include individual presentations (20 min.), 3-4 member panels (1 1/2 hours), and workshops or roundtables (1 1/2 hrs.). Although traditional presentations are acceptable, we encourage participants to create formats that go beyond the read-aloud academic paper. Interactive sessions that include discussions, dialogues, and performances are especially welcome. Please, each applicant may submit only one proposal.

 

For individual presentations:

 

Submit three copies of a 250-word description of the presentation and title. Please indicate the format of your presentation (traditional scholarly paper, performance, dialogue, audience discussion, other alternative form). On a separate cover page, provide the title of your proposal and a brief (25 word) description or abstract. Also list your name, address, phone, e-mail, and institutional affiliation.

 

For group presentations:

 

Submit three copies of a 250-750-word description of the presentation and title, indicating the role(s) of each participant.

 

Please indicate the format of your presentation. (traditional scholarly paper, performance, dialogue, audience discussion, other alternative form) On a separate cover page, provide the title of your proposal and a brief (50 word) description or abstract. Also list the names, addresses, phones, e-mails, and institutional affiliations of all participants. Please specify one member to serve as a contact.

 

Proposals may be mailed or sent as e-mail attachments (Word or rtf format) to Susan Delagrange at delagrange.2@osu.edu.

 

For more information, contact Nan Johnson at johnson.112@osu.edu or

(614) 292-5774, or Susan Delagrange at delagrange.2@osu.edu or (419) 755-4235.


Call for Proposals: 2003 WPA Research Grants.

URL: http://www.ilstu.edu/~ddhesse/wpa/grants/2003researchgrants.htm
Deadline: January 24, 2003.

Research grants are designed to provide WPA members with some modest funding to pursue research projects that will help advance our knowledge in areas related to writing programs and writing program administration.

To get to the call, please follow the links from the WPA home page (click on "Grants and Awards") or go directly to the call at http://www.ilstu.edu/~ddhesse/wpa/grants/2003researchgrants.htm.

If you scoll to the bottom of the call, you'll find a link to an annotated research proposal that shows how the selection criteria were applied to a real case. This may help you to prepare your proposal.


Language and Learning Across the Curriculum: Cultural Studies and Writing in the Disciplines.

URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/llad/
Deadline: October 1, 2002.
Contact Information
Contact: Sharon Stockton
Email: stockton@dickinson.edu
Mailing Address: Sharon Stockton, Guest Editor, LLAD
English Department
Dickinson College
Carlisle, PA 17013

We are seeking essays that explore connections between cultural criticism and the discourses of the academic disciplines. Articles may conduct historical investigations into the culturally-derived origins of specific disciplines, interdisciplines or sub-disciplines; explore the ways in which disciplinary rhetoric privileges certain voices; track alternative rhetorics surviving in the margins of mainstream academic discourse. We encourage writers to address these topics from diverse critical stances by employing theories including but not limited to those of class, gender, sexuality, diaspora, ethnicity, and new media. We welcome contributors who specialize in rhetoric and composition studies as well as those who teach in other disciplines and/or interdisciplines.

Deadline for 2-Page Proposals: October 1, 2002

Notification: by December 1


Call for Proposals for Genre Across the Curriculum, An Edited Collection.

URL: http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~cmoran/GACprospectus.htm
Deadline: September 15, 2002.
Contact Information
Contact: Charles Moran
Email: cmoran@english.umass.edu
Mailing Address: Anne Herrington and Charles Moran
Department of English
Box 30515
University of Massachusetts
Amherst MA 01003-0515

You are invited to submit proposed chapters for a book titled Genre Across the Curriculum. The book's aim is to provide teachers of first-year writing courses and of first- and second-year general education courses with specific guidance in using genre in generative ways for teaching. The book will broaden teachers' awareness of how teachers across the disciplines conceive of genre and how they see these genres relating to their students' learning. We are looking for chapter-proposals in these particular areas: genre as a theoretical approach to frame courses in disciplines other than English and aimed to introduce students to the practices and genres of that discipline; the Writer's Autobiography and other applications of autobiographical writing; the research/documented essay in English and in a discipline other than English; and approaches that invite hybrid or mixed genres, particularly in disciplines other than English.

Proposed chapters should include excerpts of students writing within and against the specified genre. Ideally, the teacher-author would interview one or more students to capture their understanding of how genre played in their writing. The teacher-author might keep a reading log of the ways in which genre played in her reading of students' writing.

The proposal should be no more than one page, single spaced and should be sent to:

   Anne Herrington and Charles Moran
   Department of English
   Box 30515
   University of Massachusetts
   Amherst MA 01003-0515

or submitted electronically to cmoran@english.umass.edu, by September 15, 2002. No work that has been previously published will be considered.

A full prospectus of the book is available online at http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~cmoran/GACprospectus.htm.


WAC Journal CFP.

URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal
Deadline: January 1, 1900.
Contact Information
Contact: Lee Anna Cardwell
Email: wacjournal@parlorpress.com

Publish in The WAC Journal

 

The WAC Journal invites article submissions. We are interested in all WAC-related topics and especially those that offer new insights on WAC ambitions, concerns, or problems. Perhaps you have new data from a study or can apply a theory not applied before to shed new insights on an important aspect of WAC. Or maybe you can draw on your experiences and thinking, while referring to published scholars, to help readers think in a new way about a WAC problem or untapped potential. Please send queries and informal proposals to Roy Andrews, editor, via email (wacjournal@parlorpress.com). Submit manuscripts through Submittable at https://parlorpress.submittable.com/submit/18762.


The WAC Journal is an open-access, peer-reviewed-blind journal published annually by Clemson University, Parlor Press, and the WAC Clearinghouse. It is available in print through Parlor Press at http://www.parlorpress.com/wacjournal and online in open-access format at the WAC Clearinghouse via http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/. Articles are accepted throughout the year on a rolling basis.

 

Best,

 

Lea Anna Cardwell

Managing Editor of The WAC Journal

wacjournal@parlorpress.com


Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing.

URL: http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh
Deadline: January 1, 1900.
Contact Information
Contact: Paul Pasquaretta
Email: Paul.Pasquaretta@quinnipiac.edu

Beginning in 2017 Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing will open its submission process to all topics that falls within its focus and scope.  Specially themed volumes will appear as supplements, and potential contributors are invited to propose themes/guest editorships for these volumes.