The WAC Bibliography

View the Bibliography
View Entire Bibliography
Conduct a Custom Search
Keyword:
Author:
Title:
View Categories
Writing in the Disciplines
Writing to Learn
Program Design [Expand More]
Faculty Concerns
WAC in Two-Year Colleges
WAC in the Schools
WAC in the Disciplines [Expand More]
WAC Assessment
Pedagogy [Expand More]
Writing Processes
Writing Conventions
Genre [Expand More]
Research
WAC and Writing Centers/Learning Centers
Writing Fellows Programs
WAC and Second-Language Writing
Service and Experiential Learning
Literacy
Community
Inquiry
Technology
Discourse Analysis
Graduate Students

Add Add a Source
Welcome to the WAC Bibliography. The bibliography, developed and presented in collaboration with CompPile, was developed to support teachers across the disciplines who are interested in using writing and speaking in their courses; scholars who are interested in WAC theory and research; and program administrators, designers, and developers who have interests in the latest work in faculty outreach, program design, and assessment.

To view entries in the bibliography, follow the links to the right. If you are a member of the Clearinghouse, you can recommend new sources for the bibliography.

— Justin Jory
Bibliography Editor

Important Note: We're seeing some occasional connection errors when we connect to the CompPile databse. We're working on the problem and hope to have it addressed soon. In the meantime, if you get an error message when searching the database, please refresh the page. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Nursing

Aguilar, Irma. (1988). A medical-surgical nursing class participates in writing across the curriculum. In Killingsworth, Jimmie; Donald H. Cunningham; Laurie L. Jones (Eds.); Texas Tech University; Designing writing assignments for vocational-technical courses: A guide for teachers in the two-year college and technical institute; ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 298 331.
Keywords: WAC, nursing-course, assignment, techcom, vocational, medical, surgical, participation
Alster, Kristine Beyerman. (2004). Writing in nursing education and nursing practice. In Zamel, Vivian; Ruth Spack (Ed.), Crossing the curriculum: Multilingual learners in college classrooms; Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
Keywords: ESL, WAC, academic, acculturation, nursing-course, teacher-opinion
Ashworth, Thomas Edward. (1992). Using writing-to-learn strategies in community college associate degree nursing programs [doctoral thesis]. Blacksburg, VA: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
Keywords: nursing, write-to-learn, two-year, WAC, critical-thinking, improvement, data
Barnes, J. Neal. (1988). A writing-intensive course in automotive engine repair. In Killingsworth, Jimmie; Donald H. Cunningham; Laurie L. Jones (Eds.); Texas Tech University; Designing writing assignments for vocational-technical courses: A guide for teachers in the two-year college and technical institute; ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 298 331.
Keywords: WAC, nursing-course, assignment, techcom, vocational, automotive, writing-intensive, syllabus
Birch, Dianne. (1983). Studying writing in nursing. In Writing Across the Curriculum Program (Ed.), Working papers on writing and learning; Radford, VA: Radford University.
Keywords: WAC, nursing-course
Bitsche, Cathy. (1988). A writing-intensive course in respiratory care. In Killingsworth, Jimmie; Donald H. Cunningham; Laurie L. Jones (Eds.); Texas Tech University; Designing writing assignments for vocational-technical courses: A guide for teachers in the two-year college and technical institute; ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 298 331.
Keywords: nursing-course, respiratory care, writing-intensive, WAC
Brennan, Michael J.. (1995). Essay writing in nursing: Alerting students and teachers to the educational benefits. Nurse Education Today 15.5, 351-356.
Keywords: WAC, nursing-course, essay-writing, reflection, self-evaluation, write-to-learn
Chapman, David W.. (1991). Under the influence: Traces of WAC in nursing and allied health scholarship. Issues in Writing 03.2, 196-210.
Keywords: WAC, nursing, trace, health-services
Christiansen, Pauline. (1979). Across disciplines: A three pronged approach--one department's response to campus-wide writing needs. ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 177 590.
Keywords: WAC, faculty-workshop, teacher-cooperation, nursing-school, vocabulary
Devlin, Kathleen; Susan C. Slaninka. (1981). Writing across the curriculum. Journal of Nursing Education 20.2, 19-22.
Keywords: WAC, nursing
Dobie, Ann; Gail Poirrier. (1996). When nursing students write: Changing attitudes. http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/archives.cfm [full-text]. Language and Learning Across the Disciplines 01.3, 23-33.
This three-year study confirms several significant effects of using writing-to-learn techniques in the nursing classroom. Specifically, it provides evidence of three areas of positive impact: (1) improved student attitudes towards writing and learning, (2) strengthened student-teacher communication, and (3) increased student retention. As a result, the findings create a strong rationale for including writing to learn in the freshmen nursing curriculum, and perhaps for instituting it throughout the entire nursing program. [WAC Clearinghouse]
Keywords: nursing, WAC, change, student-attitude
Dobie, Ann; Gail Poirrier. (1997). Nurses writing: The undergraduate years and beyond. ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 414 589.
Keywords: nursing program, WAC, alumn-opinion, data, contrast-group, intensive, follow-up, undergraduate
Donckers, Susan. (1983). Clinical writing assignments. In Writing Across the Curriculum Program (Ed.), Working papers on writing and learning; Radford, VA: Radford University.
Keywords: WAC, nursing-course, clinical, assignment
Feirn, Mary. (1989). Writing in health science: A short course for grad nursing. [fulltext]. Writing Lab Newsletter 13.5, 5-8.
Keywords: wcenter, health-sciences, WAC, nursing, short-course, accelerated
Gimenez, Julio. (2008). Beyond the academic essay: Discipline-specific writing in nursing and midwifery. Journal of English for Academic Purposes 07.3, 151-164.
Although academic writing in higher education has been the focus of research efforts for more than two decades, the specific writing experiences, needs and difficulties of undergraduate nursing and midwifery students have remained largely under-researched. This article reports on a project that investigated the nature and dynamics of academic writing in pre-registration nursing and midwifery at a UK university. The project collected data from a survey completed by 135 students and two focus groups. The article examines the specific genres on these two programmes, the difficulties participating students face when writing them, and their views as to how they can be best supported to do these tasks. It concludes with an analysis of the implications that these issues have for teaching discipline-specific genres in nursing and midwifery and offers some suggestions to respond to such implications. [author abstract]
Keywords: academic, nursing-major, midwife-major, England, survey, student-opinion, focus group, data, program, WAC
Givens, Karolyn Whittlesey. (1990). Facilitating the cognitive growth of baccalaureate nursing students: Using writing strategies for thinking and cognitive development [doctoral thesis]. Blacksburg, VA: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
Keywords: WAC, nursing, growth, cognitive, strategy, critical-thinking, development
Haneline, Douglas. (1990). The health professional as writer: Two models for integrating writing into the curricula of baccalaureate health programs. ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 318 015.
Keywords: health, curriculum, WAC, model, undergraduate, nursing-program, integrated
Harvie, Mary; Robyn Moroney; Anne Smith. (1997). Developing critical literacy for nursing and health science: Philosophy, policy, theory for practice and research for a subject integrated approach. In Golebiowsky, Zofia; Helen Borland (Eds.), Academic communication across disciplines and cultures: Selected proceedings of the National Conference on Teritary Literacy: Research and Practice (Vol. 2); Melbourne, Australia: Victorial University of Technology Press.
Keywords: WAC, nursing-course, health-science, integrated, philosophy, policy
Heaslip, Penny. (1992). Creating the thinking practitioner: Critical thinking in clinical practice. ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 354 822.
Keywords: WAC, nursing, medical, critical-thinking, write-to-learn, exercise, pedagogy
Johnson, Davie Lee Wright. (1988). The clinical journal for nursing students. In Killingsworth, Jimmie; Donald H. Cunningham; Laurie L. Jones (Eds.); Texas Tech University; Designing writing assignments for vocational-technical courses: A guide for teachers in the two-year college and technical institute; ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 298 331.
Keywords: WAC, nursing-course, assignment, techcom, vocational, clinical, journal-writing
Parker, Robert P.; Vera Goodkin. (1987). The consequences of writing: Enhancing learning in the disciplines. ERIC Document Reproduction Service, ED 272 928.
Keywords: WAC, heuristics, heuristic, learning-theory, language-theory, write-to-learn, constructivist, entomology-course, nursing-course, psychology-course, mathematics-course, women's-studies-course, consequence
Pearse, Steve. (1985). Writing to learn: The nurse log classroom. link to 2013 WAC Clearinghouse reprint In Gere, Ann Ruggles; Roots in the sawdust: Writing to learn across the disciplines; Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.
Keywords: write-to-learn, WAC, nursing-course, learning-log, pedagogy
Peters, Brad; Julie Fisher Robertson. (2007). Portfolio partnerships between faculty and WAC: Lessons from disciplinary practice, reflection, and transformation. College Composition and Communication 59.2, 206-236.
Keywords: Assessment, composition, cost-effective, coverage, cultural, efficiency, evaluation, FYC, nursing, portfolio, reflection, rubric, knowledge-transfer, transferability, WAC, WPA, transformative
Poirrier, Gail P.. (1997). Writing-to-learn: Curricular strategies for nursing and other disciplines. New York: NLN Press.
Keywords: nursing, nursing-course, write-to-learn, curriculum, disciplinary, academic, WAC
Shea, Kelly A.; Mary McAleer Balkun; Susan A. Nolan; John T. Saccoman; Joyce Wright. (2006). One more time: Transforming the curriculum across the disciplines through technology-based faculty development and writing-intensive course redesign. [Link]. Across the Disciplines 03.
Shea and her colleagues describe a WAC project, born of their university's commitment to writing and ubiquitous computing, that engaged nearly 70 faculty members in WAC training over four years. The authors describe the project and its results, emphasizing three case studies of faculty members from psychology, mathematics, and nursing. (Published February 21, 2006) [WAC Clearinghouse]
Keywords: WAC, computer, technology, faculty development, professional development, case-study, data, qualitative, psychology, mathematics, nursing, curriculum-design, writing-intensive, transformative
Sheridan, Barrett E.; Helen Melville Jones. (1999). Assessment of changes in the level of critical thinking in nursing courses in Australian universities: A pilot study. Journal of Teaching Academic Survival Skills 01 (Winter/Spring), 40-62.
Keywords: critical-thinking, gain, nursing, WAC, argumentation, data, pre-post, pilot study, pilot study
Shine, Moira. (1982). Teaching student nurses to write nurses' notes. In Gallehr, Donald; Robert Gilstrap; Marian Mohr; Anne Legge; Marie Wilson-Nelson (Eds.), Writing processes of college students: Working papers of the Writing Research Center at the Northern Virginia Writing Project (Volume I); Fairfax, VA: George Mason University, The Project.
Keywords: WAC, nursing, log
Shine, Moira Shannon. (1982). The composing processes of nursing students in clinical writing. In Gallehr, Donald; Robert Gilstrap; Anne Legge; Marian Mohr; Marie Wilson-Nelson (Eds.), Writing processes of college students: Working papers of the Writing Research Center of Virginia at the Northern Virginia Writing Project, George Mason University, Volume II; Fairfax, VA: George Mason University.
Keywords: WAC, nursing, case-study, process, composing, data, process
Silva, Mary Cipriano; Ann H. Cary; Christopher Thaiss. (1999). When students can't write: Solutions through a writing-intensive nursing course. Nursing and Health Care Perspectives 20.3, 142-145.
Keywords: apprehension, nursing-course, pre-post, improvement, self-efficacy, assignment, letter-writing, academy-workplace, coaching, style, drafting, response, positive, writing-intensive
Sitler, Helen Collins. (2001). The workplace meets the academy: The hybrid literacy of returning RNs in journal writing for introductin to theology [registered nurse]. [fulltext]. Language and Learning Across the Disciplines 5.1.
Like window glass, most workplace writing is transparent. Although integral to work done well, writing is not the goal in and of itself and occurs at a subconscious level of the writer's awareness. In contrast, writing for school is often opaque, occurring with the writer's attention consciously focused on the task. The writing itself, as evidence of learning accomplished, may be its sole purpose. The writer, graded on her/his writing, cannot afford to let the words on the page become transparent, nor can the instructor, who uses the writing to assess learning which has occurred (Dias, Freedman, Medway, & Pare, 1999). The transparency or opaqueness of writing, one of the key differences between writing in the workplace and writing in school, raises questions about how students who find themselves simultaneously in both worlds manage contradictory writing demands. What happens when writers with well-developed workplace writing practices return to school? How do they respond when writing is suddenly no longer transparent?
Keywords: WAC, WID, academy-workplace, nursing, hybridity, theology, literacy, write-to-learn, reentry
Sorrell, Jeanne. (2001). Stories in the nursing classroom: Writing and learning through stories. [fulltext]. Language and Learning Across the Disciplines 5.1.
This article discusses the use of stories to teach students important meanings of course content. In this discussion, the author discusses: (a) background information from the literature to make a case for teaching with stories, (b) therapeutic uses of storytelling, (c) strategies for using storytelling in teaching, and (d) telling stories beyond the classroom.
Keywords: WAC, WID, writing across the curriculum, writing to learn, nursing, story-telling, stories
Thais, Ann Jeffries. (1982). The nurse as writer: Signing the bottom line. [fulltext]. Writing: Newsletter of the George Mason University Faculty Writing Program 02 (April), 03-Feb.
Keywords: nursing, WAC, workplace
Young, Lin. (1983). Reflections on writing in nursing education. In Writing Across the Curriculum Program (Ed.), Working papers on writing and learning; Radford, VA: Radford University.
Keywords: WAC, nursing-course
Young, Sandra Gail. (1996). Uncovering common meanings: Expository writing, creative writing, and nursing students [doctoral thesis]. Louisville, KY: University of Louisville.
Keywords: nursing, expository, creative, curriculum, WAC, expository